EGU Blogs

Highlights

GD
Geodynamics

Holiday recommendations – blog break summer 2018

Holiday recommendations – blog break summer 2018

Even dedicated workaholics such as the editors of your EGU GD Blog Team sometimes deserve a break! Let me clarify that by saying ‘an intentional break’ (because uploading every Wednesday is hard!). We will be ‘on holiday’ during August, so there won’t be any new blog posts then. But don’t worry: we will be back stronger than ever in September and we already have ...[Read More]

NH
Natural Hazards

Hazard chains: from anthropic oil spills to ecosystem pollution. Can tiny organisms be the solution?

Hazard chains: from anthropic oil spills to ecosystem pollution. Can tiny organisms be the solution?

Hello to everyone. Today I have the personal pleasure to interview Dr. Grégoire Michoud. He is a friend and a brilliant scientist working on ecosystem microbial ecology. In the interview, Grégoire will talk to us about oil spills in the marine system, a specific anthropic hazard that can evolve into a natural hazard with terrible environmental consequences.     Hello Grégoire, please tell us ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Digging out a glacier’s story

Imaggeo on Mondays: Digging out a glacier’s story

This photograph shows landforms on Coraholmen Island in Ekmanfjorden, one of the fjords found in the Norwegian archipelago, Svalbard. These geomorphic features were formed by Sefströmbreen, a tidewater glacier, when it surged in the 1880s. Although all glaciers flow, some glaciers undergo cyclic changes in their flow. This is called surging, and glaciers that surge are called surging glaciers. Dur ...[Read More]

TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

Mind Your Head #4: Job uncertainty in academia – know your strengths and possibilities!

Mind Your Head #4: Job uncertainty in academia – know your strengths and possibilities!

Mind Your Head is a blog series dedicated towards addressing mental health in the academic environment and highlighting solutions relieving stress in daily academic life. In the three previous blog post of this ‘Mind your head’ series, we discussed the importance of communication with fellow ECS, time management, and a healthy relationship with your advisors. However, there is one big source of st ...[Read More]

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

Image of the Week – Stuck in the ice: could it have been predicted?

Image of the Week –  Stuck in the ice: could it have been predicted?

Expeditions in the Southern Ocean are invaluable opportunities to learn more about this fascinating but remote region of the world. However, sending vessels to navigate the hostile Antarctic waters is an expensive endeavor, not only financially but also from a human perspective. When vessels are forced to turn back due to hazardous conditions or, even worse, become stuck in the ice (as shown in ou ...[Read More]

SSP
Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology

You wouldn’t go in the early basement during the upper afternoon, don’t you?

I remember it perfectly. It was 13 years ago, while writing my first manuscript, I was first confronted with that thing that challenges a lot of junior stratigraphers, especially when they are not a native English: Geochronology vs. Chronostratigraphy! Or to simplify, how to properly distinguish time and time-rock units in your writings. Several papers have been published on this subject, out of w ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Preprint power: changing the publishing scene

Preprint power: changing the publishing scene

Open access publishing has become common practice in the science community. In this guest post, David Fernández-Blanco, a contributor to the EGU Tectonics and Structural Geology Division blog, presents one facet of open access that is changing the publishing system for many geoscientists: preprints. Open access initiatives confronting the publishing system The idea of open access publishing and fr ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Wildfires leave their mark on Jasper National Park

Imaggeo on Mondays: Wildfires leave their mark on Jasper National Park

Jasper National Park is the largest national park in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, spanning across nearly 11,000 square kilometres of Canadian wilderness. The park is known for its rugged landscape, extensive trails, and abundance of deer, bighorn sheep, wolves, mountain lions and bears. This region is also very susceptible to blazing wildfires, a result of human activity that began more than a ce ...[Read More]

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

Image of the Week – The future of Antarctic ice shelves

Image of the Week – The future of Antarctic ice shelves

Climate change will increase ice shelf melting around Antarctica. That’s the not-very-surprising conclusion of a recent modelling study, resulting from a collaboration between Australian and German researchers. Here’s the less intuitive result: much of the projected melting is actually linked to a decrease in sea ice formation. Learn why in our Image of the Week… Different types ...[Read More]