GeoLog

glaciers

GeoTalk: Meet Larissa van der Laan, glaciologist and science-artist!

GeoTalk: Meet Larissa van der Laan, glaciologist and science-artist!

Hi Larissa, thankyou for spending time with us today! To break the ice, could you tell us a little about yourself and your research? Ha, I see what you did there. I’m Larissa, she/her, 29, and a PhD candidate at the Institute of Hydrology and Water Resources Management in Hannover, Germany. I’ve been fascinated by snow and ice since I was little, writing my first ever school report and ...[Read More]

GeoTalk: Meet Rebekka Steffen, the Geodesy Division’s Early Career Scientist Representative

GeoTalk: Meet Rebekka Steffen, the Geodesy Division’s Early Career Scientist Representative

Hello Rebekka, thank you for taking the time to talk with us today! Could you introduce yourself to our readers? Hi. Thanks for giving me the chance to talk about my research and plans as ECS Rep for the Geodesy Division. I’m a researcher in Geodesy at Lantmäteriet, which is the Swedish mapping, cadastral, and land registration authority (I prefer the much shorter Swedish version 😉). I’m working i ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: When boulders hitch a ride from glaciers

Imaggeo on Mondays: When boulders hitch a ride from glaciers

Glen More, on the Isle of Mull, Scotland, is a classic locality for studying glacial landforms and sediments. Here, two prominent ice-transported boulders stand guard at the head of the valley, left behind after the Loch Lomond Readvance (Younger Dryas stade), the final pulse of Quaternary glaciation in Scotland. Behind them in the characteristic U-shaped valley, hummocky morraines are littered wi ...[Read More]

Geosciences Column: How fast are Greenland’s glaciers melting into the sea?

Geosciences Column: How fast are Greenland’s glaciers melting into the sea?

The Greenland ice sheet is undergoing rapid change, and nowhere more so than at its margins, where large outlet glaciers reach sea level. Because these glaciers are fed by very large reservoirs of ice, they don’t just flow to the coast, but can extend many kilometres out into the ocean. Here, the ice – being lighter than water – will float, but remain connected to the ice on the mainland. This phe ...[Read More]