GeoLog

permafrost

Imaggeo on Mondays: Exploring ice in the deep

Imaggeo on Mondays: Exploring ice in the deep

The occurrence of sporadic permafrost in the Alps often needs challenging fieldwork in order to be investigated. Here in the high altitude karstic plateau of Mt. Canin-Kanin (2587 m asl) in the Julian Alps (southeastern European Alps) several permanent ice deposits have been recently investigated highlighting how also in such more resilient environments global warming is acting rapidly. Important portions of the underground cryosphere are actually rapidly melting, loosing valuable paleoarchives contained in the ice.

Description by Renato R. Colucci, as it first appeared on imaggeo.egu.eu.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Arctic cottongrass in Svalbard

Imaggeo on Mondays: Arctic cottongrass in Svalbard

In the High Arctic, where vegetation is limited in height, cottongrass stands out as some of the tallest plant species around.

This photo shows a wispy white patch of Arctic cottongrass growing amongst other tundra vegetation in the Advent river floodplain of Adventdalen, a valley on the Norwegian archipelago island Svalbard.

Svalbard is of particular scientific interest as it is a relatively warm region for its high latitude. This is due to the North Atlantic Ocean, which transports heat from lower latitudes to Svalbard’s shores.

The photo was taken in September 2014, towards the end of the region’s growing season. In the background, you can see that the season’s first snow had already blanketed the valley’s neighboring mountain tops.

Cottongrass generally loves wet conditions and scientists sometimes even use this plant genus (Eriophorum) as an indicator of the ground’s fluctuating water level, especially in areas that begin to develop peat, an accumulation of more of less decomposed plant material in wet environments. The waters feeding this region’s wetland come from melted snow and ice travelling down the adjacent mountains and floodwater from the Advent river, which is primarily meltwater fed.

Arctic cottongrass also can exchange gases with their underground environment through their roots and even have been shown to alter the local carbon budget of regions where they grow. It is therefore a very important species to account for when studying permafrost carbon dynamics.

Gunnar Mallon, currently a teaching fellow at the University of Sheffield (UK), took this photo while on a fieldwork expedition together with Andy Hodson, a glaciology professor at the University Centre in Svalbard, for the LowPerm project.

The LowPerm project aimed to understand how nutrients are transported within permafrost landscapes in Norway and Russia and how that may affect the production of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). The study brought together scientists from the UK, Norway, Denmark and Russia and results from the extensive field and laboratory work are currently being analysed and made ready for publication.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Mother Tree

 Mother Tree, Mongolia . Credit: Gantuya Ganbat (distributed via  imaggeo.egu.eu)

Mother Tree, Mongolia . Credit: Gantuya Ganbat (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Landlocked, home to mountains, deserts and the southernmost permafrost territories, Mongolia’s climate is harsh.  Warm, often humid summers, give way to freezing winters where temperatures dip as low as -25°C. Rainfall is restricted to a short period in the summer months of June and August.

These climatic factors, combined with the lack of a strong forest management strategy and anthropogenic influences, mean that only 11% of the vast 1567 million km²  of the Mongolian territory (that is larger than the area covered by Germany, Italy, France and the UK combined), is covered by forests.

The majority of forests are located in the northern part of the country, along the border with Russia. They form a transition zone between the cold, subarctic forests of Siberia and the vast steppes of southern Asia.

This week’s Imaggeo on Mondays image is the imposing, and holy, Mother Tree. Located in one of the many Tujiin Nars (pine forests) of the northern Selenge Aimag province, this giant pine is worshiped by locals who believe if you ask a wish of the Mother Tree, it will come true. Its lowermost branches are lavishly decorated with Khadags, traditional Tibetan Buddhist ceremonial scarves, brought as offerings by locals and foreign visitors alike.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: A massive slump

One of the regions that has experienced most warming over the second half of the 20th century is the Potter Peninsula on King George Island in Antartica. It is here that Marc Oliva and his collaborators are studying what the effects of the warming conditions on the geomorphological processes prevailing in these environments.

“Permafrost is present almost down to sea level in the South Shetland Islands, in Maritime Antarctica” says Marc, “in some recent deglaciated environments in this archipelago, the presence of permafrost favours very active paraglacial processes”.

Permafrost is defined as the ground that remains frozen for periods longer than two consecutive years and constitutes a key component of the Cryosphere. However, it is not fully understood how it reacts to climate variability. In this sense, there is an on-going effort to improve our knowledge on these topics by carrying out long–term monitoring of permafrost, as well as of geomorphological processes, in order to better understand the response of the terrestrial ecosystems to recent warming trends.

This weeks’ Imaggeo on Mondays picture shows a massive slump and the exposed permafrost in the shoreline of a lake in Potter Peninsula (King George Island, Maritime Antarctica). Following the deglaciation of this ice-free area paraglacial processes are very active transferring unconsolidated sediments down-slope to the lake.

Slump-permafrost, Potter Peninsula, Antarctica. (Credit: Marc Oliva via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Slump-permafrost, Potter Peninsula, Antarctica. (Credit: Marc Oliva via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Imaggeo is the EGU’s open access geosciences image repository. Photos uploaded to Imaggeo can be used by scientists, the press and the public provided the original author is credited. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. You can submit your photos here.