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General Assembly

Mentoring programme at EGU 2018

Mentoring programme at EGU 2018

With over 14,000 participants, 4,849 oral presentations and over 11,000 posters, all under one roof, the General Assembly can be an overwhelming experience.  There is a warren of corridors to navigate, as well as a wide range of workshops, splinter and townhall meetings to choose from. With that in mind, we’ve put in place some initiatives to make the experience of those joining us in Vienna for the 1st time a rewarding one.

Especially designed with novice conference attendees, students, and early career scientists in mind, our mentoring programme aims to facilitate new connections that may lead to long-term professional relationships within the Earth, planetary and space science communities.

After a successful trial at last year’s meeting, we are now rolling the scheme out on a larger scale. Mentees are matched with a senior scientist (mentor) to help them navigate the conference, network with conference attendees, and exchange feedback and ideas on professional activities and career development.

The EGU will match mentors and mentees prior to the conference, and is also organising meeting opportunities (at the Sunday ice-breaker and on Monday morning) for those taking part in the mentoring programme.

In addition, mentoring pairs are encouraged to meet regularly throughout the week, and again at the end of the week, to make the most of the experience, as well as introduce each other to 3 to 5 fellow colleagues to facilitate the growth of each other’s network.

“Mentoring is an indispensable requirement for growth. Through the mentoring programme I was introduced to Dr Niels Hovius who was a generous mentor during EGU’17. His guidance during the conference enabled my interactions with prominent scientists and to navigate the conference to my maximum potential. I am grateful for this programme and hope it be fruitful for students in this coming year.”

Rheane da Silva (National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India), mentee

We anticipate the programme to be a rewarding experience for both mentees and mentors, so we encourage you to sing up by following the link to a short registration form. The details given in the questionnaire will enable us to match suitable pairs of mentors and mentees. The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2018.

You’ll find more details about the mentoring programme (including the requirements of the scheme) over on our website.

 

EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

 

What’s new for the 2018 General Assembly?

What’s new for the 2018 General Assembly?

Along with our conference organisers, Copernicus, we aim to improve the experience of General Assembly attendees year on year. Following feedback from participants in 2017, we’ll introduce some changes we hope will make the 2018 edition of our meeting even better! This post highlights a few of the changes that returning participants will notice at next year’s conference.

An ever-growing number of participants means making way for more presentations, posters and PICOs, so in 2017 we created an extended Yellow Level. Not only were you able to register there, it also accommodated extra space for posters and two PICO spots. As we expect 2018 to be another bumper year in terms of participation, the extra space at the front of the conference center is set to return.

We also wanted to make the experience of presenting a poster a more comfortable one; at the 2018 conference we will introduce all new poster boards. They’ll be made of a robust wooden frame, which will be filled with more padding, making them a lot more stable and able to absorb more noise from the busy poster halls. And with more presenters wanting to use their laptops or tablets to expand on their presentations, the new boards will also incorporate a larger table to facilitate discussion. Plus, they will be fitted with handy storage for poster tubes and backpacks.

The scheduling of the conference programme will also see some changes at the upcoming General Assembly. Oral blocks will be limited to 90 minutes, meaning there will be no 7th presentations anymore. In addition, while in the past solicited talks could be up to 30 minutes long, from 2018 onward they will be no longer than 15 minutes and limited to one per session. And finally, so that those presenting posters in the afternoon are not in competition with short courses, no workshops will take place during time block 5, but instead some will be scheduled from 19:00 onward.

And, in 2018 there is more reason than ever to become an EGU member. If you register to attend the conference before 1 March 2018 and you are an EGU member, your weekly ticket will cost €390. A similar early-bird discount is available to non-members, but weekly ticket costs are significantly higher: €530.  A similar pricing structure is in place for PhD students who are EGU members. Those registering after 1 March will no longer enjoy early registration discounts, regardless of their membership and career status.

Finally, we are taking steps to make the General Assembly greener. Not all the details are confirmed just yet, so stay tuned to the blog for details of our green initiatives for EGU 2018.

So, now that you’ve heard about what’s new for EGU 2018, don’t miss the deadline (10 January 2018) to submit your abstract! Especially if you intend to apply for Roland Schlich travel support, the closing date for applications is right around the corner: 1 December!

We look forward to seeing you in Vienna!

EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

Five top tips to apply for small grants

Five top tips to apply for small grants

Stephanie Zihms, the ECS Representative for the EMRP Division (and incoming Union Level Representative) has applied for a range of small scale grants (<£15,000, ca. 16,965€). At this year’s General Assembly, she was one of two speakers at the ‘How to write a research grant’ short course, where she shared  insights from her successes and failures. In today’s post she tells us about the top five lessons she learnt in the process of applying for funds.

Publications and grants are an important aspect in academia and success in both areas necessary for career progression. Frustratingly, many grants are only available to researchers with open-ended or permanent contracts and since practice makes perfect you don’t want your first grant proposal to be for a million pounds, dollars or euros.

Instead, there are plenty of (often unknown) small scale grants available to fund anything from a trip to a conference through to a field campaign and to support some of your existing work. Applying for these gives you valuable insight when it comes to writing larger-scale grants and shows future employers you have a go-getting attitude.

  1. Start early – start small: Travel grants, internal support grants, field work grants – these all count and will help you get better at writing in a proposal style, learn the language of different panels and get used to the format of a proposal. You might also get a chance to learn how to budget and justify certain costs, a big aspect of proposal writing.
  2. Always ask for feedback: Not only on the grants you didn’t get but also on the ones you secured. It will tell you what the panel really liked about your proposal and you can highlight that even more next time.

    Some feedback from my successful Royal Academy of Engineering Newton Fund application. Credit: Stephanie Zihms

  3. Get training: See if your university or institution offers grant writing or academic writing courses – even if you’re not working on a proposal when you attend this training will come in handy when you do. You are also likely to make some good connections with people that will be able to help you when you do start applying.
  4. Get help: Either from colleagues, connections you made during a writing course, a specialised office within your university or even from the institution offering the grant. See if you can get previous applications that were successful to help you make sure you get the language right.
  5. Write, write, write: As an academic you will spend a lot of your time writing so it’s good to get lots of practice and make writing regularly a habit. I try and write for 1 hour every morning before I head to the office and I attend a weekly writing group on campus. Or join a virtual writing group via Twitter for example #AcWri or #AcWriMo for November – since it is Academic Writing Month.

    Set up for our weekly Hide & Write group. Credit: Stephanie Zihms

Do you have any top tips for securing your first grants? If so, we’d love to hear them and share them with the GeoLog community. Please share your experiences and suggestions in the comments below!

Stephanie’s full presentation can be downloaded here.

At the upcoming General Assembly, Stephanie will be delivering a workshop on how to apply for small scale grants. Full details will be available once the conference programme launches, so stay tuned to the EGU 2018 website for more.

By Stephanie Zihms, the ECS Representative for the EMRP Division (and incoming Union Level Representative)

EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Of ancient winds and sands

Imaggeo on Mondays: Of ancient winds and sands

Snippets of our planet’s ancient past are frozen in rocks around the world. By studying the information locked in formations across the globe, geoscientist unpick the history of Earth. Though the layers in today’s featured image may seem abstract to the untrained eye, Elizaveta Kovaleva (a researcher at the University of the Free State in South Africa) describes how they reveal the secrets of ancient winds and past deserts.

In summer 2016 we toured the Western US in a minivan. We visited many of the gems of Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico, such as Monument Valley, Antelope Canyon, Grand Canyon, The Arches, Bryce Canyon, White Sands Monument… But the most precious and memorable for me was Zion National Park in Utah. This canyon is a unique and special place. First, because you access it from the bottom, unlike most of the other canyons, which you observe from cliff tops, such as the Grand Canyon. Thus, as you drive along the road, leading into Zion National Park, you look upward into the magnificent cliffs and rock temples. Small hiking trails lead up to waterfalls, arches and breathtaking views.

The cliffs of Zion National Park are built of Navajo Sandstone and display aeolian deposits, which have been shaped by winds, on a massive scale. They are the remnants of an ancient fossil-bearing sand desert, one of the greatest and largest wind-shaped environments that has ever existed on Earth.

In the Early Jurassic, up to 200 million years ago, the Navajo desert covered most of the Colorado Plateau (which today includes the states of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona). Fossils, found in these sand deposits, include ancient trees, dinosaur footprints and rare dinosaur bones.

In Zion National Park, the thickness of sand deposits reaches 762 m. Beautiful cross-beds are cross-sections through fossilized towering sand dunes. They indicate the direction of the ancient winds, which were mainly responsible for moving and accumulating the sand in the Navajo desert. On the top, the Navajo sandstone is abruptly truncated by a regional unconformity, which indicates the erosion of the overlying sediments, and is covered by Middle Jurassic sediments. In remains unknown how much of the Navajo sandstone was eroded from the top of the formation during this weathering episode. It might be that the thickness and height of the Navajo sand dunes used to be even more impressive than it is now.

The cliffs of Zion National Park. Pictured is Checkerboard Mesa (South-Eastern entrance to the Zion National Park. Credit: Credit: Elizaveta Kovaleva.

By Elizaveta Kovaleva, post-doctoral researcher at University of the Free State, in South Africa

Movement of ancient sand is one of the winners of the 2017 Imaggeo Photo Contest.

References

Ron Blakey and Wayne Ranney, Ancient Landscapes of the Colorado Plateau, Grand Canyon Association, 2008, p.156.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.