GMPV
Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology
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Franziska Keller

Franziska Keller is PhD student at the Institute for Geochemistry and Petrology, at ETH Zürich. Her current work focuses on the understanding of long-term petrological cycles in silicic calderas of Japan applying different petrological and geochronological techniques.

‘Job’ alert! GMPV is looking for a (deputy) early career scientist rep!

‘Job’ alert! GMPV is looking for a (deputy) early career scientist rep!

The Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology and Volcanology division of the European Geosciences Union is looking for a new Early Career Scientist representative! The current rep will stand down at the General Assembly in 2021, but we’d like some handover time between reps so we’re advertising now with the aim of the incoming rep starting in ~November 2020. They’ll officially be the ...[Read More]

Ask us (almost) anything: how is tuff formed?

Ask us (almost) anything: how is tuff formed?

Tarun Goswami, an archaeologist from India, asks: How is a tuff formed? and more specifically… Why do some deposits have more ash than others? We are paraphrasing – the questions are specifically about the tuffs formed in the Toba supereruption. So… you asked, we answer! First of all, modern definitions generally describe a tuff as a volcaniclastic rock composed of solid volcanic ...[Read More]

That’s us! – The new GMPV ECS Team 2020/2021

That’s us! – The new GMPV ECS Team 2020/2021

Usually our blog posts are about fancy minerals and cool science, but today we want to use this platform to introduce you to our new GMPV ECS team for the term 2020/2021! First of all, what exactly are we doing here in the GMPV ECS team and why are we even existing?! – Well, the GMPV ECS team is a group of young researchers (themselves being ECS), who want to support young scientists at the beginn ...[Read More]

Volcanic Lightning: Impacts on plume-suspended ash particles

Volcanic Lightning: Impacts on plume-suspended ash particles

Volcanic lightning is a common phenomenon related to explosive volcanism, often rattling down in a spectacle of hundreds of lightning strikes within a single eruptive event. Apart from its spectacular appearance, lightning can also be used as helpful tool to detect and monitor volcanic activity in remote locations on Earth and potentially on other planets, and is even questioned to have influenced ...[Read More]