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Geology for Global Development

Guilty: L’Aquila Earthquake Scientists Sentenced to 6 Years Imprisonment

As a young scientist undertaking research into natural hazards and disaster reduction, I found the decision yesterday to find a number of scientists guilty of manslaughter very worrying. The case against the scientists is centred on the L’Aquila earthquake of 2009 and argues that they were guilty of providing “inexact, incomplete and contradictory” information. There is helpful a ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Friday Photo (53) – Earthquake Emergency Shelter – Lanzhou, China

Lanzhou, China – Earthquake Emergency Shelter Interesting questions about preparedness, local education and awareness were raised on a recent visit to Lanzhou, China, after I was told on a coach from the airport that Lanzhou was not affected by earthquakes. During my visit to the University there, I came across this sign which offered a stark contradiction. Lanzhou regularly experiences smal ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Workshop Advertisement: Dynamics and Impact of Interacting Natural Hazards

The workshop below may be of interest to some of our readers undertaking research into natural hazards, or working within the disaster risk reduction community. Please note that this workshop is not organised by Geology for Global Development: THE DYNAMICS AND IMPACT OF INTERACTING NATURAL HAZARDS  An interdisciplinary workshop on current research and future directions 14th‒15th February 2013 To b ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

International Day for Disaster Reduction: A Challenge to Geoscientists

Today is the start of Earth Science Week, Global Handwashing Day and the UN’s International Day for Rural Women. Tomorrow is World Food Day, and Wednesday is the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. You could write a blog on any one of these, and the role good geoscience can play! Saturday, as some of you may have noticed, was the International Day for Disaster Reduction, and is ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Friday Photo (52) – Taklamakan Desert

We’ve now had a whole year of ‘Friday Photos’ on our old blog and now this new EGU hosted blog. As a special treat today we have not one, but three images from the  Taklamakan Desert and some of the highest sand dunes in China.   Taklamakan Desert, China: Geotourism close to the oasis town of Dunhuang Another example of geotourism in Gansu Province. The dunes and crescent moon la ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Top Travel Tips (6) – Daniel Sharpe

Over the summer we published a very popular series of posts outlining some Top Travel Tips to help those undertaking mapping projects, fieldwork or research visits overseas. We’ve had helpful posts from those who have spent time in various parts of Africa, Bangladesh, and Chile. Good preparation is essential to get the most out of overseas work. It helps our work be more effective, more effi ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

In The News – October 2012

A few things have caught my eye in the news recently, a mix of good and tragic: Toilets in India: The BBC reported last week that the Indian Supreme Court have ordered that every school have clean water and suitable sanitation facilities within six months. If this is obeyed, and goes hand in hand with appropriate hygiene training it could lead to many positive results, as outlined on the Tearfund ...[Read More]

VolcanicDegassing

Montserrat: Open for Business

One of the great privileges of working on volcanoes is that you get the chance to visit some amazing places, and to meet some extraordinary people. Recently, I got the chance to return to Montserrat, a small volcanic island in the Caribbean which has been the site of a dome-forming eruption since July 1995. I had first visited Montserrat in early 1998, when I had a short tour as one of the staff s ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Friday Photo (51) – Loess Collapse/Subsidence

Heifangtai, Gansu Province, China: Collapse in Loess Deposits Ground collapse/subsidence in China, most likely caused by movement of water through the loess deposits from the high relief in the right of this picture, to the low relief in the left of the picture. The scale of the collapse can be seen in relation to the man at the forefront. (c) Geology for Global Development, 2012 For other images ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Lessons from China (3) – Geotourism, A Case Study

In September 2012 I travelled to the Gansu Province of China to take part in the First International Symposium for New Techniques for Geohazards Research and Management. Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been highlighting a number of issues, lessons and experiences from this trip. You can read the short archive of this series here. Future posts will examine areas relating to geohazards, di ...[Read More]