GeoLog

EGU Guest blogger

This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

Imaggeo On Monday: Lichtenberg Figure Visualisation

Imaggeo On Monday: Lichtenberg Figure Visualisation

A visualisation of an electrical charge moving through plastic. Machines are used to discharge electricity onto surfaces then metallic powders are used to visualise the static. The image is then exposed onto a photopolymer plate and etched with ink. Is is called the photogravure process.   Description by Nicolas Strappini, after the description on imaggeo.egu.eu.   Imaggeo is the EGU’s o ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Tides at Young Sound

Imaggeo On Monday: Tides at Young Sound

The work of the autumn tides at Young Sound, Northeast Greenland, created a fine sand artwork just before the freezing in of the fjord with the approaching winter. Due to the changing sediment of the nearby Zackenberg river, the local coastal erosion is an object of great recent investigations.   Description by Maria Scheel, after the description on imaggeo.egu.eu.   Imaggeo is the EGU’s ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Aurora Australis with Southern Cross and Pointer stars

Imaggeo On Monday: Aurora Australis with Southern Cross and Pointer stars

This view from the Port Hills of Christchurch in New Zealand glances South over Governors Bay into the distance, where an Aurora Australis is visible near the horizon. Almost in the center of the starry sky the Southern Cross with its 2 Pointer stars are showing prominently.   Description by Ulrich Schreiber, after the description on imaggeo.egu.eu.   Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open acc ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Increasing Moon – seen from Hamburg

Imaggeo On Monday: Increasing Moon – seen from Hamburg

The image shows the increasing moon on March 16, 2016, seven days before the full moon. 53.3% of the lunar front are already illuminated. The moon does not glow on its own, but its surface reflects the sunlight. The sun always illuminates a complete half of the moon, which, in its orbit around the earth, always turns its face (which we see at full moon) toward the earth.   The reason for the ...[Read More]