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storm surges

Imaggeo on Mondays: Coastal erosion

Imaggeo on Mondays: Coastal erosion

Coastlines take a battering from stormy seas, gales, windy conditions and every-day wave action. The combined effect of these processes shapes coastal landscapes across the globe.

In calm weather, constructive waves deposit materials eroded elsewhere and transported along the coast line via longshore-drift, onto beaches, thus building them up. Terrestrial material, brought to beaches by rivers and the wind, also contribute.  In stormy weather, waves become destructive, eroding material away from beaches and sea cliffs.

In some areas, the removal of material far exceeds the quantity of sediments being supplied to sandy stretches, leading to coastal erosion. It is a dynamic process, with the consequences depending largely on the geomorphology of the coast.

Striking images of receding coastlines, where households once far away from a cliff edge, tumble into the sea after a storm surge, are an all too familiar consequence of the power of coastal erosion.

In sandy beaches where dunes are common, coastal erosion can be managed by the addition of vegetation. In these settings, it is not only the force of the sea which drives erosion, but also wind, as the fine, loose sand grains are easily picked-up by the breeze, especially in blustery weather.

Grasses, such as the ones pictured in this week’s featured imaggeo image, work by slowing down wind speeds across the face of the dunes and trapping and stabilising wind-blown sands. The grasses don’t directly prevent erosion, but they do allow greater accumulation of sands over short periods of time, when compared to vegetation-free dunes.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Call for abstracts: The 9th Alexander von Humboldt Conference

The Alexander von Humboldt Conference is part of the EGU’s Topical Conference Series, and will be taking place in Istanbul, Turkey (24 – 28 March 2014). The aim of the meeting is to open a forum on natural hazard events that have a high impact and a large destructive potential, focussing on the Euro-Mediterranean Region in particular.

The theme for the conference can be broken down into nine broad areas:

  • Physical and Probabilistic Approaches to Earthquakes
  • Physics and Characterisation of Tsunamis
  • Monitoring and Risk of Volcanic Hazards
  • Hydro-Meteorological Hazards
  • Other High Impact Mediterranean Hazards (e.g., asteroid impacts, wildfires, terrigenous and submarine landslides, flooding, storm surges)
  • Complexity Analysis Approaches to Natural Hazards
  • Loss Models and Risk Assessment for Natural Catastrophes
  • What constitutes a prediction, what does not? Good Practice when Proposing Predictions of Natural Hazards
  • Communications and Education of Natural Hazard Knowledge  in the Mediterranean Region to Policy Makers, Students and the Public

In addition to the broad scientific topics, the conference will address risk assessment, communicating with the public and policymakers, and what is appropriate good practice when proposing natural hazard “predictions”.

You can submit your abstract to any one of the topics listed above until 31 January 2014. You can  register for the conference here.

Looking out over the Bosphorus from the conference location – great science and a great view! (Credit: Ali Ozgun Konca)

Looking out over the Bosphorus from the conference location – great science and a great view! (Credit: Ali Ozgun Konca)

To find out more about the 9th Alexander von Humboldt Conference: High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region, please see the conference website.

Update (07/01/13): Abstract submission and registration deadline extended to 31 January 2014.