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Geomorphology

New remote geomorphology seminar series “Landscapes Live” beginning 28 May 2020

New remote geomorphology seminar series “Landscapes Live” beginning 28 May 2020

The current pandemic has highlighted the difficulties of keeping up-to-date with new developments in our field when travel is not possible. However, as we work to transition to a greener future and make our community better serve the needs of all scientists regardless of international mobility, it is important to find ways to share current research remotely.

Landscapes Live is a new remote seminar series focused on sharing exciting geomorphology research throughout the international scientific community. The remote format allows for free, planet-conscious, and pandemic-proof attendance by anyone who is interested. Talks will take place using the Zoom meeting software.

Talks will happen during the academic year in blocks of 5-6 weekly talks, with long breaks in between. The first block will run from 28th May through 25th June 2020, with the next block taking place during the fall 2020 semester.

Each seminar in the first block will be held on a Thursday at 2 pm GMT (4 pm Central European Time). The first block features a fantastic lineup of speakers as follows:

Thursday 28th May at 2 pm GMT: Georgina Bennett, University of Exeter

Thursday 4th June at 2 pm GMT: Anneleen Geurts, University of Bergen

Thursday 11th June at 2 pm GMT: Liran Goren, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

Thursday 18th June at 2 pm GMT: Robert Hilton, Durham University

Thursday 25th June at 2 pm GMT: Fiona Clubb, Durham University

Please visit https://osur.univ-rennes1.fr/LandscapesLive/ for the most up-to-date information, including the links to each Zoom meeting.

Suggestions for future speakers are welcome; please feel free to send names to any member of the organizing committee. We look forward to seeing you (virtually) at Landscapes Live!

Charlie Shobe on behalf of the Landscapes Live organizing committee: Philippe Steer, Vivi Pedersen, Stefanie Tofelde, Pierre Valla, Charlie Shobe, and Wolfgang Schwanghart

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