GeoLog

Atmospheric Sciences

Geosciences Column: Thunderstorm asthma, the unexpected impact of lightning storms on pollen allergies.

Geosciences Column: Thunderstorm asthma, the unexpected impact of lightning storms on pollen allergies.

In October 2015 a series of massive thunderstorms rolled across the Eastern Mediterranean. In the hours and days that followed many people living along the Israeli coast had to go to their nearest medical centre because they were experiencing respiratory problems, which appeared very similar to asthma. But what could have caused these breathing problems? Well in research recently published in Natu ...[Read More]

#shareEGU20: meet the EGU Early Career Scientist Representatives (pt3)!

#shareEGU20: meet the EGU Early Career Scientist Representatives (pt3)!

Now #shareEGU20 has come to an end, division officers have changed and this includes the Early Career Scientists (ECS) Representatives. Time to meet them!   Union-level and Deputy Union-level ECS Representatives Anouk Beniest and Anita Di Chiara   Atmospheric Sciences Outgoing ECS Representative Fernando Iglesias-Suarez has one last message: “As the outgoing ECS-AS Rep, I am really ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Monday: Time-proven shelter in drifting snow

Imaggeo on Monday: Time-proven shelter in drifting snow

During my PhD I was working at the German Neumayer III station in Antarctica for my research on polar atmospheric chemistry. Since my instrument was set up on an observatory south of the main station, every day I would walk past a Scott pyramid tent to go and do my research. One day, in the midst of an Antarctic storm, I caught sight of the tent deep in the drifting snow, and took this picture. Th ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: The Tempest

Imaggeo on Mondays: The Tempest

Measuring the aurora. This picture was taken while doing an optical/radar coordinated campaign in Svalbard, Norway, near the settlement of Longyearbyen. In this campaign, we were measuring for the first time the polarisation of the auroral ‘red line’ of atomic oxygen with a photopolarimeter and were running the radars in order to have a better understanding of the state of the ionosphe ...[Read More]