GeoLog

photomicrograph

Imaggeo On Monday: Geometric Microscape of Agate

Imaggeo On Monday: Geometric Microscape of Agate

“Crazy Lace” is an agate collected in Mexico, which offers great opportunities for aesthetic photomicrography. Here we see the common arrangement of fibers of chalcedony (microcrystalline quartz) in parallel bands alternating with black thin layers of Fe oxides. Polarized light photomicrograph, crossed polarizers and red tint plate. width 5.4 mm. Sample kindly provided by Denise M. Har ...[Read More]

Get the picture? How choosing the right photograph can add value to your science communication

Get the picture? How choosing the right photograph can add value to your science communication

If you are a scientist you probably know the value of a good, well designed image. The right graph or diagram can help the reader to really grasp the meaning of a complicated theory or process, help to illuminate a critical piece of data, or highlight a key finding. But whilst much advice exists about how to create effective, accessible images, what about photographs?   In our early training, ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Blue Olivine in an unusual basalt

Imaggeo On Monday: Blue Olivine in an unusual basalt

Blue Olivine set in a matrix of pyroxene, magnetite and plagioclase in a basalt collected by the photographer, Bernardo Cesare, on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, Israel. Polarized light photomicrograph. Crossed polarizers and red tint plate. Width c. 2.7 mm. Who may have been throwing this stone a couple millennia ago?   Description by Bernardo Cesare, after the description on imaggeo.egu.e ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Emoji from meteorites; impact spherule

Imaggeo On Monday: Emoji from meteorites; impact spherule

This is a crossed polarized light photomicrograph of an impact spherule; a small mineralisation made when a meteorite hits the Earth and melts the rock at the point of impact, from Barberton Greenstone Belt, in South Africa. These spherules are the only remnants of Early Earth’s meteorite impact history, from between of 3.2 and 3.5 billion years ago. In this photo you can see the K-feldspar ...[Read More]