GeoLog

Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology

Imaggeo on Mondays: Huts in Arcachon Bay

The Tchanquees Huts in the Arcachon Bay by Yann Vitasse, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

The Tchanquees Huts in the Arcachon Bay by Yann Vitasse, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

Yann Vitasse, now a researcher at the Institute of Botany, University of Basel in Switzerland, got a wonderful present in 2009 for completing his PhD: a flight on an ultralight aircraft above the southwest coast of France. It was then he took this stunning photo of the Arcachon Bay, a water area near Bordeaux that is fed by the Atlantic Ocean and by a number of fresh waterways.“Here you see the famous Tchanquees Huts which were built on stilts in the middle of the Arcachon Bay, on the bird island. These huts were originally used for monitoring oyster beds,” Vitasse said.

The photo was taken at low tide, a time when the water covers an area of only 40 square kilometres. By comparison the bay takes up some 150 square kilometers at high tide, when the entire area to the left of the huts is covered by sea water.

The bird island, starting to the right of the huts, also varies in area being some 10 times larger at low tide. Geologists are still out on the origin of this structure. Some defend it is a former sandbar while others prefer the theory that it formed from the remains of a high dune shaped by the wind and the ocean.

Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union. Every geoscientist who is an amateur photographer (but also other people) can submit their images to this repository. Being open access, it can be used by scientists for their presentations or publications as well as by the press. If you submit your images to imaggeo, you retain full rights of use, since they are licenced and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

EGU General Assembly 2012 Call for Papers

Abstract submission for the EGU General Assembly 2012 (EGU2012) is now open. The General Assembly is being held from Sunday 22 Apr 2012 to Friday 27 Apr 2012 at the Austria Center Vienna, Austria.

You can browse through the Sessions online.

Each Session shows the link Abstract Submission. Using this link you are asked to log in to the Copernicus Office Meeting Organizer. You may submit the text of your contribution as plain text, LaTeX, or MS Word content. Please pay attention to the First Author Rule.

The deadline for the receipt of Abstracts is 17 January 2012. In case you would like to apply for support, please submit no later than 15 December 2011. Information about the financial support available can be found on the Support and Distinction part of the EGU GA 2012 website.

Further information about the EGU General Assembly 2012 on it’s webpages. If you have any questions email the meeting organisers Copernicus.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Oasis Valley

Oasis Valley, Nevada, USA. Image by Jean-Daniel Champagnac, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons License.

This picture has been taken from the air (small plane) during fieldwork in Alaska during 2009. Oasis valley is located between frontal lobes of Fan and Bremner glaciers (143.57°W; 60.87°N). The orange colour is from sand that have been brought in by the glaciers, and carved by rivers.

Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union. Every geoscientist who is an amateur photographer (but also other people) can submit their images to this repository. Being open access, it can be used by scientists for their presentations or publications as well as by the press. If you submit your images to imaggeo, you retain full rights of use, since they are licenced and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Tethys Himalaya

Tethys Himalaya in Zanskar, Jammu & Kashmir. Image by Pierre Dèzes, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons License.

Tethys Himalaya are one of the zones of the Central Himalayan Domain (CHD), which is one of the tectonic zones of the Himalaya. The Tethys Himalaya is approximately 100 km wide large fold (syncline) with superimposed smaller folds (this is known as a synclinorium). The Tethys Himalaya contains a stratigraphic record which indicates the geological history of this part of the Indian continent.

This image shows Palaeozoic and Triassic sediments of the Tethys Himalaya in Zanskar, Jammu & Kashmir. The orange cliffs are massive dolomite from the Cambrian Karsha formation. They are overlain by dark Permian basaltic flows (Panjal Traps). The summit in the middle of the picture consists of Triassic sediments from the Lilang Group. This view from Purne is towards the northeast into the gorge of the Phugtal monastery. A chorten (or stupa) stands in the foreground.

Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union. Every geoscientist who is an amateur photographer (but also other people) can submit their images to this repository. Being open access, it can be used by scientists for their presentations or publications as well as by the press. If you submit your images to imaggeo, you retain full rights of use, since they are licenced and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.