GeoLog

EGU Guest blogger

This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

Imaggeo On Monday: Transit of Venus over the Sun

Imaggeo On Monday: Transit of Venus over the Sun

The object of this photo is the transit of planet Venus in front of the Sun which took place on June 6th 2012 and was the last event of this kind until 2117! This is a very rare event with respect to a human life span and the transit always happens in pairs, 8 years apart, with a repeatability of more than two centuries. The picture was captured on the shore of the Black Sea, in Vama Veche, Romani ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Space plasma in a jar

Imaggeo On Monday: Space plasma in a jar

Laboratory visualisation of solar wind interaction with Earth’s magnetic field. The Van Allen radiation belt, Earth’s magnetosphere, “bow shock” and a solar coronal hole can all be seen, and are emphasized with the ‘Planeterrella experiment‘, a vacuum chamber in the shape of a bell jar with the ‘Sun’ on the left (in the form of a large metallic sphere) and the ‘Earth& ...[Read More]

GeoPolicy: Europe’s Waste Policy – using Incinerator Bottom Ash and reducing landfill

GeoPolicy: Europe’s Waste Policy – using Incinerator Bottom Ash and reducing landfill

Although you may not realise it, waste and the circular economy is an important topic for many geoscientists. Our consumption drives the need for resources and sustainable resource extraction, while disposing and reducing this waste requires a wide range of expertise and impacts the environments in which many scientists undertake their research. On a more personal level, understanding what happens ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Catching a glimpse of the Mesosphere

Imaggeo On Monday: Catching a glimpse of the Mesosphere

In the midst of summer when the sun does not set at high latitudes one can sometimes catch a glimpse of the mesosphere shortly after sunset or before sunrise. These thin veils, known as noctilucent clouds, are the highest known cloud-like structures forming at about 80km above the surface. At this height, they are still lit by the sun and can be seen from lower latitudes many hundreds of kilometer ...[Read More]