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GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: Geometric Microscape of Agate

Imaggeo On Monday: Geometric Microscape of Agate

“Crazy Lace” is an agate collected in Mexico, which offers great opportunities for aesthetic photomicrography. Here we see the common arrangement of fibers of chalcedony (microcrystalline quartz) in parallel bands alternating with black thin layers of Fe oxides. Polarized light photomicrograph, crossed polarizers and red tint plate. width 5.4 mm. Sample kindly provided by Denise M. Har ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: A meander in the meltwater valley

Imaggeo On Monday: A meander in the meltwater valley

At the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet, surface melt releases old layers of dust, that have travelled thousands of years into the ice. Under sunny weather, the dust heats up with radiation, melts the ice underneath, and thus accumulates in tiny potholes and meltwater creeks. However, this photo was taken after a rainy day. The rain triggered increased melt on the surface of the ice irrelevant of i ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: Contorted Streams on the Gates Glacier

Imaggeo On Monday: Contorted Streams on the Gates Glacier

Annual ridges and troughs (called wave ogives) are formed as the ice of the Gates Glacier (in Alaska’s Wrangell Mountains) flows through a steep icefall. Down-glacier, as the ice melts, the rushing meltwater is funnelled into streams, carving ice canyons as it flows, but ultimately directed by these topographic constraints.   Description by Allen Pope, after the description on imaggeo.e ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoRoundup: the highlights of EGU Journals published during December!

GeoRoundup: the highlights of EGU Journals published during December!

Each month we feature specific Divisions of EGU and during the monthly GeoRoundup we will be putting the journals that publish science from those Divisions at the top of the Highlights roundup. For December, the Divisions we are featuring are: Cryospheric Sciences (CR), Soil System Sciences (SSS) and Tectonics and Structural Geology (TS). They are served by the journals: Geoscientific Model Develo ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoTalk: Meet Larissa van der Laan, glaciologist and science-artist!

GeoTalk: Meet Larissa van der Laan, glaciologist and science-artist!

Hi Larissa, thankyou for spending time with us today! To break the ice, could you tell us a little about yourself and your research? Ha, I see what you did there. I’m Larissa, she/her, 29, and a PhD candidate at the Institute of Hydrology and Water Resources Management in Hannover, Germany. I’ve been fascinated by snow and ice since I was little, writing my first ever school report and ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: Ice caves in high altitude karstic areas

Imaggeo On Monday: Ice caves in high altitude karstic areas

High altitude karstic environments often preserve permanent ice deposits within caves, representing a lesser-known portion of the cryosphere. Despite being not so widespread and easily reachable as mountain glaciers and ice caps, ice-caves preserve a great deal of information about past environmental changes and paleoclimatic evolution. Since one of their main characteristics is to have ground-ice ...[Read More]

GeoLog

The European Science-Media Hub: Bringing scientists, journalists and policymakers together

The European Science-Media Hub: Bringing scientists, journalists and policymakers together

This month’s GeoPolicy blog post introduces the European Science-Media Hub (ESMH) along with its key initiatives. It also takes a deeper dive into the organisation through a Q&A that we were thrilled to have with the Head of the European Parliament’s Scientific Foresight Unit Theo Karapiperis and the coordinator of the ESMH Svetla Tanova-Encke.   In 2017, the European Parliament’s Panel f ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Using comics to talk about sexism in science: how ‘Did this really happen?!’ is trying to change the conversation

Using comics to talk about sexism in science: how ‘Did this really happen?!’ is trying to change the conversation

1953: Marie Tharp created a map that showed the seafloor was spreading via the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and therefore proved the theory of plate tectonics, only for it to be dismissed as “”girl talk” by her (male) supervisors. 1968: A few years after winning the Nobel Prize (without crediting her work), James Watson wrote about Rosalind Franklin saying “By choice she did not emphasize her feminine quali ...[Read More]

GeoLog

EGU’s Blog of the Year competition is back! Vote now for your favourite Division blog post of 2021

EGU’s Blog of the Year competition is back! Vote now for your favourite Division blog post of 2021

In yet another year that saw uncertainty and change, one thing has remained a positive constant: the impressive and insightful blog posts published regularly across the EGU’s official blog, GeoLog, and division blogs.   The EGU Division bloggers in particular have been hard at work producing new informative, fun and interesting blog posts for our members both inside their Division, and across ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Top 5 Gifts for Geoscientists (2021 edition!)

Top 5 Gifts for Geoscientists (2021 edition!)

Well it’s that time of year again when many people start looking for seasonal gifts for their loved ones, colleagues and others, but although you may have already sorted your gift for a geoscientist, we are here to help you if you are still looking for inspiration. If you want more ideas check back on our previous gifts for geoscientists suggestions, including last year’s suggestions f ...[Read More]