GeoLog

Open Access

Uploading your 2019 General Assembly presentation

Uploading your 2019 General Assembly presentation

This year it is, once again, possible to upload your oral presentations, PICO presentations and posters from EGU 2019 for online publication alongside your abstract, giving all participants a chance to revisit your contribution hurray for open science!

Files can be in either PowerPoint or PDF format. Note that presentations will be distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Uploading your presentation is free of charge and is not followed by a review process. The upload form for your presentation, together with further information on the licence it will be distributed under, is available here. You will need to log in using your Copernicus Office User ID (using the ID of the Corresponding Author) to upload your presentation.

Presentations and posters will be linked to their corresponding abstracts. If your presentation didn’t have an abstract (this is the case for short courses and others), but you still want to share it with the wider community you can consider uploading your presentation to slideshare or figshare as a PDF to share it instead.

Poster authors can also upload their poster PDF to the community preprint server ESSOAr, the Earth and Space Science Open Archive, at: https://www.essoar.org.

All legal and technical information, as well as the upload form, is available until 14 June 2019 at: http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/egu2019/abstractpresentation

Imaggeo Photo Competition finalists 2019 – who will you vote for?

Imaggeo Photo Competition finalists 2019 – who will you vote for?

This year’s Photo Competition judging panel received more than 600 photo submissions, covering fields across the geosciences. The fantastic finalist photos are below and they are being exhibited in Hall X2 (basement, Brown Level) of the Austria Center Vienna – see for yourself!

Do you have a favourite? Vote for it! There is a voting terminal (also in Hall X2), just next to the exhibit. Voting closes by Thursday 11 April and the winners will be announced online on Friday!

Time flows as the climate is changing. Credit: Kasia Tokarska (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A long-exposure look at Brúarfoss waterfall in Iceland.

 

Aurora show on the road. Credit: Junbin Zhao (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Busy drivers pass by without noticing the beautiful northern lights’ show overhead.

Pulp ……eruption! Credit: Valerio Acocella (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A close-up of a vent erupting blobs of blood-red basaltic magma during the Mt. Etna 2001 eruption, one of the most important of this volcano in the last century. This eruption marked a new cycle in the recent life of Etna and is also associated with flank instability threatening the lower inhabited eastern slope.

 

Temporary pond within ice fall of Fox Glacier. Credit: Stefan Winkler (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A temporary pond of meltwater on the surface of Fox Glacier, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Due to the fast movement and the rough surface, there is not an established supraglacial or englacial meltwater system resulting in temporary ponds forming and subsequently draining during over several weeks to a few months.

 

43°29’S 147°08’E – Meet me at the lighthouse. Credit: Vytas Huth (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Light pollution is an environmental hazard we often overlook. When I had the chance to view the Southern Hemisphere’s night sky with only the Antarctic Ocean in front of me, I realised how much we have already lost in the Northern Hemisphere and Europe. It almost seems as if the night is becoming extinct.

 

Something sticks out. Credit: Sophie von Fromm (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). While the windblown sand buries everything beneath, a lonely stick remains standing. Such sand storms occur quite frequently at the Gobabeb Training and Research Centre in the Namib Desert.

 

Coloured canyon curves. Credit: Nikita Churilin (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The morning sunlight is reflecting in the grains of sand in the Lower Antelope Canyon and paint the canyon in unusual colours.

 

Humans’ route in harmony with nature. Credit: Anatolii Chernov (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The Carpathian Mountains in Western Ukraine are a nice place to learn about structural geology and for relaxation. It is a pleasure to observe beautiful corners of the Earth, where people try to respect and cherish natural beauty.

 

Message from the deep. Credit: Katja Bigge (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Stromboli volcano, the original example of Strombolian activity defined by small regular eruptions.

 

A frozen time capsule. Credit: Florian Konrad (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The Schwarzmooskogel-Höhlensystem is located in the Totes Gebirge in Austria and consists of 17 individual caves with a total length of about 140km. Inside, it felt like time did not pass or just passed really slowly. The shapes that the ice had sculptured were endless and took our breath away.

The EGU General Assembly will take place from 07 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For the full session programme and more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

Short courses at EGU 2019

Short courses at EGU 2019

At this year’s General Assembly there are loads of short courses to choose from for broadening your expertise. You can supercharge your scientific skills, broaden your base in science communication and pick up tips on how to boost your career – be it in academia or outside. There is also a course aimed at making your time at the conference easier – be sure to take part, especially if it is your first time! And, if you do attend the short courses, don’t forget to share your experience with other conference participants on social media using the dedicated hashtag: #EGU19SC. Here’s a small selection of what’s in store at EGU 2019:

Supercharge your science – new techniques and dealing with data

Tips and tricks to boost your career

Being able to secure your own funding for research is key to a successful academic career and will give you important skills applicable to industry jobs too, so why not check out these three grant writing courses?

Additionally, you can also improve the chances of landing your dream job by attending these career development sessions.

Check out the career development short courses on offer to learn how you can boost your CV and develop your career! (N.H. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Kayla Rorick)

You can also gain very useful insight from those who have done it before, so why not take part in your Division’s ‘Meet the masters’ session? Here you’ll be able to meet experts in the field who can give you tips on how to get the most out of your career.

Science communication skills

With a growing emphasis on engaging the public with science and research, we have many workshops designed to develop your communication skills.

Make the most of the conference

Attending the conference for the first time can be daunting, as can be taking the step from presenting to convening a session. Here is a selection of short courses which can help you make the most of the conference, no matter what capacity you attend the conference in!

The EGU General Assembly will take place from 07 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For the full session programme and more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

Last chance to enter the EGU Photo Competition 2019!

Last chance to enter the EGU Photo Competition 2019!

If you are pre-registered for the 2019 General Assembly (Vienna, 7-12 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! Winners receive a free registration to next year’s General Assembly! But hurry, there are only a few days left to enter!

Every year we hold a photo competition and exhibit in association with our open access image repository, Imaggeo, and our annual General Assembly. There is also a moving image competition, which features a short clip of continuous geoscience footage. Pre-registered conference participants can take part by submitting up to three original photos and/or one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary and space sciences.

Shortlisted photos will be exhibited at the conference, together with the winning moving image, which will be selected by a panel of judges. General Assembly participants can vote for their favorite photos and the winning images will be announced on the last day of the meeting.

How to enter

You will need to register on Imaggeo to upload your image, which will also be included in the database. When you’ve uploaded it, you’ll have the option to edit the image details – here you can enter it into the EGU Photo Contest – just check the checkbox! The deadline for submissions is 15 February.

Previous winning photographs can be seen on the 201020112012,  201320142015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 winners’ pages.

EGU 2019 will take place from 07 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.