GeoLog

Margot Courtillat

Margot is one of the 2020 Virtual Press Assistants and 2022 on site Press Assistant. Graduated with a doctoral degree in Paleoceanography from the University of Perpignan in France, Margot specialises in microfossil (foraminifera) recognition and geochemistry (Nd and Sr isotopes). After taking part in an expedition in Antarctica she became very interested in science communication through blogging.

EGU22: The bitter reality behind fixed-term contracts

EGU22: The bitter reality behind fixed-term contracts

Monday evening’s Great Debate was definitely the place to be. Whether you were a PhD student, a professor, a research associate, a lecturer or, like me, a Postdoctoral researcher, this debate was here to raise awareness of the lack of permanent positions and the impact this has on a researcher’s career (and life!). As you may all know, getting a permanent position can sometimes feel like an ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Sunset in the Arabian basin

Imaggeo On Monday: Sunset in the Arabian basin

We know the topography of the moon better than the Earth’s seafloor, so we need to keep studying the ocean, and, for me, going to sea is the best way.   Only twenty percent of the seafloor is already mapped (see the Seabed 2030 Project), leaving eighty percent of our ocean unmapped, unobserved, and unexplored. This is why ocean going research is fundamental, not only for seabed mapping, ...[Read More]

Epic Journeys: New insights into wildlife and human migrations

Epic Journeys: New insights into wildlife and human migrations

Many wild animals make extraordinary long-distance journeys, whether by land, by air or even by sea. Ancestral, and even some modern, humans have likewise undertaken equally impressive odysseys across and between continents. In order to highlight these “epic journeys,” four different research projects were presented during an EGU press conference held on Wednesday. During the virtual presentations ...[Read More]

All at sea: UK women’s experiences of female leadership roles on ocean-going research vessels

All at sea: UK women’s experiences of female leadership roles on ocean-going research vessels

As I read the abstract of ‘Women in UK Ocean Science: Experiences of female leadership roles at sea’ by Katharine Hendry et al., it reminds me my own experience at sea! Indeed, more than one year ago, I had the chance to join the IODP Exp 379 in the Amundsen Sea (Antarctica) which was co-led by a woman, Julia Wellner from the University of Houston. It was her first IODP (International ...[Read More]