GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays

Imaggeo on Mondays: The best of imaggeo in 2018

Imaggeo on Mondays: The best of imaggeo in 2018

Imaggeo, our open access image repository, is packed with beautiful images showcasing the best of the Earth, space and planetary sciences. Throughout the year we use the photographs submitted to the repository to illustrate our social media and blog posts. For the past few years we’ve celebrated the end of the year by rounding-up some of the best Imaggeo images. But it’s no easy task to pick which ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: Happy holidays!

Imaggeo on Mondays: Happy holidays!

The EGU wishes all our readers happy holidays and very warm wishes for the new year. And for a chance to be featured on GeoLog throughout the new year, don’t forget to submit your field and lab based photographs and other visuals to Imaggeo: our open access image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photos and videos to this gallery and, since it is open access, these images ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: Wandering the frozen Svalbard shore

Imaggeo on Mondays: Wandering the frozen Svalbard shore

These ethereal, twisted ice sculptures litter the frozen shoreline of Tempelfjorden, Svalbard, giving the landscape an otherworldly feel and creating a contrast with the towering ice cliff of the glacier and the mountains behind. They are natural flotsam, the scoured remnants of icebergs calved from the Tunabreen glacier, washed up on the shoreline. These icebergs were calved from the Tunabreen gl ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: The ash cloud of Eyjafjallajökull approaches

Imaggeo on Mondays: The ash cloud of Eyjafjallajökull approaches

This photo depicts the famous ash cloud of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull, which disrupted air traffic in Europe and over the North Atlantic Ocean for several days in spring 2010. The picture was taken during the initial phase of the eruption south of the town of Kirjubæjarklaustur, at the end of a long field work day. Visibility inside the ash cloud was within only a few metres. The erupt ...[Read More]