GeoLog

EGU Journals

Geosciences Column: Thunderstorm asthma, the unexpected impact of lightning storms on pollen allergies.

Geosciences Column: Thunderstorm asthma, the unexpected impact of lightning storms on pollen allergies.

In October 2015 a series of massive thunderstorms rolled across the Eastern Mediterranean. In the hours and days that followed many people living along the Israeli coast had to go to their nearest medical centre because they were experiencing respiratory problems, which appeared very similar to asthma. But what could have caused these breathing problems? Well in research recently published in Natu ...[Read More]

The inaugural EGU webinar: EGU journals and Open Access publishing

The inaugural EGU webinar: EGU journals and Open Access publishing

Last week the EGU executive office debuted something new for our members: the EGU webinar. The first of these focused on the open access journals that EGU publishes in partnership with Copernicus.The webinar discussed the interactive public peer review system, the role of the EGU Publications Committee, how researchers can effectively publish in an EGU Journal and the new EGUsphere.   The web ...[Read More]

Geosciences Column: Landslide risk in a changing climate, and what that means for Europe’s roads

Geosciences Column: Landslide risk in a changing climate, and what that means for Europe’s roads

If your morning commute is already frustrating, get ready to buckle up. Our climate is changing, and that may increasingly affect some of central Europe’s major roads and railways, according to new research published in the EGU’s open access journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. The study found that, in the face of climate change, landslide-inducing rainfall events will increase in fr ...[Read More]

Geosciences Column: How fast are Greenland’s glaciers melting into the sea?

Geosciences Column: How fast are Greenland’s glaciers melting into the sea?

The Greenland ice sheet is undergoing rapid change, and nowhere more so than at its margins, where large outlet glaciers reach sea level. Because these glaciers are fed by very large reservoirs of ice, they don’t just flow to the coast, but can extend many kilometres out into the ocean. Here, the ice – being lighter than water – will float, but remain connected to the ice on the mainland. This phe ...[Read More]