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June GeoRoundUp: the best of the Earth sciences from around the web

June GeoRoundUp: the best of the Earth sciences from around the web

Drawing inspiration from popular stories on our social media channels, as well as unique and quirky research news, this monthly column aims to bring you the best of the Earth and planetary sciences from around the web. 

Major story  

While May’s headlines may have been dominated by the Kilauea Volcano’s recent eruption in Hawaii, the science news world directed its attention to another volcanic event early this month. On June 3, Guatemala’s Volcán de Fuego erupted, sending plumes of volcanic ash several kilometres into the air. The volcano also unleashed an avalanche of hot gas and debris, otherwise known as pyroclastic flows, more than 10 kilometres down the volcano’s flanks onto the surrounding valley.

The Volcán de Fuego has been an active volcano since 2002, however, this latest event has been the volcano’s most violent eruption in more than four decades.

By 23 June, officials reported that the eruption has killed 110 people from surrounding villages, with hundreds more missing or injured.

Both Kilauea and Fuego gained international attention this year, but the two volcanoes exhibit very different behaviours by nature.

Kilauea is a shield volcano, with a relatively gradual slope and a highly fluid lava flow that can travel far distances compared to other volcanic archetypes. While the volcanic eruption’s lava, ash and haze present real threats to nearby communities, very few injuries have been reported.

“Lava flows rarely kill people,” said Paul Segall, a professor of geophysics at Stanford University, to the New York Times. “They typically move slow enough that you can walk out of the way.”

The Fuego volcano on the other hand is a stratovolcano, characterised by a cone-shaped peak built by layers of lava and ash. This type of volcano usually contains more viscous magma, meaning the hot liquid material has a sticky, thicker consistency. This type of fluid in volcanoes “clogs their plumbing and leads to dramatic explosions,” says Smithsonian Magazine.

Stratovolcanoes like Fuego also often release pyroclastic flows. These plumes can be a major threat to human health and make this kind of volcano particularly dangerous. “On its surface, a pyroclastic flow looks like a falling cloud of ash. But if you could peer into the cloud, you would find a really hot and fast-moving storm of solid rock,” reported PBS NewsHour.

Paul Rincon, a science editor for BBC News notes that pyroclastic flows can reach speeds of up to 700 kilometres per hour and are extremely hot, with temperatures between 200 to 700 degrees Celsius.

As of June 17, Guatemalan authorities have officially stopped looking for bodies and survivors. However, some local rescue workers have kept on with their search. 

What you might have missed

Meanwhile this month, in a vastly different part of the world, scientists have uncovered a wealth of new insight into Antarctica and how the region’s ice melts. Some of the discoveries made known are very foreboding while others more uplifting.

Let’s start with the bad news first. A study published this month in Nature revealed that Antarctica is melting faster than ever, and the continent’s rate of ice loss is only accelerating.

The report explains that before 2012 the Antarctic ice sheet steadily lost 76 billion tonnes of ice each year, contributing 0.2 milimetres to sea-level rise annually. However, since then, Antarctica’s rate of ice loss has increased threefold. For the last fives years the ice sheet has shed off 219 billions tonnes of ice each year. This ice loss now corresponds to a 0.6 milimetre contribution, making Antarctica one of the biggest sources of sea-level rise.

The largest iceberg ever recorded broke away from the Antarctic Peninsula in 2017. Pictured here is the iceberg’s western edge. (Credit Nathan Kurtz/NASA)

This record pace could have a devastating impact around the world, the researchers involved with the study say.

“The continent is now melting so fast, scientists say, that it will contribute six inches (15 centimeters) to sea-level rise by 2100,” reports the New York Times.

The articles continues: “’around Brooklyn you get flooding once a year or so, but if you raise sea level by 15 centimeters then that’s going to happen 20 times a year,’ said Andrew Shepherd, a professor of earth observation at the University of Leeds and the lead author of the study.”

On the other hand, one study published this month in Science offers a glimmer of hope, suggesting that a natural geologic process may help counteract some of the Earth’s sea level rise.

A team of researchers found evidence that, in response to losing ice mass, the ground underneath melting ice sheets naturally lifts up, and more substantially than scientists had previously believed. This process could help prevent further ice loss by land locking vulnerable ice sheets.

Scientists say that many ice sheets in the West Antarctic are at risk of collapsing, and furthermore contributing to sea level rise, because they are in direct contact with the ocean. The relatively warm seawater can melt these glaciers from underneath, making these giant frozen masses more at risk of losing a substantial amount of ice.

However, the new research on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet finds that as these ice masses lose weight, the ground underneath springs up, acting much like a memory-foam mattress.

“This adjustment of the land once the weight of the ice has been lifted is known as ‘glacial isostatic adjustment,’” says Carbon Brief. “It is usually thought to be a slow process, but the new data suggests the ground uplift beneath the [Amundsen Sea Embayment] area is occurring at an unprecedented rate of 41mm per year.”

A press release from Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands goes on to say that “the measured uplift rate is up to 4 times larger than expected based on the current ice melting rates.”

While this discovery offers a brighter view to the serious state of Earth’s melting ice, scientists still caution that this natural grounding process may be rendered useless in extreme cases climate change with extensive ice loss.

Links we liked 

The EGU story

For the first time, we gave participants at the annual EGU General Assembly the opportunity to offset the COemissions resulting from their travel to and from Vienna.

We are happy to report that, as a result of this initiative, we raised nearly 17,000 EUR for a carbon offsetting scheme. The Carbon Footprint project the EGU is donating to aims to reduce deforestation in Brazil and “is expected to avoid over 22 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent greenhouse gas emissions over a 40 year period.”

Do you enjoy the EGU’s annual General Assembly but wish you could play a more active role in shaping the scientific programme? Now is your chance! Help shape the scientific programme of EGU 2019.

From now until 6 Sep 2018, you can suggest:

  • Sessions (with conveners and description),
  • Short Courses, or;
  • Modifications to the existing skeleton programme sessions

Plus from now until 18 January 2019, you can propose townhall meetings. It’s important to note that, for this year’s General Assembly, session proposals for Union Symposia and Great Debates are due by 15 August 2018

And don’t forget! To stay abreast of all the EGU’s events and activities, from highlighting papers published in our open access journals to providing news relating to EGU’s scientific divisions and meetings, including the General Assembly, subscribe to receive our monthly newsletter.

How to convene a session at the General Assembly… in flow charts!

How to convene a session at the General Assembly… in flow charts!

Convening a session at a conference can seem daunting, especially if you are an early career scientist (ECS) and a first-time convener. At the 2018 General Assembly, Stephanie Zihms, the Union-level ECS representative, discussed the basics of proposing, promoting and handling a session in the short course ‘How to convene a session at EGU’s General Assembly.’

In today’s post she has created some simple flow charts to ensure your convening experience is a success. With the call for sessions for the 2019 EGU General Assembly open until 6 September 2018, now’s the perfect time to put this advice into practice!

Did you know that you can help shape the General Assembly by proposing a session?

Follow the flow charts to find out more:

After the session submission deadline, the Programme Committee will look for duplicate sessions and encourage sessions to merge before the call for abstract opens. Once sessions are open for abstract submission, it is then up to you and your convener team to ensure your session is advertised. Try publicising your session as widely as possible. Why not spread the word through social media, mailing lists or even a blog post?

Remember, scientists who would like to be considered for the Roland Schlich travel support have to submit their abstracts by 1 December 2018, prior to the general deadline, to allow for abstract assessment.

Also remember that ECS can apply to be considered for the OSPP (Outstanding Student Poster and Presentation) award. Judges are normally allocated by the OSPP coordinator, but as a convener you need to check each entry has been awarded judges.


Once the general deadline closes, your responsibilities as convener or co-convener depend on the type of session and the number of abstracts. EGU’s conference organisers, Copernicus Meetings, will keep you updated via email and more information about your responsibilities can be found here.

Note that the EGU considers all General Assembly contributions equally important, independent of presentation format. With this in mind, if your session is given oral blocks, make sure your oral slots include presentations from early career scientists as well as established scientists. It’s also a good idea to ensure your diversity selection goes beyond career stage and includes gender and nationality.

As the convener (or co-convener) you need to ensure all abstracts submitted for the Roland Schlich travel support are evaluated and the feedback is provided through the online tool. This should be done as a team.

The minimum number of submitted abstracts required for a session varies each year. This often depends on the type of session requested (oral, poster, PICO) and overall amount of abstracts submitted.

Not all conveners attract the required number of abstracts for their session of choice, but don’t worry. If this happens to you, there are other options available, like converting to different session type or teaming up another session. The EGU Programme Committee works hard to make sure all abstracts are presented at the General Assembly in sessions that are as suitable to them as possible.

Remember, the call for sessions for the EGU General Assembly 2019 closes on 6 September 2018 and the call for Union Symposia and Great Debates proposals ends by 15 August 2018.

By Stephanie Zihms, the Union-level ECS Representative

The EGU’s 2019 General Assembly, takes place in Vienna from 7 to 12 April, 2019. For more news about the upcoming General Assembly, you can also follow the official hashtag, #EGU19, on our social media channels.

Uploading your 2018 General Assembly presentation

Uploading your 2018 General Assembly presentation

This year it is, once again, possible to upload your oral presentations, PICO presentations and posters from EGU 2018 for online publication alongside your abstract, giving all participants a chance to revisit your contribution  hurrah for open science!

Files can be in either PowerPoint or PDF format. Note that presentations will be distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Uploading your presentation is free of charge and is not followed by a review process. The upload form for your presentation, together with further information on the licence it will be distributed under, is available here. You will need to log in using your Copernicus Office User ID (using the ID of the Corresponding Author) to upload your presentation.

Presentations and posters will be linked to their corresponding abstracts. If your presentation didn’t have an abstract (this is the case for short courses and others), but you still want to share it with the wider community you can consider uploading your presentation to slideshare or figshare as a PDF to share it instead.

All legal and technical information, as well as the upload form, is available until 17 June 2018 at: http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/egu2018/abstractpresentation

At the Assembly 2018: Friday highlights

At the Assembly 2018: Friday highlights

The conference is coming to a close and there’s still an abundance of great sessions to attend! Here’s our guide to getting the most out of the conference on its final day. Boost this information with features from EGU Today, the daily newsletter of the General Assembly – pick up a paper copy at the ACV entrance or download it here.

Union Sessions

The final day of the conference kicks off with the last Union session, Scientific research in a changing European Union (EU): where we stand and what we aim for (US5). Panelists will explore some of the challenges and potential threats to academics in the EU and how these issues can be addressed and overcome. The session will also outline some of the advantages of the EU, funding programmes that are currently provided and how the European Union can continue to develop and nurture its researchers.

Medal Lectures

Be sure to also attend the last two medal lectures of the assembly:

Short Courses

The last leg of short courses offers insight into new technologies, tips for publishing your work, and advice on how to develop your career. Here are a few of the short courses you can check out today:

Scientific Sessions

The three final interdisciplinary events also take place today. Early in the morning a series of talks will discuss biogeomorphology: conceptualising and quantifying processes, rates and feedbacks. Another session will explore medical geology, an emerging field of science that is dealing with the impact of natural geological factors, process and material on humans and animals health. Our final interdisciplinary event will explore sea-level changes from minutes to millennia, highlighting proxy records for constraining our understanding of present and future sea-level change

It’s your last chance to make the most of the networking opportunities at the General Assembly, so get on down to the poster halls and strike up a conversation. If you’re in the queue for coffee, find out what the person ahead is investigating – you never know when you might start building the next exciting collaboration! Here are some of today’s scientific highlights:

Today we also announce the results of the EGU Photo Contest! Head over to the EGU Booth at 12:15 to find out who the winners are.

What have you thought of the Assembly this week? Let us know at www.egu2018.eu/feedback and help make EGU 2019 even better.

We hope you’ve had a wonderful week and look forward to seeing you in 2019! Join us on this adventure in Vienna next year, 7–12 April 2019.