GeoLog

Geomorphology

Imaggeo on Mondays: Corno Grande, tallest peak of the Apennines

Imaggeo on Mondays: Corno Grande, tallest peak of the Apennines

In the middle of the Apennines lays the Gran Sasso d’Italia mountain chain, a picturesque collection of mountains situated in the heart of Italy.

Featured here is one of the chain’s peaks, called the Corno Grande, meaning ‘Big Horn,’ coloured with a faint reddish light of a late-winter sunset. Sitting at 2,912 metres, this summit is easily the highest mountain in the Apennines.

The areas surrounding Corno Grande is enclosed in the Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park, located in the hinterland of Italy’s Abruzzo region. The park, established in 1991, encompasses 2,015 square kilometres, making it one of the largest natural reserves in Europe.

Moreover, from an ecological standpoint, the region is one of the most biologically diverse areas in Europe, with more than 2,000 plant species, many of which can only be found in the park, and many rare animals.

The landscape that surrounds Corno Grande still shows traces of glacial erosion from the Quaternary Period, which began 2.6 million years ago. The region’s smooth highlands and U-shaped valleys are engravings of the slow glacial processes that occurred on these lands. The Corno Grande is even still host to a glacier today, as you can find the Calderone glacier, Western Europe’s southernmost glacier, beneath the mountain’s peak.

Sketch of the geodynamic setting of the Gran Sasso (Credit: Cardello and Doglioni, 2015)

The Apennine Mountains were built by a paradoxical geologic process, sometimes referred to as ‘syn-orogenic extension,’ where thickened crust spreads out while, at the same time, a belt of Earth’s crust is compressed, forming a chain of mountains. In the case of the Apennines, compression took place east of the range while extension occurred to the west.

“This synchronous processes of such different motions in the convergent belts is still an issue that must be unraveled for a better understanding of the mountain ridge formation,” said Alex Righetti, a PhD student studying marine geology at the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, in Portugal, who captured this shot.

By Olivia Trani, EGU Communications Officer and Alex Righetti, FCUL

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Probing the Pliocene

Imaggeo on Mondays: Probing the Pliocene

The heights we go to for science…

This photograph shows a member of our team preparing to abseil down a cliff in the Charyn Canyon, in the Ili River basin of southeast Kazakhstan. The Charyn River and its tributaries, a branch of the Ili River north of the Tien Shan Mountains, have cut canyons up to 300 metres deep, carving through rocks of different geologic ages, some as old as 540 million years.

The name “Charyn” may derive from local Uighur or Turkic words for “ash tree” or “precipice” respectively, both of which are common in the area.

Charyn Canyon is presently characterized by a cold semi-arid climate, with dry summers and cold winters. However, these conditions are likely to have varied through time, becoming wetter, drier, warmer and cooler in response to major climate systems’ changing intensity and influence over the region.

Our research team investigates the past and present climate systems of the Cenozoic era, our current geological era which began 66 million years ago; the most recent 2.6 million years have been characterised by alternating ice ages and warmer so-called “interglacial” phases, and saw the evolution of humans. More specifically, we study climate systems in one of the most remote regions of Central Asia, known as the Eurasian Continental Pole of Inaccessibility. The area is a challenging place for climate research since it has no marine or ice core records, the most common calendars of ancient climate.

This region is poorly understood yet important within the global climate system, since it lies at the boundaries of the major northern hemispheric climate systems. These systems, such as the Siberian high pressure system and Asian monsoons, are likely to have shifted, expanded and contracted over time. These changes occur in response to factors like mountain uplift, and changes in the Earth’s orbital patterns and incoming solar radiation.

The aim of our study is to reconstruct climatic change over this period. By analysing various chemical and physical characteristics of the sediments, such as their age, magnetism, grain size and chemistry, we can reconstruct quantitative palaeoclimatic variability through time.

Here we focus on an 80-metre thick layer of sediment, which alternates between layers of river-transported gravels and wind-blown dust deposits, known as loess. Younger sedimentary layers have thicker dust deposits, reflecting a long-term aridification trend in the Ili Basin and, more broadly, Central Asia.

Our preliminary results from our fieldwork indicate that the canyon’s sediments represent an uninterrupted representation of the region’s climate from the Pliocene to early Pleistocene (from approximately 4.5 to 1 million years ago).

Achieving a comprehensive geological sampling of the Charyn Canyon was only possible by abseil. Our fieldwork, undertaken from May to June 2017, was a hot and dusty business, but ultimately a lot of fun. Definitely not for those with a fear of heights!

By Kathryn Fitzsimmons, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Germany and Giancarlo Scardia, São Paulo State University, Brazil

Imaggeo on Mondays: Refuge in a cloudscape

Imaggeo on Mondays: Refuge in a cloudscape

The action of glaciers combined with the structure of the rock to form this little platform, probably once a small lake enclosed between a moraine at the mountain side and the ice in the valley.

Now it has become a green haven in the mountain landscape, a perfect place for an alp. In the Alps, stratus clouds opening up on autumn mornings often create gorgeous light display.

That day, some of the first light landed on this exact spot, while the mountain shadows still covered the valley bottom.

Description by Julien Seguinot, as it first appeared on imaggeo.egu.eu

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submittheir photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Cordillera de la Sal

Imaggeo on Mondays: Cordillera de la Sal

The photograph shows the Valle de la Luna, part of the amazing Cordillera de la Sal mountain range in northern Chile. Rising only 200 metres above the basin of the Salar de Atacama salt flat, the ridges of the Cordillera de la Sal represent a strongly folded sequence of clastic sediments and evapourites (salt can be seen in the left portion of the image), with interspersed volcanic material.

This formation evolved when the depression between the Cordillera Domeyko mountain range and the main Andean mountain ranges, filled by an ancient salt flat, was squeezed together over the last 10-15 million years, leaving behind the folded belt of hills seen today. Sand brought along from adjacent areas by the winds was caught between the ridges of the Cordillera de la Sal, accumulating to form the impressive dune shown in the foreground of the image.

Under normal conditions, the perfectly shaped Licancabur Volcano, forming the border between Chile and Argentina, would appear in the background of this sunset scene. However, the image was taken during the Invierno Boliviano (Bolivian winter), when humid air from the eastern side of the Andes travels west across the Andean Plateau, Altiplano. The air masses journey all the way to the otherwise extremely arid Atacama Desert, bringing clouds, rain and occasionally even hail.

I have been to this area three times: first for vacation, then two times for excursions with students, most recently in February this year. Interestingly, the weather was as to be expected for the Atacama Desert only one time. For the two other times, the weather was looking like this photograph, so it is hard for me to believe that the Atacama would be as arid as people always say. However, indeed, the pieces of geological and geomorphological evidence, such as the folded layers of the Cordillera de la Sal, clearly indicate its extreme aridity, prevailing for tens of millions of years!

By Martin Mergili, University of Vienna

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.