GeoLog

EGU GA 2016

GeoTalk: Beatriz Gaite on why videos are a great tool for communicating your research to a broad audience

GeoTalk: Beatriz Gaite on why videos are a great tool for communicating your research to a broad audience

If you’ve not heard about our Communicate Your Science Video Competition before it gives early career scientists the chance to produce a video up-to-three-minutes long to share their research with the general public. The winning entry receives a free registration to the General Assembly the following year.

In this GeoTalk interview, Laura Roberts talks to Beatriz Gaite an early career scientist whose video on how recycling the noisy part of recordings made by seismometers can tells us important information about the Earth’s interior structure was voted as the winning entry of the 2016 Communicate Your Science Video Competition. Read on to hear about their top tips for filming a science video and what inspired them to use video to communicate their science in the first place.

Before we get started, could you introduce yourself and tell our readers a little more about your research?

I am a seismologist mainly studying the Earth structure. I did my PhD on Mexico and its vicinity using a novel approach developed in the last decade. Before, seismologists used to study earthquake signals to infer the inner structure, but now we can also study seismic ambient noise, which is everything on a seismic record… except the earthquake signals! This means we now analyse what  used to be thrown away, once considered useless. In this sense, it is like recycling. This has revolutionised the field and opened multiple applications, not only for imaging the Earth interior, but also for monitoring landslides, volcanoes or climate change effects.

Some of our readers may yet not be familiar with the competition, can you tell us a little more about it and what made you decide to take part in the competition?

Yes, the EGU video competition consists on explaining your research to a general audience through a three minute video. Once ready, you submit your video to EGU and disseminate it as much as possible to get people to vote for it . I decided to take part  because I was fascinated with the bunch of applications developed from seismic ambient noise and aware of the importance of communicating science to society. This cocktail of thoughts inspired me to create the video.

Watch Beatriz’s winning film, Subtle Whisper of the Earth

Had you filmed any science videos prior to producing ‘Subtle Whisper of the Earth’?

No, never. Only as a teenager I recorded some short, home-made videos for outdoor activities, but nothing related with science. However, in the production of Shubtle Whisper of the Earth I was helped by two professionals: Jordi Cortés, the journalist in charge of the communication at the Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera, ICTJA-CSIC, who filmed and edited the video, and Daniel García (@rocambloguesco), an Earth Sciences communicator who helped me with the script.

What inspired you to make a film about your research and submit the entry to the competition?

Since I finished my PhD I was thinking about making a documentary to show how seismic ambient noise was such a big evolution for seismology. Indeed, I already had some script ideas bubbling in my mind. Then, I found out  about the competition through the recently created communication department of my center and, after thinking about it I went for it. I thought it [the video competition} was a great opportunity to make my ideas real.

We can’t go into too much detail here, but how did you go about collecting the footage and turning it into a film?

First, I adapted my original ideas to the length of the video competition specifications. After several iterations, I got the main idea. In parallel, I thought on the story: I needed something common to people, like recycling. I made a script, then Daniel helped me to simplify it from the research realm to society, and I organised it in sequences, duration and film resources. All these steps were the most time-consuming part. Jordi and I organized the “field work” dividing the filming on indoor and outdoor. Since we organized the sequence planning in advance, it took us only one morning shooting indoors and one afternoon outdoors. Jordi’s experience behind the camera and in  production helped a lot to get the final video, but we only used user-level material and software for producing and editing.

What’s your top tip for aspiring science filmmakers?

Have a clear idea of the message you want to communicate. Also, you need a story to catch the attention of the audience. Once you have the idea and the story, the next step, how to visually express them, comes easily.

Beatriz preparing materials to be used in the making of her film. Credit: Jordi Cortés

Which part of the filming process did you enjoy the most?

I enjoyed the whole process, but especially two parts: first, the beginning of the creative process, thinking what, why, and how I wanted to communicate the story, imagining the screenshots in my mind. And second, shooting with Jordi was really fun, I enjoyed it a lot, it was like a game.

Would you recommend filmmaking as a way for scientist to reach out to a broad audience?

Sure! When I started I did not think that the video would reach as many people as it did. I was really happy when some friends told me ‘now we know what you do’. Even some colleagues told me that now they understood pretty well what we get from the seismic ambient noise. It is worth it. A short video is a good way to reach a broad audience globally. Being short, specific and visual are good ingredients to grab attention.

Would you recommend others taking part in the Communicate your Science Video Competition?

Yes, of course. It is an enjoyable exercise to communicate your research. The hardest part of the competition is the self-promotion to get votes, but that’s a different story 😉

Has this interview inspired you to go forth and produce a science video? The Communicate Your Science Video Competition is currently open for submissions.

If you are pre-registered to attend the General Assembly in April, go ahead and produce a video with scenes of you out in the field, or at the lab bench showing how to work out water chemistry; entries can also include cartoons, animations (including stop motion), or music videos, – you name it! To submit your video simply email it to Laura Roberts (networking@egu.eu) by 26 February 2017.

For more information about the competition take a look at this blog post. For inspiration, why not take a look at the finalist videos from the 2015 and 2016 editions? For more tips and tricks on how to make a video to communicate your research read an interview with vlogger extraordinaire Simon Clark. We also spoke to Zakaria Ghazoui, winner of the 2015 video competition to as his thoughts on how to make a great video.

The best of Imaggeo in 2016: in pictures

The best of Imaggeo in 2016: in pictures

Imaggeo, our open access image repository, is packed with beautiful images showcasing the best of the Earth, space and planetary sciences. Throughout the year we use the photographs submitted to the repository to illustrate our social media and blog posts.

For the past few years we’ve celebrated the end of the year by rounding-up some of the best Imaggeo images. But it’s no easy task to pick which of the featured images are the best! Instead, we turned the job over to you!  We compiled a Facebook album which included all the images we’ve used  as header images across our social media channels and on Imaggeo on Mondays blog post in 2016 an asked you to vote for your favourites.

Today’s blog post rounds-up the best 12 images of Imaggeo in 2016, as chosen by you, our readers.

Of course, these are only a few of the very special images we highlighted in 2016, but take a look at our image repository, Imaggeo, for many other spectacular geo-themed pictures, including the winning images of the 2016 Photo Contest. The competition will be running again this year, so if you’ve got a flare for photography or have managed to capture a unique field work moment, consider uploading your images to Imaggeo and entering the 2017 Photo Contest.

Blue Svartisen . Credit: Kay Helfricht (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

When you think of a glacier the image you likely conjure up in your mind is that of bright white, icy body. So why do some glaciers, like Engabreen, a glacier in Norway, sometimes appear blue? Is it a trick of the light or some other phenomenon which causes this glacier to look so unusual?  You can learn all about it in this October post over on GeoLog.

 

‘There is never enough time to count all the stars that you want.’ . Credit: Vytas Huth (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The centre of the Milky Way taken near Krakow am See, Germany. Some of the least light-polluted atmosphere of the northern german lowlands.

Among the winning images of our annual photo contest was a stunning night-sky panorama by Vytas Huth; we aren’t surprised it has been chosen as one of the most popular images of 2016 too. In this post, Vytas describes how he captured the image and how the remote location in Southern Germany is one of the few (in Europe) where it is still possible to, clearly, image the Milk Way.

 

“Above the foggy strip, this white arch was shining, covering one third of the visible sky in the direction of the ship's bow,” he explains. “It was a so-called white, or fog rainbow, which appears on the fog droplets, which are much smaller then rain droplets and cause different optic effects, which is a reason of its white colour.”

Gateway to the Arctic . Credit: Mikhail Varentsov (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

“Above the foggy strip, this white arch was shining, covering one third of the visible sky in the direction of the ship’s bow,” describes Mikhail Varentsov, a climate and meteorology expert from the University of Moscow. “It was a so-called white, or fog rainbow, which appears on the fog droplets, which are much smaller then rain droplets and cause different optic effects, which is a reason of its white colour.” Mikhail captured the white rainbow while aboard the Akademik Tryoshnikov research vessel during its scientific cruise to study the effects of climate change on the Arctic.

 

History. Credit: Florian Fuchs (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The header image, History by Florian Fuchs, we used across our social media channels was popular with our Facebook followers, who chose it as one of the best of this year. The picture features La Tarta del Teide – a stratigraphic section through volcanic deposits of the Teide volcano on Tenerife, Canary Islands.

 

Find a new way . Credit: Wolfgang Fraedrich (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Lavas erupted into river waters, and as a result cooled very quickly, can give rise to fractures in volcanic rocks. They form prismatic structures which can be arranged in all kinds of patterns: horizontally (locally known as the woodpile), slightly arching (the harp) and in a radial configuration known as the rosette. The most common configuration is the ‘organ pile’ where vertical fractures form. These impressive structures are seen in the walls of the Gole dell ‘Alcantara, a system of gorges formed 8,000 years ago in the course of the river Alcantara in eastern Sicily.

 

Home Sweet Home . Credit: André Nuber (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Can you imagine camping atop some of the highest mountains in Europe and waking up to a view of snowcapped peaks, deep valleys and endless blue skies? This paints an idyllic picture; field work definitely takes Earth scientists to some of the most beautiful corners of the planet.

 

Isolated Storm . Credit: Peter Huber (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

In November 2016 we featured this photograph of an isolated thunderstorm in the Weinviertel in April. The view is towards the Lower Carpathian Mountains and Bratislava about 50 kilometers from Vienna. Why do storms and isolated thunderstorms form? Find out in this post.

 

Glacial erratic rocks . Credit: Yuval Sadeh (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

As glaciers move, they accumulate debris underneath their surface. As the vast frozen rivers advance, they carry the debris, which can range from pebble-sized rocks through to house-sized boulders, along with it. As the climate in the Yosemite region began to warm as the ice age came to an end, the glaciers slowly melted. Once all the ice was gone, the rocks and boulders, known as glacial erratics, were left behind.

 

Snow and ash in Iceland . Credit: Daniel Garcia Castellanos (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Icelandic snow-capped peaks are also sprinkled by a light dusting of volcanic ash in this photograph. Dive into this March 2016 post to find out the source of the ash and more detail about the striking peak.

 

Living Flows . Credit: Marc Girons Lopez (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

There are handful true wildernesses left on the planet. Only a few, far flung corners, of the globe remain truly remote and unspoilt. To explore and experience untouched landscapes you might find yourself making the journey to the dunes in Sossuvlei in Namibia, or to the salty plain of the Salar Uyuni in Bolivia. But it’s not necessary to travel so far to discover an area where humans have, so far, left little mark. One of the last wilds is right here in Europe, in the northern territories of Sweden. This spectacular photograph of the Laitaure Delta is brought to you by Marc Girons Lopez, one of the winners of the 2016 edition of the EGU’s Photo Contest!

 


The power of ice. Credit: Romain Schläppy, (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu).

The January 2016 header image across our social media was The Power of Ice, by Romain Schlappy. This vivid picture was captured from a helicopter by Romain Schläppy during a field trip in September 2011. You can learn more about this image by reading a previous imaggeo on mondays post.

 

Sea of Clouds over Uummannaq Fjord. Credit: Tun Jan Young (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The current header image, Sea of Clouds over Uummannaq Fjord by Tun Jan Young, is also a hit with our followers and the final most popular image from Imaggeo in 2016. A sudden change of pressure system caused clouds to form on the surface of the Uummannaq Fjord, Northwestern Greenland, shrouding the environment in mystery.

 

If you pre-register for the 2017 General Assembly (Vienna, 22 – 28 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

 

GeoTalk: Using satellites to unravel the secrets of our planet’s polar regions

GeoTalk: Using satellites to unravel the secrets of our planet’s polar regions

Geotalk is a regular feature highlighting early career researchers and their work. In this interview we speak to Bert Wouters, a polar scientist at the University of Utrecht, and winner of one of the 2016 Arne Richter Awards for Outstanding Young Scientists. At a time when the polar regions are facing increasing challenges resulting from climate change, understanding how they might respond to them is crucial. Bert’s PhD research using satellite data (from the GRACE mission) set a benchmark for the analysis and interpretation of data like it. As his career has advanced, Bert has made contributions to a number of fields within the polar sciences, from ice-sheet research, glacier and ice-cap mass-balance studies, through to ocean modeling and climate prediction. It is this notable breadth of knowledge, accompanied by an impressive publication record which makes Bert a worthy awardee.

First, could you introduce yourself and tell us a little more about your career path so far?

I was born and raised in Belgium, but moved to the Netherlands to study aerospace enginieering at the TU Delft when I was eightteen. During my PhD there, I focused on the use of satellite gravity data for climate science. Back then, the GRACE satellites had been in orbit for only a couple of years, and people were still learning how to handle and interpret this completely new set of data. The observations contained a lot more noise than expected before launch and one of the first things I did was to develop a method to remove this noise. Once we managed to do so, it opened up a whole new world. For the first time, we could track the movement of water mass on the Earth surface from month to month. These were certainly exciting times! My supervisor gave me the freedom to do pursue my own interests and I used the GRACE data to study many different topics, ranging from hydrology to oceanography and solid earth science. In the last year of my PhD, I focused on the cryosphere, which is still my main field of research.

After graduating, I did have the opportunity to continue in geodesy, but I felt it might be better for my overall development to step out of my comfort zone and move to a different field. I started a post-doc at the Dutch meteorological office (KNMI), with the aim of improving predictions of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. This is part of the global ocean conveyor belt and transports heat around the Earth. It has an important impact on the climate in the Atlantic region (think The day after tomorrow, minus the Hollywood drama) and my job was to predict its behaviour on decadal time scales using a global climate model. The first year was pretty though, but I learned a lot about the complexity of climate physics and numerical modeling, and I still profit from this experience today.

Meet Bert!

In 2012, I was awarded an ERC Marie Curie-Skłodowska fellowship and moved the University of Colorado in Boulder for 2 years to work with John Wahr. He was one of the founding fathers of the GRACE mission and a true giant in the field of geodesy. I had not met him before I started my fellowship, but he turned out to be not only a great scientist, but also one of the kindest and friendly persons I have ever met. I continued to refine my GRACE methods for monitoring of the cryosphere, but also started looking at different types of remote sensing data, in particular height measurements made by the Cryosat-2 altimetry mission.

This satellite had only been launched 2 years before and data was being released bit by bit.It gave me a great drive to be among a select group of people having a first look at these new observations. In the last year of my fellowship, I worked at the University of Bristol with Jonathan Bamber (the  EGU’s current  vice-president) to further refine the Cryosat-2 processing and combine it with the GRACE data. The combination of two independent measurements provides a powerful tool to map the ongoing changes in the cryosphere and yielded in some very exciting results.

Since November 2015, I’m a post-doc at the Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (IMAU, Utrecht University), renowned for their modelling of the regional processes (snowfall, melt, etcetera) on ice sheets and glaciers. Such models, together with in-situ observations, are indispensible to understand the changes we are seeing in the satellite data.

During EGU 2016, you gave a talk which focused on melting of glaciers and ice-caps in the North Atlantic. During the talk you spoke about the implication such melting might have on global sea level rise. Could you tell us a little more about your findings?

It’s a well known fact that the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are losing ice. Studies about these regions usually receive a lot of attention from the media and general public, and rightly so: they contain a huge reservoir of ice and will be one of the major contributors to sea level rise in the coming centuries.

But we shouldn’t forget about the smaller ice caps and glaciers in other parts of the world. Many of them are located in regions which are experiencing rapid warming and because of their small size and the delicate balance between snowfall and melt that shapes them, they are extremely vulnerable to changes in the local climate. The GRACE and Cryosat-2 data show that glaciers in the North-Atlantic region currently contribute as much to sea-level rise as the Antarctic ice sheet and will continue to do so in the future. In fact, models indicate that some of the ice caps are already beyond a point of no return and that glaciers and ice caps will be one of the major sources of sea level rise in the coming decades.

Why have the glaciers and ice-caps of the North  Atlantic region received such little attention, at least until now, considering the potentially large impact their melting can have on global sea levels?

Tthe Devon Ice Cap, located in eastern Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada is one of the North Atlantic region ice-caps which have received little attention.

Well, of course I’m not the first to study these glaciers and ice caps. In fact, some individual glaciers have been monitored for over a hundred years. These records are extremely valuable and vital for validating and interpreting satellite observations, and already showed that many glaciers are retreating.

However, taking in-situ measurements on a glacier is a challenging job, and often expensive, so these observations are generally made on small glaciers, which tend to be located in easily accessible locations with a maritime climate.  This means that the few hundreds of glaciers that are monitored on a regular basis are not necessarily representative for the roughly 200 000 glaciers world wide. We really need satellite observations for that. So maybe one of the reasons that they have received little attention is because we just didn’t know how bad things are until recently.

Another reason is that their big brothers, Antarctica and Greenland, pose a huge threat, too, especially when considering longer, millenial, time scales. There’s only so much research funding out there, so in a way it makes sense that the scientific community focused on this first when global warming came into the picture.

A common theme throughout your research has been using satellite data and geodesy to unravel the secrets of our planet’s polar regions and oceans. What attracted you to this particular branch of the Earth sciences?

To be honest, I ended up in this field more or less haphazardly, it wasn’t part of a grand master plan I had when I started university. Back then, my main interest lay in aerodynamics, but by the time I had to choose a topic for my master thesis, I couldn’t imagine myself working on that for the rest of my life. When one of my supervisors suggested I work on remote sensing of sea level rise, it felt as if it was the right thing to do and that’s how it all started.
Having said that, as a kid, I was fascinated by two things: science, inspired by a nutty professor in my favorite comic books, and nature (around the age of six, I started a club together with a friend to save the planet) and in a way I’m combining these two things in my present job. So maybe I was just destined for this after all…

Also, at a time where travel has almost become a commodity to most people, I find it fascinating that there are still places on Earth where no one has ever set foot and which we can only study using remote sensing. Its very intriguing and almost a privilige to be able to map these places at an ever increasing level of detail, especially with all the dramatic changes that are now going on in the polar regions.

Quoting the late Gordon Hamilton: “Every time I open up a satellite image the potential is there for something astonishing to have happened since the last time I looked.” That sums up pretty well what makes this job so exciting, I think.

The Grace satellites in action. Credit: NASA JPL.

It’s clear that satellite data is invaluable when it comes to understanding changes on our planet. How do the GRACE and Cyosat satellites help in that effort?

GRACE is the only mission that can directly weigh the ice caps and glaciers, but it has a very coarse resolution, typically a few hundreds of kilometres. It helps to track the changes in ice mass on a regional scale, but that’s far too low to identify individual ice caps or glaciers. Cryosat-2 allows us to do so, but it measures height changes, and certain assumptions need to be made to translate this to mass changes, which can be verified against the GRACE observations. So these two missions nicely compliment each other.

Thank you for talking to us Bert. We’ll round-off this interview with a final question about careers. As a researcher who has made huge advances in this field, what advice would you give to someone who wants to pursue research in the field of geodesy and remote sensing, particularly when it comes to focusing on the planet’s polar regions?

Keep an open mind and don’t be afraid to stray outside your  own research field! Everything is connected in climate science, the polar regions aren’t an isolated system and to understand what’s going on and how to optimally use the satellite data, a basic knowledge of climate physics helps a lot.

Many problems we’re facing in geodesy and remote sensing also pop up in other fields, in a slightly different way and often other people have already found a solution to your problem. For example, to filter out the noise in the GRACE data, I used a method that’s commonly applied in atmospheric science. My second advice would be: collaborate! The problems we’re facing are so complex that it’s impossible to solve everything on your own. Interact with other scientists, within and outside your own field, it pays off.

And don’t be afraid to share your data and preliminary results with others. There’s a lot of pressure, especially on starting scientists, to publish as much as possible which sometimes makes it tempting to keep your data to yourself. But many times, other people have that piece of data that would make your study so much more interesting. And if someone else publishes a paper on something you’re working on, don’t hold any grudges, but try to find a different angle to it and do better. There’s some much to study, and science shouldn’t be about competition, but about collaboration.

Geotalk is a regular feature highlighting early career researchers and their work.

Imaggeo on Mondays: The shrinking of Earth’s saltiest lake

One of the consequences of the rapid fall of the water level (>1 m per year), is that vast areas of salt-rich ground of the shrunken Dead Sea are prone to strong dissolution and mechanical erosion of the subsurface processes.

The Dead Sea is one of the saltiest lakes on Earth, located at the lowest point of the globe.  For centuries it has been known for the restorative powers of its muds and waters. Their hypersalinity means it is possible to easily float on the lake’s surface.

Bordering Israel, the West Bank and Jordan, it is a unique environment in an otherwise arid region.  Changing climate, which is seeing temperatures rise in the Middle East, and the increased demand for water in the region (for irrigation) mean the areas on the banks of the lake are suffering a major water shortage. As a result, the lake is shrinking at an alarming rate.

The changing geomorphology of the Dead Sea region is now the focus of a large international project (DESERVE) to address the resulting geohazards at the Dead Sea.

One of the consequences of the rapid fall of the water level (>1 m per year), is that vast areas of salt-rich ground of the shrunken Dead Sea are prone to strong dissolution and mechanical erosion of the subsurface processes. This leads to the widespread land subsidence and the development of sinkholes, which pose a major geological hazard to infrastructure, local population, agriculture and industry in the Dead Sea area, writes Djamil Al-Halbouni in an abstract presented at the EGU 2016 General Assembly.

Today’s Imaggeo on Monday’s image was taken in the purpose of investigating the sinkhole phenomenon along the coastline.

“Near-surface aerial photography offer valuable hints on possible processes that lead to the formation of huge depression zones, e.g. the ground and surface water flow, the existence of vegetation and water sources or simply the morphology,” explains Djamil.

Sets of images are then combined into digital terrain models to quantitatively estimate hazard potentials and development of sinkholes via repeated measurements.

Specifically, this image was taken by a camera on a helikite balloon from 150m altitude. It shows a canyon penetrating the whitish pure salt shoreline at the Jordanian coast. It also reveals, in its’ magnitude surprising for the scientists involved, round structures under the shallow water, which are interpreted as submarine springs and possible submarine sinkholes close to the shore.

 By Laura Roberts and Djamil Al-Halbouni of the German Research Center for Geosciences, Physics of the Earth, Potsdam, German

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.