GeoLog

early career researchers

Join the EGU Blog Network!

Join the EGU Blog Network!

After announcing earlier this week that we are sadly saying goodbye to the EGU network blog Between a Rock and Hard Place, the time has come to find a new blog to take their place. If you are an Earth, planetary or space researcher (a PhD student, an early career scientist, or a more established one) with a passion for communicating your work, we’d like to hear from you!

We currently feature blogs in palaeontology (Green Tea and Velociraptors), international development (Geology for Global Development), geochemistry (GeoSphere), atmospheric sciences (Polluting the Internet), and more! Initially, we are looking to fill the gap left in the network by Between a Rock and Hard Place, which covered broad themes within volcanology and petrology. But, with so much great geoscience out there, we’d love to receive blog proposals from more fields within the Earth, planetary and space sciences we don’t yet feature on the network. This also means we may not limit the addition to the EGU network to one blog; if there is more than one strong candidate we’ll consider expanding the network further.

The network aims at fostering a diverse community of geoscience bloggers, sharing accurate information about geoscientific research in a language understandable not only to fellow scientists but also to the broader public. You, as an expert in your own research area, are in a better position than we are to share recent development in your area of research.

The benefits: apart from your site gaining exposure by having its posts listed on the front page of the EGU website, we will also share highlights of your work on our social media channels (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+) and advertise the blog network at our General Assembly, which has over 12,000 attendees. And, of course, you’ll get to join a great community of bloggers!

With the exception of An Atom’s-Eye View of the Planet, the network blogs are authored by early career researchers. In this call for bloggers we are particularly keen to add diversity to the network, and particularly welcome applications from more established scientists.

Having an existing blog is not a requirement for application. However, if you don’t have a blog already, we’d like you to have at least some experience of writing for a broader audience, be it as a guest blogger, or contributing to outlets such as The Conversation, for instance. In this case, let us know what you’d like your blog to be called, what topics you would cover, and link to articles you’ve published in the past.

If you’d like your blog (or blog idea) to be considered for our network, fill out this form by 11th September.

Join the EGU Network blogs . Credit: ClkerFreeVectorImages (distributed via  pixabay)

Join the EGU Network blogs . Credit: ClkerFreeVectorImages (distributed via pixabay)

Please note that only blogs in English will be considered, as this is the EGU working language, and the language of the blog network. We particularly encourage applications from all European countries, not just English-speaking countries, but bloggers from outside Europe can also apply.

Feel free to contact the EGU Communications Officer Laura Roberts if you have any questions. In the meantime – happy blogging!

GeoTalk: Wouter Berghuijs, Union Level Early Career Scientist Representative

GeoTalk: Wouter Berghuijs, Union Level Early Career Scientist Representative

The EGU offers a platform for early career scientists (ECS) to become involved in interdisciplinary research in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, through sessions, social events and short courses at the annual General Assembly in April. One of the ways of ensuring that the voice of the Union’s ECS membership is heard is via the division early career scientist representatives.

Feedback gathered by the division representatives is collected by the Union level representative, who takes it to the EGU’s Programme Committee (PC) – the group responsible for organising the EGU’s annual General Assembly and the EGU Council – which is in charge of the overall management of the Union.  At the 2015 General Assembly (GA), Wouter Berghuijs, took on the role of union level Early Career Scientist Representative; a post he will hold until April 2016. In this instalment of GeoTalk, Wouter will tell us more about the ECS membership and how he hopes to make a difference to the community during his one-year term.

Before we get stuck in, could you introduce yourself and tell us a little more about yourself and your career?

My name is Wouter Berghuijs. I am a PhD student in Hydrology at the University of Bristol (UK). Prior to moving to Bristol, I gained an MSc and BSc in Civil Engineering at Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands). During my MSc, I spent three months at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA) for a research stay, and a further three months at the University of Bristol. I have been involved with the EGU since 2013, first as the Young Scientist Representative for the Hydrology Division, and since the GA in 2015 as the Union-wide Early Career Scientist Representative (editors note – Council approved having the newly elected representative to have a Union-wide role, rather than just represent the ECS membership at the Programme Committee level).

In my day-to-day research I am interested in what factors drive hydrological differences between places. Instead of studying one place in detail, I compare several hundred catchments (surface area that drains rainfall into a river, lake or reservoir) located in different landscapes and climatic regions. The aspects of hydrologic behaviour I look at can range from floods to droughts, and from short-term dynamics to multi-decadal averages. With a large part of hydrological science consisting of case-studies at individual locations, findings are difficult to transfers to other places. The comparative approach brings in opportunities to develop generalisations and expose patterns that would not be observed when a single catchment is studied in isolation.

For those readers who might not be so familiar with the Union’s ECS membership, could you explain the main idea behind it and your role as Union Level Early Career Scientist Representative?

Approximately one quarter of the Unions’ membership consists of scientists in the early stages of their career. EGU wants to provide support to this group, which has different needs compared to more established scientists. Therefore EGU supports these members by providing reduced conference fees, recognising outstanding students, awarding travel grants, organising short-courses, arranging networking possibilities and more.

Instead of going for a top-down (senior members decide all) approach, EGU decided to appoint Early Career Scientists Representatives for all their scientific divisions. These representatives serve as the link between the ECS members and the board of the different divisions. It is their task to ensure ECS needs are met, both at the Assembly and throughout the year. Other ECS members with questions, comments and thoughts can get in touch with them to ensure their opinion is represented within their division.

In my position of Union level Early Career Scientist Representative, I gather information from each of the division representatives and bring it to the EGU’s Programme Committee – the group responsible for organising the EGU’s annual General Assembly, and the Union’s Council – the board responsible for the overall management and control of the Union.

Some of the ECS Representatives at the most recent General Assembly in Vienna. From left to right, top to bottom: Matthew Agius (SM), Shaun Harrigan (HS),

Some of the ECS Representatives at the 2014 General Assembly in Vienna. Top, from left to right, (in brackets, the Division they represent) : Matthew Agius (SM), Shaun Harrigan (HS), Wouter Berghuijs (ECS Representative), Roelof Rietbroek (G), Matthias Vanmaercke (SSS), Auguste Gires (NP), Nanna B. Karlsson (CR), Bottom (left to right): Ina Plesa (GD), Lena Noack (PS and Deputy Union Level ECS PC Representative), Sam Illingworth (ECS PC Representative , 2013- 2015), Guilhem Douillet (SSP), Anne Pluymakers (TS), Jone Peter (stand-in for Beate Krøvel Humberset, ST).

Why do you feel passionately about the ECS community?

The nice part of working for the ECS community is that relatively small contributions can make huge difference to people’s research career. For example, the ability to attend a conference due to an awarded travel grant can be really important to meet other people in your field and create exposure for your research. It sounds somewhat cliché, but the ECS members are the future of geoscience. An investment now in one of these members can be important for the next 40 years.

Additionally, with the recent appointment of ECS representatives it is an interesting task to start shaping how these representatives can best contribute to the Union, and can make sure they voice the opinion of a broad group of ECS members. With a significant part of the members being ECS it is a nice challenge to change this group from being mostly consumers of activities, to explicitly having them contributing at an organisation level.

What is your vision for the EGU ECS community and how do you hope to drive change during your year long position?

Sam Illingworth (on the left) handing over the batton of the ECS Community over to Wouter at EGU 2014. Image Credit: Roelof Rietbroek, ECS Representative for the EGU Geodesy Division.

Sam Illingworth (on the left) handing over the batton of the ECS Community over to Wouter at the EGU General Assembly, 2014. Image Credit: Roelof Rietbroek, ECS Representative for the EGU Geodesy Division.

Last year Sam Illingworth was the PC Early Career Scientist Representative and made a great start to bringing all ECS together and voice their opinion to Council. My first task is to continue this work. The relative short appointment (1-year) makes it difficult to ensure both short-term and long-term improvements to the Union are made. Short-term improvements involve, for example, dealing with the feedback that provided suggestion for improvement of next years’s GA. During the year I have regular Skype meetings with all ECS representatives, and it is then my task to make sure the outcomes are discussed during e.g. the programme committee meeting (where the plans for the upcoming GA are usually set out), and council meeting later this year.

Recently, the name used to refer to early researchers across EGU was changed from Young Scientist to Early Career Scientists. Could you tell us a little more about what brought about that change and its significance?

One of the findings of the 2014 Young Scientist Survey and Forum at the GA was that early career scientist did not identify with the term young scientists due to the age connotations associated with the name. ECS benefits were considered important during the onset of academic career, independent of the age of the person. The ECS Representatives put together a proposal promoting for the name change which was brought to the EGU Council; who voted in favour of the renaming. It highlights the bottom-up nature of the organisation and how early stage scientists can make a difference in the Union.

The past General Assembly, saw a record number of short courses take place and the growth of networking opportunities and ECS specific activities. What further changes can the ECS look forward to for the 2016 conference?

The young scientists' lounge at EGU 2014. Credit: Stephanie McClellan/EGU

The young scientists’ lounge at EGU 2014. Credit: Stephanie McClellan/EGU

The short courses and ECS specific activities have been very popular at this year’s EGU, and they are definitely a keeper. I don’t think these activities should increase in number, as it is not the intention to lure away the ECS from the regular parts of the scientific meeting; it is important that they also integrated as best as possible with the more established members of their divisions.

The goal for next year is mostly to maintain the activities that were a success, try a few new concepts for those sessions that didn’t work so well. There are also several improvements that can be made such as the capacity of the rooms of short courses and their timing compared to the rest of the programme.

How can those wanting to, get involved with the EGU?

EGU is a versatile organisation; besides organising their Annual General Assembly and running 17 peer-reviewed open access journals, EGU is busy with Topical meetings, education, and various forms of outreach. Because all these aspects are run by members there is always need for motivated people with refreshing ideas. If the ideas you have (or you want to develop) relate to your division, you should contact the respective ECS representative. If the ideas are broader ranging than your division, a good start is to contact me as the Union Level ECS representative.

You can also check the EGU volunteering pages, where you’ll find information on the helping out the EGU in their activities year round. Additionally, the EGU Blogs, from the EGU offical blog GeoLog, through to the Network and Division Blogs, welcome guest contributions; so if you’d like to report from an Earth science event, conference or fieldwork, or comment on the latest geoscientific developments and write about recently published findings in peer-reviewed journals you might consider sharing your thoughts on the Blogs. For more information or to submit a post, click here or get in touch with the EGU Communications Officer, Laura Roberts Artal.

Meet the experts: The future of solar-terrestrial research

Meet the experts: The future of solar-terrestrial research

This year’s General Assembly saw more Short Courses than ever before! With many of the 50 courses on offer having been organised by and/or for early career scientitst, there was no excuse not to pick up some new skills. In this guest blog post, Jone Peter Reistad a PhD candidate at the University of Bergen, outlines the details of a session which explored what the future might hold for research in the Solar- Terrestrial sciences. With active discussion between established and early career scietists this course was no doubt a hit.

During the General Assembly a new short course took place: Meet the Experts – The Future of Solar-Terrestrial Research. In this session, three senior scientists as well as two Early Career Scientists (ECS) were invited to talk about their visions for the future of the Solar-Terrestrial sciences. They were given the difficult task of identifying important challenges within their field of expertise that the present young scientists need to address in the future.

The speakers came from the different communities within the solar-terrestrial division. This included the solar-, heliospheric-, and the near Earth space communities. They all did an outstanding job in pointing out challenges and knowledge gaps within their field.

Starting at the Sun, Louise Harra, Professor of solar physics at University College London, pointed out how much more we know today due to all the recent solar missions. She assured us that more is definitely to come, as new missions are already in the pipe-line, and encouraged the young scientists to get involved in these future missions at an early stage. She had lots of ideas of what to look for with more precise instruments, and pointed out that a key to understand the evolution of the structures observed at the surface of the Sun is to be able to model the evolution of the structures below the surface using helioseismology.

From the Heliospheric community, emphasis was put on the more recent ability to track evolution of hot gases all the way from the Sun to the Earth. Alexis Rouillard, researcher at the French National Centre for Scientific Research, told us that the recent satellite missions had contributed to strengthen the bonds between the Solar and Heliospheric communities so that the two now uses a more common terminology. This was a tendency he very much hoped to see continuing into the future.

The crucial link to Space Weather applications is the ability to predict the orientation of the magnetic field originating from the Sun when it reaches the Earth. This is by far the most uncertain factor in modeling the geomagnetic impact of a solar storm. Rouillard discussed how having a satellite closer to the Sun could possibility enhance our understanding of this propagation and hence revolutionise space weather predictions in the future.

Yuri Shprits, speaking at the session about the  future of solar-terrestrial research. (Credit:  Christer van der Meeren, Birkeland Centre for Space Science, University of Bergen)

Yuri Shprits, speaking at the session about the future of solar-terrestrial research. (Credit: Christer van der Meeren, Birkeland Centre for Space Science, University of Bergen)

Space Weather – the impact on the near Earth space from the outside – was also discussed from a more Earth-centered perspective. Communication through space-based instrumentation becomes increasingly important as more and more infrastructure is becoming dependent on satellite communications. A detailed knowledge of the mechanisms that influence our communications are therefore more important now than ever. Yuri Shprits, researcher at MIT and UCLA, emphasized that the Earths radiation belts is a key region, and that there are still open questions regarding their buildup and loss mechanisms.

This short course was a result of feedback from last years survey among Early Career Scientists in EGU. The short courses at EGU was highlighted as one of the most important activities that was directly targeting the ECS’s. As each division in EGU has their own ECS representative, you can influence the division specific activities for young scientists by contacting your respective ECS representative. Visit https://www.egu.eu/young-scientists/ for more information about the Early Career Scientist activity within the EGU.

 

By Jone Peter Reistad, PhD Candiadte at the University of Bergen.

Seeking young scientists! A great opportunity to get involved in the EGU

Young scientists make up a significant proportion of the EGU membership and it’s important to us that your voices get heard. One way to do this is by getting in touch with your division’s young scientist representative, or better yet, putting yourself forward as a young scientist representative for your division.

Young scientist representatives are a vital link between the EGU and the young scientist community. They are crucial in providing feedback from students and early career researchers, so that we can take action to improve our young scientist activities at the EGU General Assembly and maintain our support for young scientists throughout the year.

As well as giving you the platform to interact with a large network of researchers in your field, being a young scientist representative is a great opportunity to build on your communications skills, boost your CV and influence the activities of Europe’s largest geoscientific association.

Within each scientific division, representatives can also take on a variety of tasks, according to their areas of expertise and interest. These can include (but aren’t limited to): organising events for young scientists at our annual General Assembly, outreach to young scientists and the wider public through social media or a division blog, or establishing a mentoring programme for other young scientists. For a first-hand account of what it’s like to be a young scientist representative, see this article by the Natural Hazards Division representative, Jennifer Holden.

Interested? The divisions currently looking for a young scientist representative are:

If your division isn’t listed here, but you would still like to get involved, contact your young scientist representative – to find them see the structure page in your division’s website.

If you are interested in being a young scientist representative, or have any questions about getting involved in the Union, please contact the EGU Communications Officer Sara Mynott at mynott@egu.eu.

More information for young scientists, including resources, events and opportunities at the General Assembly, is available on the EGU website: http://www.egu.eu/young-scientists/