GeoLog

Geochemistry

Imaggeo on Mondays: Sampling sulfurous sinkhole water

Imaggeo on Mondays: Sampling sulfurous sinkhole water

Sampling of water present in sinkhole formed in superficial salt-rich lacustrine deposits at Ghor Al-Haditha, Dead Sea eastern shore, Jordan, during a field campaign in October 2018. The water in this sinkhole flows into the Dead Sea in a surface stream channel formed in 2012. The water was highly acidic and extremely conductive, with a strong sulfurous odour. Understanding the chemistry of the wa ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: Setting trees aflame to understand the carbon balance of fires

Imaggeo on Mondays: Setting trees aflame to understand the carbon balance of fires

Smoke clears after an experimental wildfire in Australian eucalyptus forest carried out for carbon balance estimations of wildfires. We meticulously measured the carbon in all leaves, twigs, logs and bark in a forest block about 35km east of Manjimup and then they set it on fire with help from the Dept. of Parks and Wildlife, [Western Australia]. We the counted the carbon all over again including ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: The colourful sinkhole clusters at Ghor Al-Haditha

Imaggeo on Mondays: The colourful sinkhole clusters at Ghor Al-Haditha

Sinkholes that form on the Dead Sea shore at Ghor Al-Haditha, Jordan, often occur in clusters, with many holes packed into a small area. However the visual appearance of neighbouring sinkholes can vary significantly. Mineral precipitation in the foremost sinkhole in this picture, which has no fresh water supply, gives it a garish pink-orange colouration. The larger hole behind has a groundwater-de ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: Electron cloud gone wrong

Imaggeo on Mondays: Electron cloud gone wrong

Deciphering the past history of rocks and what they might reveal about the Earth’s future is a key part of geology, and tools such as Ion Probes can be used by Earth Scientists to extract valuable information about a rock’s past. Today’s Imaggeo on Monday’s image was acquired by Sarah Glynn, a researcher at the University of the Witwatersrand, in South Africa, who was analysing a potential calcite ...[Read More]