GMPV
Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology
Mike Jollands

Mike Jollands

Mike Jollands is an experimental petrologist at the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, New York, USA. He studies the diffusion and substitution mechanisms of trace elements, making use of high temperature and pressure equipment to simulate volcanic and mantle conditions. www.mikejollands.com

The *real* mineral cup: wavellite vs. kernowite / devon versus cornwall

The *real* mineral cup: wavellite vs. kernowite / devon versus cornwall

Kernowite: In November 2020, approximately two major world events occurred. Firstly, Joseph R. Biden Jr. and his dog Major were elected as the 46th president and president’s dog of the United States of America. Secondly, the International Mineralogical Association approved a new mineral, kernowite, Cu2Fe3+(AsO4)(OH)4⋅4H2O, which was described by M. Rumsey from the Natural History Museum in L ...[Read More]

#vEGU21 Session in the Spotlight: GMPV2.1

#vEGU21 Session in the Spotlight: GMPV2.1

The vEGU21 abstract deadline is approaching as fast as anything happens in 2020 (which is either really fast or really slow, depending on who you are…). Have you chosen a session to submit to? Whatever else happens, we promise this will be the cheapest trip to Vienna you will take all year! Whether you aren’t stressed at all (like a passive margin), or super stressed (like a collision ...[Read More]

Ask us (almost) anything: how is tuff formed?

Ask us (almost) anything: how is tuff formed?

Tarun Goswami, an archaeologist from India, asks: How is a tuff formed? and more specifically… Why do some deposits have more ash than others? We are paraphrasing – the questions are specifically about the tuffs formed in the Toba supereruption. So… you asked, we answer! First of all, modern definitions generally describe a tuff as a volcaniclastic rock composed of solid volcanic ...[Read More]

Ask us (almost) anything: Were Chixculub and Deccan related?

Ask us (almost) anything: Were Chixculub and Deccan related?

Doc Rock from twitter asks Has anyone investigated the hypothesis that the Deccan Traps basalt flows came after, and were the result of, the Chixculub impact event, based on the DT basalts being on the exact opposite side of Earth at the time of the event? For context, the Chixculub crater is buried under the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico, and resulted from a meteorite impact that is widely believed ...[Read More]