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Simon Clark

Simon Clark is the Projects Coordination Officer at the European Geosciences Union. He is the point of contact for early career scientists (ECS) at the EGU Office. He is graduating with a PhD in Environmental Engineering from the University of Liverpool in the UK. You can find Simon on twitter @sunkensie.

GeoTalk: meet Jarmo Kikstra, researcher in energy transition under climate change!

Jarmo Kikstra

Hello Jarmo. Thank you for joining us for the interview today! Before we put our foot on the gas, could you tell us a little bit about yourself and your research? Hi Simon, nice to meet you! Thanks for inviting me to chat with you about my research, and perhaps a bit about the person behind this research – it’s an honour! The basics; I was born in the Netherlands and lived in South Korea, the UK, ...[Read More]

GeoTalk: meet Abraham Dabengwa, Early Career savanna conservationist!

Abraham Dabengwa

Hello Abraham. Thank you for speaking with us today! Could you tell our readers a bit about yourself and your research? Thanks, Simon! It’s a pleasure to be invited to share about my work. Well, where do I begin? For starters, I’m a Genus Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. I describe myself as an early-career African ecologist with a keen inte ...[Read More]

GeoTalk: meet Céline Heuzé, award-winning Early Career Ocean Scientist!

GeoTalk: meet Céline Heuzé, award-winning Early Career Ocean Scientist!

Hi Céline. Thank you for joining us today. Congratulations on winning the 2022 Ocean Sciences Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award! Could you tell our readers a bit about yourself and your research? As of just a few months ago, I am tenured! My exact job title is “Senior Lecturer in climatology” at the University of Gothenburg, in southwest Sweden. Originally I am from France, and I a ...[Read More]

How Ancient Egyptian Decline Synced With Hydrological Change….And How They Survived

How Ancient Egyptian Decline Synced With Hydrological Change….And How They Survived

Cairo’s survival was, is, and will be dependent on the flow of the Nile. Since the city was founded in 10th century CE the Nile’s scouring waters have left behind untouched ground onto which the city has spilled and grown. Modern Cairo’s youngest districts are closest to the Nile, founded on earth which was underwater centuries before. It is the river’s changing nature that made the Nile Val ...[Read More]