GeoLog

Cryospheric Sciences

Imaggeo on Mondays: Refuge in a cloudscape

Imaggeo on Mondays: Refuge in a cloudscape

The action of glaciers combined with the structure of the rock to form this little platform, probably once a small lake enclosed between a moraine at the mountain side and the ice in the valley.

Now it has become a green haven in the mountain landscape, a perfect place for an alp. In the Alps, stratus clouds opening up on autumn mornings often create gorgeous light display.

That day, some of the first light landed on this exact spot, while the mountain shadows still covered the valley bottom.

Description by Julien Seguinot, as it first appeared on imaggeo.egu.eu

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submittheir photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Iceberg viewing in Cape Spear, Newfoundland, Canada

Imaggeo on Mondays: Iceberg viewing in Cape Spear, Newfoundland, Canada

Cape Spear in Newfoundland, Canada is the easternmost location in North America and one of the few places in the world where you can contemplate icebergs from the shore. Every year, about 400 to 800 bergs journey down to this particular point. These 10,000-year-old ice giants drift along the northern shore of Newfoundland with the Labrador Current.

About 90 percent of these icebergs come from western Greenland glaciers, where they break off directly into Baffin Bay. Often these bergs remain in the bay for several years, preserved by the cold arctic waters and circulating along with local currents. Eventually, many icebergs escape through the Davis Strait, drifting down the Labrador Current and passing through Iceberg Alley to reach the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, the region of the North American continental shelf where Cape Spear is situated. This journey from Greenland to the Grand Banks usually takes between two and three years.

Cape Spear is just a few kilometres from Newfoundland’s largest city, St. John’s, and attracts many tourists during spring and early summer months to enjoy the immense icebergs. The chances of seeing them depend greatly on the temperature, wind direction, ocean currents and amount of sea ice during the winter, which protects icebergs from erosion. The icebergs have a great impact on Newfoundland’s identity and economy, bringing tourists and even giving breweries unique ice for beer and liquor production.

On the other hand, the floating ice can be a hazard to oil platforms and cargo boats. Smaller bergs can be especially hazardous since they are harder to detect with marine radar. If deep enough, the icebergs can also damage seabed structures like pipelines and cables. Thus, it is important to keep monitoring the dynamics of icebergs, especially since there will likely be a greater volume of ice breaking from the Greenland glaciers and drifting in the North Atlantic due to climate change.

By Simon Massé, PhD student, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Canada

References

Barber, D.G., Babb, D.G., Ehn, J.K., Chan,W., Matthes, L., Dalman, L. A., et al.: Increasing mobility of high Arctic Sea ice increases marine hazards off the east coast of Newfoundland, Geophysical Research Letters, 45,2370–2379, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017GL076587, 2018.

Diemand, D., Icebergs, Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences, 3: 1255-1264,  2001.

Iceberg Finder, Icebergs Facts. Newfoundland & Labrador Tourism, 2012.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

 

Geosciences Column: The science behind snow farming

Geosciences Column: The science behind snow farming

For roughly the last decade, some ski resorts and other winter sport facilities have been using a pretty unusual method to ensure white slopes in winter. It’s called snow farming. The practice involves collecting natural or artificially made snow towards the end of winter, then storing the frozen mass in bulk over the summer under a thick layer of sawdust, woodchips, mulch, or other insulating material.

Many winter sport destinations have adopted the practice. In preparation for the 2014 Winter Olympics, Sochi, Russia stockpiled about 800,000 cubic metres of human-made snow during the warmer season, enough snow to fill 320 Olympic-size swimming pools.

Despite the growing trend, there still is little research on snow farming techniques. Recently, a team of scientists from the Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research (SLF) and the CRYOS Laboratory at the École Polytechnique Fédérale in Switzerland examined the success of snow conservation practices and used models to estimate what factors influence covered snow. Their findings were published in the EGU’s open access journal The Cryosphere.

Why store snow for the winter?

The ski industry has been storing snow for many reasons. The practice is a way for winter sports facilities to accommodate training athletes, start ski seasons earlier, and guarantee snow for major sports events. Snow farming can also be seen as a way to adapt to Earth’s changing climate, according to the authors of the study. Indeed, research published last year in The Cryosphere, found that the Alps may lose as much as 70 percent of snow cover by the end of the century if global warming continues unchecked. Snow loss to this degree could severely threaten the $70 billion dollar (57 billion EUR) industry and the alpine communities that depend on ski tourism.

For some ski resorts, the effects of climate change are already visible. For example, in Davos, Switzerland, a popular venue of the International Ski Federation Cross-Country World Cup, winter temperatures have risen over the last century while snow depth in turn has steadily declined.

Snow heap study

The research team studied two snow heaps: one near Davos, Switzerland (pictured here) and another in South Tyrol. Credit: Grünewald et al.

To better understand snow conservation techniques, the research team studied two artificially made snow heaps: one sitting near Davos and another located in South Tyrol. Each pile contained approximately 7,000 cubic metres of snow, about enough ice and powder to build 13,000 1.8-metre tall snowmen. The piles were also each covered with a 40 cm thick layer of sawdust and chipped wood.

Throughout the 2015 spring and summer season, the researchers measured changes in snow volume and density, as well as recorded the two sites’ meteorological data, including air temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. The research team also fed this data to SNOWPACK, a model that simulates snow pile evolution and helps determine what environmental processes likely impacted the snow.

Cool under heat

From their observations, the researchers found that the sawdust and chipped wood layering conserved more than 75 percent of the Davos snow volume and about two thirds of the snow in South Tyrol. Given the high proportion of remaining snow, the researchers conclude that snow farming appears to be an effective tool for preparing for winter.

According to the SNOWPACK model, while sunlight was the biggest source of snow melt, most of this solar radiation was absorbed by the layer of sawdust and wood chips. The simulations suggest that the snow’s covering layer took in the sun’s heat during the day, then released this energy at night, creating a cooling effect on the snow underneath. Even more, the model found that, when the thick layer was moist, the evaporating water cooled the snow as well. The researchers estimate that only nine percent of the sun’s energy melted the snow heaps. Without the insulating layer, the snow would have melted far more rapidly, receiving 12 times as much energy from the sun if uncovered, according to the study.

Images of the South Tyrol snow heap from (a) 19 May and (b) 28 October. The snow depth (HS) is featured in c & d and snow height change (dHS) is shown in e. Credit: Grünewald et al.

The researchers found that the thickness of the covering layer was an important factor for snow conservation. When the team modelled potential snow melt under a 20 cm thick cover, the insulating and cooling effects from the layer had greatly diminished.

The simulations also revealed that, while higher air temperatures and wind speed increased snow melt, this effect was not very significant, suggesting that subalpine areas could also benefit from snow farming practices.

In the face of changing climates and disappearing snow, snow farming may be one solution for keeping winters white and skiers happy.

References

Grünewald, T., Wolfsperger, F., and Lehning, M.: Snow farming: conserving snow over the summer season, The Cryosphere, 12, 385-400, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-385-2018, 2018.

Marty, C., Schlögl, S., Bavay, M., and Lehning, M.: How much can we save? Impact of different emission scenarios on future snow cover in the Alps, The Cryosphere, 11, 517-529, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-517-2017, 2017.

 

 

Geosciences Column: How fast are Greenland’s glaciers melting into the sea?

Geosciences Column: How fast are Greenland’s glaciers melting into the sea?

The Greenland ice sheet is undergoing rapid change, and nowhere more so than at its margins, where large outlet glaciers reach sea level. Because these glaciers are fed by very large reservoirs of ice, they don’t just flow to the coast, but can extend many kilometres out into the ocean. Here, the ice – being lighter than water – will float, but remain connected to the ice on the mainland. This phenomenon is called an ice shelf or, if it is confined to a relatively narrow fjord, an ice tongue. Ice shelves currently exist in Antarctica as well as in high Arctic Canada and Greenland.

Ice shelves already float on the ocean so that their melting does not affect sea level, but they are a crucial part of a glacier’s architecture. The mass of an ice shelf, as well as any contact points with fjord walls, mean that it acts as a buttress for the rest of the glacier, slowing down its flow speed and stabilising it. When ice shelves melt, therefore, this can lead to the whole glacier system behind them flowing faster and thus delivering more land-based ice to the ocean.

Ice shelves lose mass as icebergs calve off at their seaward end, and through melting on their surface – but, unlike glaciers on land, they are with the ocean below. This ice-ocean interface is an important source of melting for a number of glaciers in northern Greenland; instead of the large volume of icebergs produced by many glaciers further south, the large ice tongues reaching into the ocean mean that a lot of ice is instead lost through submarine melting.

This ice-ocean interface is an environment that was, until recently, very difficult to accurately observe and study, and accordingly there is relatively little data on the impact of submarine melting on ice shelves. But the changes that take place here, at the ice-ocean interface, can have important implications for the entire glacier system, as well as for the ice sheet as a whole.

Over the last 30 years, a number of Arctic ice shelves and ice tongues have dramatically shrunk or disappeared entirely. In the Canadian Arctic, the Ellesmere ice shelf broke up into a number of smaller shelves over the course of the 20th century, most of which are continuing to shrink. In Greenland, meanwhile, the dramatic retreat of the Jakobshavn Glacier’s ice tongue during the 2000s has been particularly well documented.

The largest remaining ice tongues in Greenland are now all located in the far north of the island. But even here, at nearly 80°N and beyond, ice tongues are changing rapidly. Warming air temperatures probably play a role in this development, but submarine melting is thought to be the key driver of these rapid changes.

Submarine melting of ice tongues thus appears to be an important variable in ice-sheet dynamics. A new study in the EGU’s open access journal The Cryosphere has now used satellite imagery to produce a detailed map of submarine melt under the three largest ice tongues in northern Greenland. They are the ones belonging to Petermann and Ryder Glaciers in far northwestern Greenland and 79N Glacier – named after the latitude of its location – in the northeast of the island. Each of these ice shelves extends dozens of kilometres from where the glacier stops resting on bedrock and begins to float (the so-called grounding line) and is up to several hundred metres thick.

The locations of Petermann (PG), Ryder (RG) and 79N Glaciers in northern Greenland. From Wilson et al. (2017).

Previous attempts to estimate submarine melt rates relied on an assumption of steady state: that the ice shelf is becoming neither thicker nor thinner. Given the recent changes in all these ice shelves and the glaciers above them, this is not a tenable assumption in this case. Petermann and Ryder Glaciers, in particular, have recently experienced large calving events that were probably related to unusual melt patterns under the waterline.

Lead author Nat Wilson, a PhD student at MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and his colleagues used satellite images spanning four years to create a number of digital elevation models of the Petermann, Ryder and 79N ice shelves. A digital elevation model, or DEM, is a three-dimensional representation of a surface created – in this case – from satellite-based elevation data. By comparing DEMs from different points in time to each other, the team could deduct changes in the height – and therefore volume – of the ice shelves. This method also allowed them to track visible features of the glaciers between images from different years, providing estimates of how fast the ice was flowing down into the ocean.

However, using digital elevation models in a marine setting is not always a straightforward matter. Tides can affect the elevation of ice shelves by a significant amount, especially as the distance from the grounding line increases, and their effect needed to be accounted for in the results. Similarly, the team had to account for the changes on the surface of the ice shelf, where snowfall and melting can affect its volume.

What Wilson and his colleagues were left with was a map of melt rates across the ice shelves. In some respects, the findings were unsurprising. Melt rates were greatest near the coast, where the ice shelves were thickest, because at these points they would be in contact with the ocean at depths of several hundred metres. At such depths, fjords around Greenland often contain warm, dense water that flows in from the continental shelf and contributes to rapid ice melt. As the ice shelves thin towards their outer edges, they are in contact with shallower, colder water that doesn’t melt the ice as quickly.

Submarine melt rates at Greenland’s largest ice tongues are shown in colour shading; the arrows show the direction of ice flow. PG – Petermann Glacier; RG -Ryder Glacier. From Wilson et al. (2017).

All three ice shelves lost between 40-60m per year to submarine melting at their thickest points, while this decreased to about 10m per year in thinner sections. This equates to billions of tonnes of ice melting in contact with the ocean. Each of the ice shelves lost at least five times as much ice to melting underwater than to melting on the surface. This highlights what an important contribution submarine melting makes to the mass balance of Greenland’s ice shelves, and that this remote environment is deserving of our interest and study.

The team found that at Ryder Glacier’s ice shelf, mass loss from melting (from both above and below) is not significantly greater than the amount of ice entering the ice shelf from land: the ice shelf appears to be relatively stable for the time being. The situation is similar at Petermann Glacier, although its ice shelf has been in rapid retreat and lost some 250 km in the decade leading up to 2010. With the extra submarine melting from that area, melting would likely have exceeded incoming ice! It remains to be seen whether Petermann Glacier and its ice shelf will stabilise in their new configuration.

Finally, at 79N Glacier, the results indicate the ice shelf is losing mass faster than it is replenished from upstream. The ice tongue loses some 1.3% of its mass to melting each year – and that’s before iceberg calving is included in the equation. This finding is consistent with satellite imagery that suggests that the ice shelf at 79N has been thinning in recent decades.

This new study shows that there is considerable variability in submarine melting of ice shelves, both in space and in time. 79N glacier’s ice shelf – the biggest one remaining in Greenland – exhibited the highest mass deficit in this study, suggesting that we may see major changes in this glacier in future. With this type of melt making up for the bulk of mass loss of northern Greenland’s ice shelves, its accurate prediction plays an important role in understanding how these huge glaciers – and the whole ice sheet itself – will change in coming years.

By Jon Fuhrmann, freelance science writer

References

Wilson, N., Straneo, F., and Heimbach, P.: Satellite-derived submarine melt rates and mass balance (2011–2015) for Greenland’s largest remaining ice tongues, The Cryosphere, 11, 2773-2782, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-2773-2017, 2017.

Hodgson, D. A. First synchronous retreat of ice shelves marks a new phase of polar deglaciation. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 108, 18859-18860, doi:10.1073/pnas.1116515108 (2011).

Münchow, A., L. Padman, P. Washam, and K.W. Nicholls. 2016. The ice shelf of Petermann Gletscher, North Greenland, and its connection to the Arctic and Atlantic OceansOceanography 29(4):84–95, https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2016.101.

Reeh N. (2017) Greenland Ice Shelves and Ice Tongues. In: Copland L., Mueller D. (eds) Arctic Ice Shelves and Ice Islands. Springer Polar Sciences. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1101-0_4

Truffer, M., and R. J. Motyka, Where glaciers meet water: Subaqueous melt and its relevance to glaciers in various settings, Rev. Geophys., 54, 220– 239. doi:10.1002/2015RG000494,  (2016)