EGU Blogs

Highlights

SM
Seismology

Earthquake of the month: Simeonof – Alaska M 7.8

Earthquake of the month: Simeonof – Alaska M 7.8

On July 22nd, Alaska was the scene of last month’s largest earthquake, a Mw 7.8 earthquake that hit the Aleutian Islands, offshore the Alaska Peninsula. The hypocenter location, tectonic setting and focal mechanism suggest a megathrust earthquake. The hypocenter of the so called Simeonof earthquake is located at the western edge of the historical 1938 earthquake (M8.3) slip zone, near the Shumagin ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

Locking people up to program — or: “What is a hackathon?”

Locking people up to program — or: “What is a hackathon?”

This week the seventh yearly hackathon of the geodynamics code ASPECT is taking place. But what actually is a hackathon, why is it useful and how did it get started in the first place? This week, Wolfgang Bangerth, one of the founders of ASPECT, explores all these questions for us. Due to the intensity of a hackathon, he wrote this article before the start of the hackathon. It’s really not p ...[Read More]

OS
Ocean Sciences

Research Cruise in times of COVID-19

Research Cruise in times of COVID-19

While the whole world is on stand-by we are in the middle of the North Atlantic and I want to explain you, why! During those crazy times cruise planning also slightly changes. The original plan was to depart and arrive back in Reykjavik which would have only included a short transit to our research area, the OSNAP East section. In the end we had a 9 day transit from our homeport Texel, Netherlands ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: A marvellous sequoia in spring time

Imaggeo On Monday: A marvellous sequoia in spring time

Although more commonly associated with the west coast of the United States, if you visit Cabezón de la Sal in Spain you may come across a stand of giant redwood trees or Sequoia. Around 800 trees were brought to Spain in the 1940s, so are still very young, but even at their young age they are still around 40 meters high! Sequoia groves, as well as being awe-inspiring to look at, provide a uniquely ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

The Sassy Scientist – The Burning Question

The Sassy Scientist – The Burning Question

In the climb on the academic pyramid, Antonia wonders: How do you tell someone “you have not done enough to be included in the co-author list”? Dear Antonia, *arranges Yoda robe*: Big questions you have! Right place you came! I am sure you are not the first or the only scientist with that question. Since I feel generous today, I will leave here a template e-mail you can all copy and pa ...[Read More]

TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

Features From the Field: Pencil Cleavage

Features From the Field: Pencil Cleavage

This edition of ‘Features from the field’ is brought to you by Sandra McLaren, a senior lecturer at the University of Melbourne. She will be talking about type of rock formation called “Pencil Cleavage” so called because it looks like pencils. Sandra even has a small collection of pencil/crayon shale which is the cover image of this post. I have seen quite a range of differ ...[Read More]

Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

Ask us (almost) anything: Were Chixculub and Deccan related?

Ask us (almost) anything: Were Chixculub and Deccan related?

Doc Rock from twitter asks Has anyone investigated the hypothesis that the Deccan Traps basalt flows came after, and were the result of, the Chixculub impact event, based on the DT basalts being on the exact opposite side of Earth at the time of the event? For context, the Chixculub crater is buried under the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico, and resulted from a meteorite impact that is widely believed ...[Read More]

CL
Climate: Past, Present & Future

Breathing life into a d(r)ying lake in northwest Iran

Breathing life into a d(r)ying lake in northwest Iran

Lake Urmia, in Northwest Iran, was once the most extensive and permanent hypersaline lake (salinity >> of ocean) in the world. Since 1995, the lake water level has dropped about 8 m, shrinking to less than 30% of its original surface area and losing more than 90% of its water volume over two decades [1]. Unsustainable water management in response to increasing demand together with climatic e ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

Watch and learn!

List of online seminars

Too envious to watch Netflix’s Selling Sunset? Gone through the top 5 geodynamic movies? Lock-down vacation too boring for words? In need of useful procrastination? Search no longer! We have compiled an extensive list of online webinars and speaker series that were already active pre-Corona or saw the daylight during the pandemic to stay in touch with our colleagues both abroad and next door ...[Read More]