GeoLog

EGU General Assembly 2019

GeoTalk: “Grown-ups are not focusing on the plastic problem, not as much as I want them to”

GeoTalk: “Grown-ups are not focusing on the plastic problem, not as much as I want them to”

Lucie Parsons, a ten-year old girl from the small village of Walkington, in England, is on a personal mission to save the environment from plastic pollution. After seeing on the BBC Blue Planet II documentary how litter in the ocean is damaging ecosystems, she decided to take action. Now she gives talks and is co-researcher in her mother’s PhD on climate change and the youth voice. Lucie has come to the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna with her mother, Katie Parsons, to tell scientists that children want to be involved in addressing environmental issues.

Unless the flow of plastics and industrial pollution into the world’s oceans is reduced, marine life will be poisoned by them for many centuries to come.

David Attenborough, The Blue Planet II: Episode 4, BBC One

 

How did you learn about the impact of plastic pollution in the oceans and marine life?

L: Through Blue Planet. I saw an episode about a whale and her calf, and how the contamination poisoned the whale’s milk. When I saw that I got really, really upset so I wrote a poster about it. Then I asked my mummy and daddy to photocopy it so that I might be able to put it around the village. I read and watched documentaries to learn more, and I found out that it is a big problem. I wanted to do something about it.

So you started giving talks… 

L: Katy Duke, the head of the [aquarium] Deep in Hull, got in touch with daddy because she saw my poster.

K: I tweeted Lucie’s poster to show what she had done after she was so moved by the documentary. The CEO of the Deep saw that and contacted us to ask if Lucie would like to give the opening talk at the European Union of Aquarium Curators Conference, which the Deep were due to host.

What do you tell people in your talks?

L: I have done two conferences and talks, also at schools. I have also been interviewed for the radio and profiled by the Earth Day Network. In my talks I basically tell people how bad the problem is, what it is doing to the animals and what they can do to help.

Here at the EGU General Assembly people were really touched by your presentation. Do you think your talks make people take action? 

K: Gilles Doignon, from the European Commission for Environment, was really moved about what Lucie had said at the Deep. He promised her that he would get the aquariums to sign up to a plastic pledge.

L: And he managed to do it.

K: He said that, thanks to Lucie, thousands of turtles will be saved. This is where she got her inspiration from to carry on. If she can talk and say the things she has done, even if just one or two people do something about it, that creates a knock-on effect.

Why do you think children should be involved in the fight against climate change?

L: Children are the next generation; when they get older they will take over the work grown-ups have done. So they should start now. Children can do the same things as grown-ups, there is not really a difference with helping, you need to get as many people to help as you can get.

K: Getting schools and individual children involved in science will make it real and manageable, part of life. Otherwise much science ends up in dusty journals. We need people to live it and understand it.

Are grown-ups doing enough?

L: I think they should be doing a tiny bit more. They are not really focusing on the problem, not as much as I want them to.

You have talked to politicians before, why do you think it is important to talk to scientists also?

K: When Lucie was affected by Blue Planet she luckily had me and her dad to help her. But other children will have their passion stopped unless they have an adult who supports them. Some schools don’t do environmental education, it is not within many curriculums, and some parents might not carry on informing their children.

There is amazing science going on and some scientists who communicate get through to the children. There is a youth rising at the moment. Children are interested, they want to know and they want to be involved. But, how? Scientists have to continue feeding the information to the children and involve them in citizen science so they will carry on with that passion.

What can people do to help?

L: Inform other people, go on litter picks and map the areas where they found the litter to help prevent more litter. With my friends and my family, we have cleaned three areas so far in my village and we are mapping them to feed in the data about where we found the litter. Also, stop using single-use plastics.

Is there any other documentary, book or podcast you would recommend to people who want to learn about plastic pollution in the oceans?

L: Drowning in Plastic. We have watched about three quarters of that.

K: You are enjoying that, aren’t you?

L: Yes… Well, I wouldn’t say we are enjoying it.

Interview by Maria Rubal Thomsen, EGU Press Assistant

First evidence of microplastics on mountain glaciers

First evidence of microplastics on mountain glaciers

We tend to think of glaciers as spotless pristine settings. But “if plastic is everywhere, why not on the surface of glaciers?” This occurred to Roberto Sergio Azzoni, a professor of environmental science and policy at the University of Milan in Italy, who decided to find the answer to this question for himself. At the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna, Azzoni and his team presented the first evidence ever of microplastic contamination on alpine glaciers.

The study was conducted on Forni Glacier, one of the largest valley glaciers in the Italian Alps. The beautiful ice sculpted valley, home to World War I historical sites and a  popular hiking route, attracts hundreds of trekkers and alpinists every year. Assuming on-site human activity could be a source of pollution, the team decided to collect the first sediment samples there.

It turns out they were right: the results showed that the samples contained on average about 75 particles of microplastic per kilogram of sediment. This level of contamination is comparable to what is observed in marine and coastal areas in Europe. Extrapolation of this data suggests that there may be between 131 and 162 million plastic particles present on the surface of Forni Glacier, fibers and fragments combined.

The precise origin of the particles is hard to define. Likely, some of the pollution had been carried by air masses from densely urbanized areas surrounding the Alps. However, researchers think most of the plastic has a local origin, since the most common polymer found in the samples was polyester, a component used in technical clothing and equipment for hikers.

For that very reason, in order to avoid contaminating the supraglacial sediment samples during the field campaign, research participants wore only 100% cotton clothes and wooden clogs, a challenging outfit for hiking a glacier.

In order to avoid contaminating the supraglacial sediment samples researchers had to wear 100% cotton clothes and wooden clogs. (Credit: Roberto Sergio Azzoni)

Now, the team plans a follow-up study that will classify the plastic particles more precisely and help determine the origin of the pollutants.

This current study also opens the door to new research on how microplastic contaminants on the surface of alpine glaciers disperse when the ice melts. Although Forni Glacier does not feed drinking water sources down valley, in other locations fibers and fragments could enter the trophic chain and impact ecosystems.

Azzoni notes that hopefully this preliminary study will increase public interest on the topic and raise awareness of the fragility of glaciers. Human activity is producing long-lasting changes to the Earth’s surface that will affect many generations to come, now we can confirm that mountain glaciers are not an exception.

By Maria Rubal Thomsen, EGU Press Assistant

In Vienna for the weekend? Here’s a taste of what’s on offer…

In Vienna for the weekend? Here’s a taste of what’s on offer…

The General Assembly has come to an end, with only a few hours left to go. Many of the participants will make their way home over the weekend, but if you’ve chosen to stay on for a little longer, then this list of cultural activities and things to do in Vienna might just be the ticket!

Have coffee, Vienna style

Experience the true delights of Viennese coffee at Cafe Prükel. Strong and delicious – even better with a slice of your favourite cake. http://www.prueckel.at/

Immerse yourself in Austrian artwork

Experience the work of Gustav Klimt, one of Austria’s most famous painters in a special exhibition on his work. https://www.belvedere.at/Beyond_Klimt

Explore the city by bike

One of the best ways to see Vienna is by bike – there’s no shortage of great tours around the city. Better yet, hire your own and take a trip along the Danube. https://www.vienna-unwrapped.com/vienna-tours-by-bike/

An evening of space science

Enjoy a mega space science celebration at Vienna’s Natural History Museum. Celebrate the first human in space and 50 years since the Moon landing with a talk from ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer. https://der-orion.com/aktuell/termine/orion-termine/1617-yuri-s-night-2019?fbclid=IwAR1kGPGKSujeoyhr9kVMacWTqVpsXKdTSFTlpEMziOmUqIsN7SElumMDk-o

Cafe Prückel, Vienna, Austria. (Credit: Andreas.poeschek by CC-BY-SA-2.0-at via Wikimedia Commons)

Seasonal markets – Easter

Visit one of the seasonal Easter markets where you can watch artists at work, see Easter decoration from different countries and snack on Austrian specialities.

http://www.visitingvienna.com/sights/eastermarkets/am-hof-ostermarkt/

Vienna Blues Spring – a Musical Festival

Enjoy some of the best local and international blues musicians. http://www.visitingvienna.com/entertainment/events/blues-spring/

Discover the work of modernist female artists

“City of women” is a long overdue exhibition of the works of Viennese artists that made a significant contribution to the artistic scene in Austria between 1900 and 1938. https://www.belvedere.at/city_of_women

Pritzker winner architecture

Explore modern architectural wonders designed by Pritzker winners such as Jean Nouvel, Zaha Hadid and the Herzog & de Meuron duo. https://www.wien.info/en/sightseeing/architecture-design/by-nobel-prize-winners

By Sara Mynott, Anastasia Kokori and Maria Rubal, Press Assistants at the EGU General Assembly