GeoLog

Biogeosciences

Imaggeo on Mondays: Namibia’s mysterious fairy circles

Imaggeo on Mondays: Namibia’s mysterious fairy circles

The grassy Namibian desert is pock-marked with millions of circular patches of bare earth just like these shown in the picture between linear dunes.

Viewed from a balloon, they make the ground look like a moonscape. Commonly known as fairy circles, the patches range from two to 12 metres across and appear in a 2000 kilometre strip that stretches from Angola to South Africa.

For many decades, the fairy circles extending uniformly over vast areas in the landscape, have puzzled laymen and scientists alike. They are subject to a lively debate and contrary hypotheses on their origin exist. Some researchers claim fairy circles were caused by termites, others propose they are the result of vegetation self-organization.

Description by Hezi Yizhaq, as it first appeared on imaggeo.egu.eu.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Arctic cottongrass in Svalbard

Imaggeo on Mondays: Arctic cottongrass in Svalbard

In the High Arctic, where vegetation is limited in height, cottongrass stands out as some of the tallest plant species around.

This photo shows a wispy white patch of Arctic cottongrass growing amongst other tundra vegetation in the Advent river floodplain of Adventdalen, a valley on the Norwegian archipelago island Svalbard.

Svalbard is of particular scientific interest as it is a relatively warm region for its high latitude. This is due to the North Atlantic Ocean, which transports heat from lower latitudes to Svalbard’s shores.

The photo was taken in September 2014, towards the end of the region’s growing season. In the background, you can see that the season’s first snow had already blanketed the valley’s neighboring mountain tops.

Cottongrass generally loves wet conditions and scientists sometimes even use this plant genus (Eriophorum) as an indicator of the ground’s fluctuating water level, especially in areas that begin to develop peat, an accumulation of more of less decomposed plant material in wet environments. The waters feeding this region’s wetland come from melted snow and ice travelling down the adjacent mountains and floodwater from the Advent river, which is primarily meltwater fed.

Arctic cottongrass also can exchange gases with their underground environment through their roots and even have been shown to alter the local carbon budget of regions where they grow. It is therefore a very important species to account for when studying permafrost carbon dynamics.

Gunnar Mallon, currently a teaching fellow at the University of Sheffield (UK), took this photo while on a fieldwork expedition together with Andy Hodson, a glaciology professor at the University Centre in Svalbard, for the LowPerm project.

The LowPerm project aimed to understand how nutrients are transported within permafrost landscapes in Norway and Russia and how that may affect the production of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). The study brought together scientists from the UK, Norway, Denmark and Russia and results from the extensive field and laboratory work are currently being analysed and made ready for publication.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Iceland’s original birch forest

Imaggeo on Mondays: Iceland’s original birch forest

Iceland is a country of dramatically rugged landscapes. The region is home to sweeping valleys and mountain ranges, dotted with lava fields, large glaciers, hot springs and impressive waterfalls.

The territory is also notoriously treeless. As of 2016, forests only made up 1.9 percent of Iceland, according to the Icelandic Forest Service. However, about a thousand years ago the country’s landscape was far more vegetated, and remnants of Iceland’s original woodlands still exist today.

It is a common misconception that Iceland is too cold to sustain a forest. “On the contrary, it has been observed that, at the time of human settlement, birch woods and scrubs have covered large parts of Iceland,” said Marco Cavalli, a researcher at the Research Institute for Geo-Hydrological Protection in Italy and the photographer of today’s featured image. In fact, Iceland’s fossil evidence suggests that, before human settlement, 25-40 percent of the island was dominated by woodlands and thickets.

When humans migrated to the island about 1100 years ago, much of Iceland’s natural forests were chopped down to make way for fields and pastures. In the centuries following human settlement, intensive sheep grazing and volcanic eruptions prevented forests from regenerating. By 1950, less than one percent of the country was covered by trees.

Iceland’s vegetation-devoid state presents an environmental problem to local Icelanders, since the lack of trees, combined with the island’s volcanic activity, has left the land vulnerable to severe soil erosion. Since the soil conditions prevent vegetation from taking root, erosion has limited farming and grazing efforts. Iceland’s loose soil and strong winds are also responsible for damaging sandstorms.

Soil conservation and forestry services have made substantial efforts to repopulate the Icelandic environment with trees, just about doubling Iceland’s tree cover since the mid-20th century. However, there is still a long road ahead to reach the Icelandic Forest Service’s goal to see 12 percent of Iceland afforested by 2100.

This picture was taken by Cavalli while on a field trip in Rangárvellir, a southern region of Iceland near Gunnarsholt, the headquarters of the Soil Conservation Service of Iceland (SCSI). The workshop focused on the area’s severe degradation from both human activities and natural causes, and efforts to restore the ecosystem.

During the workshop he spotted this particular grove of dwarf birch trees. “I was impressed to see a small remnant patch of the Icelandic original birch forest resisting all these adverse conditions,” said Cavalli. “I would say this is a good example of nature fighting to survive.”

References

Forestry in a Treeless Land, Icelandic Forest Service

Changes in vegetation cover from the time of Iceland’s settlement, Icelandic Institute of Natural History

Vikings Razed the Forests. Can Iceland Regrow Them?, The New York Times

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.