GeoLog

#EGUblogs

The EGU Network blogs are looking for guest contributions

Are you a budding science writer, or want to try your hand at science communication? You might just be the person for our EGU network bloggers! A number of our network blogs would like to give their pages a bit of a boost and are seeking guest bloggers to contribute new, informative and engaging posts on an ad hoc basis.

If you’ve recently been thinking about trying your hand at blogging, but aren’t sure if it’s for you or simply have a great story or research that you’d like to see ‘in print’, why not give guest blogging a try? Read on to find out which blogs are looking for contributions.

Four Degrees

4degreesWritten by Flo Bullough and Marion Ferrat , Four Degrees, looks at environmental geoscience issues from a science for policy perspective. Environmental geochemistry, climate change, policy and sustainability are brought together in this blog and explored at the interface between science and society.

Flo and Marion are looking for guest contributions, but would also be happy to welcome a more regular blogger to their team. So if you are interested in geoscience and policy and are looking for the opportunity to get into some regular science writing, fill out this form and Flo and Marion will be in touch soon!

Geology for Global Development (GfGD)

GfGDGfGD is a UK-based organisation, working to support young geologists to make an effective contribution to international development. The network blog is a place for the organisation to share articles, discussions, photographs and news about the role of geology within sustainable development and the fight against global poverty

Blog editor, and founder of the organisation, Joel Gill, has his hands full running the blog, the organisation and completing his PhD. As a result, the blog is particularly looking for guest contributions which explore the principles of international development and how the earth sciences can make a difference. Take a look at the blog for some inspiration and pitch your ideas to Joel using this form.

Geology Jenga

JengaA broad range of topics find their way into the posts of Geology Jenga, with authors Dan Schillereff and Laura Roberts Artal writing about all things science communication, their careers as budding academics, as well as the science behind geophysics and geomorphology.

However, since finishing their PhDs, the demands of their 9 to 5 jobs mean that Dan and Laura have less time to write and would welcome guest contributions on any of the topics above. If you’d like to contribute to the blog, why not get in touch with them using this form?

GeoSphere

GeoSphereThe term geosphere is an all-encompassing word that incorporates just about every aspect of the earth sciences. This means that topics ranging from geophysics to geochemistry to geobiology are part of the geosphere. The blog Geosphere honours its namesake by covering any and every topic in the geosciences. However, with blog author, Matt Herod’s research interests in geochemistry and hydrogeology you’ll likely find more posts on these topics.

Matt aims to make science clear for anyone that should stumble upon the geosciences and enhance awareness of the geosphere. If these goals resonate with you, then you writing for the Geosphere blog might just be the thing for you. Why not get in touch with Matt using this form?

Polluting the Internet

PollutingWill Morgan, an atmospheric sciences researcher from the University of Manchester, blogs at Polluting the Internet. Focusing on tiny particles suspended in our atmosphere, called aerosols, which can build up and pollute our skies. In the blog, Will explores current research in aerosol science, as well as his fieldwork exploits in pursuit of these tiny particles.

If this is your area of research too and you’d like to contribute a guest blog post on the subject, why not give it a go! You can get in touch with Will by filling out this form.

Green Tea and Velociraptors

GreenWhilst swamped by the writing of the thesis, Jon welcomes guest contributions to his blog too. Covering the subject of palaeontology as well as regularly writing about science communication and the open science movement, the blog has a diverse readership and offers a great platform for anyone how has something to say about these topics. Get in touch with Jon using this form.

The network blogs cover a range of topics in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, with the aim to foster a diverse community of geoscientist bloggers. If you’d like to submit a guest blog post, please fill out the forms available above. For general guest blogging guidelines, please refer to the submit a post page on the EGU official blog GeoLog.

Science bloggers – join the 2015 General Assembly blogroll!

Science bloggers – join the 2015 General Assembly blogroll!

Will you be blogging at the 2015 General Assembly? If so, sign up here and we’ll add you to our official blogroll. We will be compiling a list of blogs that feature posts about the EGU General Assembly and making it available on GeoLog, the official blog of the European Geosciences Union.

We’d ask you to write posts that relate directly to the Assembly during the conference in Vienna (12 – 17 April). The content of each blog on this list is the responsibility of the authors and is not sanctioned by the EGU, but we will make details of all the blogs on the General Assembly blogroll available online.

If you would like your blog to feature on our list, please submit your blog details to us.

In addition to the wealth of interesting new research that will be presented at the scientific sessions, the Media and Communications team have organised press conferences to highlight some of this research to the press and media participants at the conference. The press conference programme will be available a few weeks before the start of the General Assembly. Should you spot something there that might inspire you to blog, it might be useful to know that there are limited spots available upon request for scientists who are bloggers or science writers who may wish to attend press conferences. Please email EGU Media and Communications Manager Bárbara Ferreira at media@egu.eu before 10 April if you are interested.

With free (and open!) wireless internet and plugin points available throughout the building and great science throughout the week; we’ve got everything you need to get blogging! International plug adapters can even be borrowed from the Austria Center Information Desk!

GeoLog will also be updated regularly during the General Assembly, featuring posts about scientific sessions, conference highlights and interviews with scientists at the meeting. Please contact the Communications Officer, Laura Roberts Artal, for any questions you might have about the blogroll.

 

GeoTalk: Flo Bullough from Four Degrees

This week in GeoTalk, we’re talking to Flo Bullough  Policy Assistant at the Geological Society who writes about both climate and policy at Four Degrees 

Hi Flo, why don’t you tell us a bit about yourself and how you got into science communication? 

I would say that science communication is something I have always done in my academic studies without having labelled it as such. I deliberately chose research topics that had a wider impact than the core research alone and I was always interested in disseminating my work more widely than the department or my supervisor. My work has always involved environmental and development issues (in water contamination and geochemistry) because I found that having a human angle or a real world application was an interesting driver. Now, in addition to the blog, in my role as a Policy Assistant I get to write documents for parliamentarians and the wider public disseminating geological information in an accessible way. Effective communication of science is a really rewarding part of the job, and when you have the potential to impact on policy; it’s a great incentive to get it right.

You recently started a series called “what’s geology got to do with it?” to show geoscience is relevant even when you might not expect it to be. How is geology relevant to society? 

For me, I think the question is almost how is it not relevant? Geology and its many sub-disciplines influence either directly or indirectly almost everything we use in our daily lives or that we see in the environment around us. In a very basic sense, geology relates to fundamental natural resources such as rocks, metals, water and fossil fuels. These sit at the base of the manufacturing industry and are important in terms of utilities, public services and just about anything you can think of. Their use, scarcity and extraction is also linked to many social, cultural and political situations which have direct links with the social sciences. It’s no secret that resource scarcity and climate change are going to have a threat multiplier effect on many of the biggest political & cultural issues we face around the world. I’m an advocate for approaching things in an interdisciplinary way and the more we highlight the interdependence and connectedness of different issues, the more widely these links will be understood.

Meet Flo! (Credit: Flo Bullough)

Meet Flo! (Credit: Flo Bullough)

In addition to blogging, you work full time as a Policy Assistant at the Geological Society of London, how do you keep on top of the latest research and policy developments? 

In the age of social media and widespread information generation and distribution, ‘staying on top’ of research and policy in its entirety is virtually impossible. At the Society, we are fortunate to have numerous and willing fellows who have expertise in an enormous variety of areas and so their input on current issues and responses we make is invaluable. We also have our own publishing house and an extensive events schedule that helps me keep on top of new research. So between those, the science media and social media I try to keep abreast of as much as possible.

Position statements are incredibly useful references for policymakers and stakeholder organisations. What goes into writing one? 

Position statements are an important part of our work and our interaction with the wider community and so understandably a lot of work goes into them. Hefty documents like the Society’s Climate Change statement have an expert working group made up of specialists from the fellowship who survey the current research before meeting to write the statement itself. The Geological Society doesn’t take a position on issues but instead strives to provide the best possible scientific evidence from the geological record and geoscience community, in order to promote the understanding of relevant scientific evidence to a wide range of decision-makers and stakeholders. Whether written by a working group or by Society staff like me, the document goes through a series of edits with experts in the field before being finalised.

Do you have any tips for scientists who what to bridge the gap between science and policy? 

I think science and policy is a fascinating subject but can be a difficult area of interest to access so I’ve collated a series of useful resources to feed even the most esoteric interest!

In political centres such as London there is a raft of evening talks and events that are often free – I would recommend attending! There is a Policy area on the Geological Society website which details all recent work we’ve been engaged in. As well as the Geological Society, the following institutes and departments are a good source of information and events:

There are also many publications and social media outlets which have a focus on science and policy, and the CaSE (Campaign for Science and Engineering) website is a great portal for news, events, blogs and jobs and details ways to get involved with science policy.

Flo’s recommended reading:

Feeling Inspired? Peruse Flo’s ponderings on climate and geoscience policy at: https://blogs.egu.eu/4degrees/.

GeoTalk: Will Morgan on podcasts and polluting the internet

This week in GeoTalk, we’re talking to Will Morgan, atmospheric scientist, podcaster and the blogger behind Polluting the Internet

You recently joined the EGU blog network, but you’ve been writing for a while now. What got you blogging?

I guess the ultimate reason is that I enjoy talking about science! I’ve been involved with a number of science communication activities for a few years and blogging is a very popular medium that I wanted to try out. I’ve read scientific blogs since my undergraduate days but the number and range of sites has exploded in recent years. I felt that I would be able to contribute to this and cover aspects that don’t always get as much attention. Aerosol particles might be tiny but they can have big impacts and we have a lot to learn about how they affect our climate and our health.

Will Morgan

Will Morgan. (Credit: Will Morgan)

There’s a wealth of great research out there, how do you choose what to write about?

Mainly through a combination of Twitter, RSS feeds for journals in my field and whatever I happen to be doing that week. Twitter is great for getting ideas, whether that is a new study that has been getting attention in the media or just some spectacular satellite images that routinely appear in your timeline. Scientific conferences are also really helpful for getting ideas as you can cover something “new” that emerges while you are there.

In addition to your science blogging activities, you also run a podcast, together with a host of atmospheric scientists. How did you get started?

As with many ideas in science, the podcast started out with a discussion in a pub. A couple of friends in the atmospheric science group at Manchester thought “wouldn’t it be fun to do an atmospheric science podcast”. They talked to a few of us in the research group and we started getting together to record some episodes and it has continued from there.

You do a lot of podcasting and blogging at conferences and other scientific events, what would you say are the biggest benefits to the public or wider scientific community?

I think it helps to give people an idea of how the process of science actually works – most of the time people see scientists as a talking head on the TV or a few quotes in an article. I’ve found covering conferences a lot of fun as they are often very vibrant affairs with lots of ideas whirling around between groups of passionate people, which maybe isn’t the picture that is usually painted of scientists! I/we have also covered how we go about making measurements in the field, which communicates the challenges of actually doing science and the dedication that is required to do things well. People seem to enjoy listening or reading to these things also, so catering to that audience is really important.

Do you have any tips for people pondering podcasting?

The main tip is to just get on with it and not worry if it doesn’t sound perfect. Most modern mobile phones have the capability to record audio so you can give it a try and put it online (there several free services, such as Podbean for podcasting online). It isn’t going to have the audio quality of a BBC Radio 4 broadcast but that is secondary to the actual content. From there you can develop where you want to go with the podcast and if funds and/or facilities allow, you can get access to better recording equipment or even a studio. Also, the more you do it, the better you get. My only other tip is to not spend too long listening to recordings of your own voice when editing (ideally edit content that you weren’t involved with) as you’ll quickly develop a complex – it was a bit of a shock when I realised that the booming Brian Blessed-esque voice was my own!

Want to know more about what Will’s been up to? Have a read: https://blogs.egu.eu/hazeblog/