GeoLog

Geomorphology

Travels in Geology: A World Turned Upside Down

Travels in Geology: A World Turned Upside Down

Last weekend, with a strict, stay-at-home coronavirus order looming on the horizon, I decided to practice social distancing by escaping on one last hike. Since I’m currently in Colorado, I chose to climb North Table Mountain, the remnant of an ancient basalt lava flow located on the outskirts of Denver.   Locally this mesa, along with its twin located a short distance to the south, are popula ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: The sun rises also in the middle of nowhere

Imaggeo on Mondays: The sun rises also in the middle of nowhere

Uluru in Australia is one of the most visibly recognisable geological features in the world. This sandstone formation covers an area of 3.3 kilometres and stands 345 metres above the plains around it. According to geoscientists, the rocks that form Uluru were deposited in an inland sea during the Cambrian Period approximately 500 million years ago. The arkose sandstones were then uplifted and fold ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: Santorini cliffs sculpted by wind and sea

Imaggeo on Mondays: Santorini cliffs sculpted by wind and sea

The cliffs look like a bas-relief sculpted by a tireless artist. Naturally carved by the wind and sea, Vlychada’s white cliffs border its black sands, on the southern shore of Thera (Santorini), Greece. Both are of volcanic origin. The material originates from the Late Bronze Age eruption around 1600 BCE, which also buried the prosperous Akrotiri settlement. This massive Plinian eruption led to th ...[Read More]