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Imaggeo on Mondays: Tasman Lake Down Under 

Imaggeo on Mondays: Tasman Lake Down Under 

The Tasman Glacier Terminal Lake, seen in this photograph, lies in the Aoraki Mount Cook National Park in New Zealand’s south island. The photographer, Martina Ulvrova, stated she “finally got to see the largest glacier in New Zealand after several days of heavy rain, during which the landscape was bathing in mist”.

The Tasman Glacier is 23 km long and is surrounded by a terminal proglacial lake with floating icebergs. The lake was only formed in the 1970s by the melting of the Tasman Glacier. Today the lake is 7 km long and growing faster than ever with its length that is increasing by approximately 180 m per year on average!

This continual lake growth is largely due to the receding glacier which has been retreating since the 1970s and has shrunk by approximately 6 km over the past fifty years. Blocks of ice regularly break-off the flowing glacier and float peacefully on the lake. One can see only the tips of these enormous icebergs with about 90% of the iceberg mass hidden below the surface of the water.

In 2011, after a 6.3 magnitude earthquake, 40 million tonne chunk of ice broke away from the Tasman glacier and plunged into the lake. The collapse of the gigantic block caused a local tsunami with waves as high as three meters bouncing from side to side across the lake for thirty minutes. Scientists expect the Tasman glacier to continue shrinking considerably and warn that it is likely to eventually disappear. Global warming has hit this secret paradise and predictions are alarming.

By Martina Ulvrova

If you pre-register for the 2018 General Assembly (Vienna, 08–13 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 15 January until 15 February, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submittheir photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Just Passing

Imaggeo on Mondays: Just Passing

If lucky enough to visit Ilulissat Icefjord, you’d find yourself in a truly ancient landscape. From the up to 3.9 billion year old Precambrian rocks, to ice dating back to the Quaternary Ice Age (2.6 thousand years old) and archaeological remains which evidence the past settlement of this remote Greenlandic outpost, it’s no surprise this stunning location has been declared a UNESCO world heritage site.

Today’s Imaggeo on Mondays photograph was taken by Camille Clerc, at Sermermiut, an old inuit settlement at the mouth of the Ilulissat Icefjord. Located 1,000 km up the west coast of Greenland, in the Bay of Disko Bugt, 250 km inside the Arctic Circle, the icefjord is the sea mouth of Jakobshavn Glacier – one of the few glaciers on Greenland which reaches the sea. Confined either side by ancient Precambrian rocks, the icefjord forms a narrow, 3-6 km wide tidewater ice-stream, where vast amounts of meltwater and ice from the Greenland ice-sheet reach the sea.

Jakobshavn (also known as Sermeq Kujalleq) is Greenland’s fastest moving glacier. Huge chunks of ice break off the glacier front via Ilulissat Icefjord in a process known as glacier calving. Annually, over 35 km3 of ice is calved into the sea; equivalent to 10% of the production of all Greenland calf ice and more than any other glacier outside Antarctica! As a result, there is an almost constant production of icebergs, which vary in size from small lumps to bergs which can exceed 100m height. As they make their way towards the sea, the icebergs actively erode the fjord bed, slowly changing its morphology over time.

The tragic sinking of the Titanic on its maiden voyage, as a result of a collision with an iceberg on the night of the 15th April 1912, is part of modern history and was even portrayed in a Hollywood blockbuster. Could one of the mighty icebergs calved from Jakobshavn via Ilulissat Icefjord, be the culprit of the sinking of the White Star Line vessel? Pinpointing the exact location from which the glacier was calved is tricky. Most icebergs found in North Atlantic waters originate from the western coast of Greenland. They are pushed slowly towards more northerly latitudes by the West Greenland Current and then forced towards the Atlantic, hugging the coast of Canada, by the Labrador Current, eventually making their way to the Gulf Stream, along one of the world’s busiest shipping routes. The journey there is long and more often than not, the icebergs take such battering during the voyage that their original size is much diminished.

 

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: A solitary floating island

With 2014 officially named the hottest year on record, there is evidence of the effects of rising global temperatures across the globe. The solitary, shimmering iceberg in today’s Imaggeo on Mondays photograph is a reminder that one of the best places to look for evidence of change is in glaciers. Daniela Domeisen tells the story of this lonely frozen block of ancient ice.

Iceberg on Tasman glacier lake. Credit: Daniela Domeisen (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Iceberg on Tasman glacier lake. Credit: Daniela Domeisen (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The picture shows an iceberg on Tasman glacier lake in the Southern Alps of New Zealand, in the centre of Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park. The lake consists of melt water from the Tasman glacier, which calves into the lake at its far end. The glacier is one of the largest in New Zealand and flows along New Zealand’s highest peaks, Mt Tasman and Mt Cook.

As most glaciers on Earth, the glaciers in Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park are retreating at a fast pace. The lower parts of the Tasman glacier are at less than 1000m above sea level and are therefore melting especially fast. The Tasman glacier lake has formed over the past two to three decades and has in the meantime reached a length of several kilometers. It is projected to almost double in size as the glacier retreats further.

Icebergs constantly calve from the Tasman glacier into the lake and drift down the lake, driven by a weak current towards the lake’s outflow while melting in the process. The ice contained in the icebergs is several thousand years old, beautifully transparent and clean when looking at a single piece of it.

The pictured iceberg was about 10 meters wide. From its shape, and melting pattern, it is likely that it had turned to its side after calving into the lake. With some force it was possible to tip the smaller icebergs and see a shiny blue surface which had been beautifully polished by the water.

On the lake, everything was completely peaceful and quiet, except for the distant sound of a continuous rippling and trickling coming from the moraines on the sides of the lake, as pictured in the background of the photo. Stones and rocks of various sizes slid down and fell into the lake as the ice inside the moraines melted in the bright, sunny and warm January weather.

The changes which are observed in most places as a result of the changing climate are often either too slow to be observed or invisible to the naked eye. The glacier, its lake and icebergs, however, are continuously changing, and a couple of hours spent on the water give a lively impression of a quiet place where things are changing fast enough to be able to observe a notable difference between the time one enters and leaves the place. The beauty of the glacier and its lake with the glittering icebergs provide a spectacular glimpse of a transient place.

By Daniela Domeisen, Research Analyst, MarexSpectron, London

If you pre-register for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Iceberg at midnight

Standing on the vast expanse of gleaming white sea ice of the Atka Bay, Michael Bock took this stunning picture of an Antarctic iceberg. The days, during the Antarctic summer, are never ending. Despite capturing the image at midnight, Michael was treated to hazy sunlight.

Icebergs at midnight. Credit: Michael Bock (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Icebergs at midnight. Credit: Michael Bock (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

“Clearly visible [in the iceberg] are the annual snow accumulation layers which illustrate how the ice archive works.; as you look down the icy face, the ice gets older,” explains Michael. As more snow accumulates on the surface of the glacier, the underlying layers of snow are compressed by the weight from above, hence layers become thinner with increasing depth. On the ice shelf or on the Antarctic plateau these accumulation layers can only be seen when digging a snow pit. The obvious limitation of this is that only a few meters can be excavated with spades, limiting the observations one can carry out. Instead, to gain information about what happens deep within the ice pack, drill cores are usually used. Long cores of the layers of ice can be extracted , providing useful data. “One can drill into the ice (typically on the Antarctic plateau on ice divides or domes) reaching down to bedrock, with the retrieved ice core revealing long records of climatic history,” adds Michael. Deep ice cores can be more than 3000 m long. Depending on e.g. annual mean temperature and accumulation rate the age and resolution of these archives can vary greatly. Whilst this iceberg cannot be studied directly due to hazards associated with working underneath it does “serve as a beautiful visualisation of what we are searching for in ice core science”, explains Michael.

By Laura Roberts Artal and Michael Bock.

If you pre-register for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.