GeoLog

General Assembly

Last chance to enter the EGU Photo Competition 2019!

Last chance to enter the EGU Photo Competition 2019!

If you are pre-registered for the 2019 General Assembly (Vienna, 7-12 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! Winners receive a free registration to next year’s General Assembly! But hurry, there are only a few days left to enter!

Every year we hold a photo competition and exhibit in association with our open access image repository, Imaggeo, and our annual General Assembly. There is also a moving image competition, which features a short clip of continuous geoscience footage. Pre-registered conference participants can take part by submitting up to three original photos and/or one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary and space sciences.

Shortlisted photos will be exhibited at the conference, together with the winning moving image, which will be selected by a panel of judges. General Assembly participants can vote for their favorite photos and the winning images will be announced on the last day of the meeting.

How to enter

You will need to register on Imaggeo to upload your image, which will also be included in the database. When you’ve uploaded it, you’ll have the option to edit the image details – here you can enter it into the EGU Photo Contest – just check the checkbox! The deadline for submissions is 15 February.

Previous winning photographs can be seen on the 201020112012,  201320142015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 winners’ pages.

EGU 2019 will take place from 07 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

Do’s and don’ts for attending your first General Assembly

Do’s and don’ts for attending your first General Assembly

The prospect of attending a large international conference during your PhD can be really daunting, especially if you’re only in your second year and in the early stages of data collection. That’s why I hadn’t planned on going to one until my third year. But thanks to winning some travel funds, this time last year I was preparing to attend the EGU General Assembly 2018 in Vienna, a scary but exciting opportunity that I am so glad I took.

I received lots of great advice before I went, but also found out things when I was there that I wish I had known in advance. So here is my list of do’s and dont’s for attending your first General Assembly.

DO
Go on fieldtrips and events.

In 2018 the EGU Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology (GMPV) Division organised a pre-conference fieldtrip to the Bohemian Massif in Austria, specifically targeted towards early career researchers. Not being the type to pass up a chance to get into the field, I signed up right away. This was a great opportunity to get to meet new people, and not long after we bundled into minibuses and started driving into the Austrian countryside we were chatting away pleasantly.

Making friends before the conference means that you have a big group of friendly faces that you know when you’re at the conference, a vital crutch when giving presentations!

There was also a GMPV mid-conference social event, involving what else but tango lessons! Even though I didn’t get up and dance myself, it was a fun and interesting event and another good way to meet other researchers.

To find out about such events you can look for pre/post conference workshops in the session programme, keep an eye on the division social media accounts, and make use of the resources available for early career researchers both before and at the conference itself.

Excellent example of domino boudinage on show near Spitz, during the pre-conference fieldtrip on “Deformation in the lower crust”. (Credit: Stacy Phillips)

DON’T
Be scared to talk to people at their posters.

It still takes a little time for me to stop feeling anxious and go up to people at their posters, especially if they’re eminent researchers. One way to calm the nerves is to find a poster you are interested in that already has someone there and tag along in their discussion. This gives you a little time to read the poster and decide if you want to ask a question. You could also just ask a presenter standing by their poster to give you a run-through of their work. Build up your confidence and you’ll be talking to the big-shots in no time!

DO
Sign up for the mentoring programme.

The hardest people to meet at the General Assembly are the well-established researchers in your field, but the EGU Mentoring Programme is a great way to get to those people. You are typically assigned to a mid-career researcher in your area, and you are encouraged to meet up with them at least at the Sunday Ice Breaker event and Monday morning planning meeting, if not continually throughout the week. I signed up for this and found it very helpful. Through my mentor I was introduced to lots of other people that I wouldn’t have met otherwise. Although we saw each other a number of times during the week as we were attending the same talks, I didn’t take full advantage of my mentor and I wish I had. So, sign up and chat to your mentor often! The deadline to register for the programme is 31 January.

DO
Plan what you want to go see.

The General Assembly mobile app is an essential scheduling tool. It’s really easy to use and it allows you to create your own personal programme by ‘starring’ events of interest. I also found it very helpful to have the list of abstracts on hand and see what presentations are coming up next when sitting in on a session. I highly recommend downloading it and sorting out your plan of attack in advance! EGU will be releasing the General Assembly mobile app closer to the conference, so stay tuned!

DON’T
Try and be in multiple places at once.

One disadvantage of creating your own programme through the app is that you end up ‘starring’ several talks only to then find out that you can’t see them all! If you plan to chop and change rooms, leaving one session to see a different talk and then coming back, it’s very possible those two rooms will be at opposite ends of the venue. And the conference centre is HUGE! Travel time between rooms should not be underestimated (hence why venue staff can be seen zipping about on scooters!). Also, given that it’s likely one of those sessions will be running a little ahead of time or late, chances are you won’t make all the talks you want to attend. Keep it simple and try to stay in one room at a time, or at least sit near the door and give yourself a couple of talks leeway so you don’t miss out on the science!

That feeling when you realise you’ve missed the talk you ran across the conference centre for… (Part of a water fountain in central Vienna). (Credit: Stacy Phillips)

DO
Go to something you wouldn’t normally go to.

If you find yourself with some spare time, you can use the General Assembly app to see what sessions and talks are happening at that moment. Go listen to a talk in a completely separate field; you’ll learn something new and see how different people give presentations! Get involved in something that you haven’t tried before. You could wander from a talk on metamorphic petrology, to a poster on the strength of oil-bearing reservoir rocks, to a geoscience-themed games night! The General Assembly has it all!

DON’T
Spend all your time at the conference centre.

A consistent piece of advice I received was to not spend the entire week at the conference centre. There will be days or mornings where there will be nothing relevant to you. So, take the chance to explore the wonderful city of Vienna! Go on a walking tour, experience an authentic Viennese coffee house, or visit one of the many museums. Then when you return to the conference you will be refreshed and ready to absorb more of the latest science EGU has to offer. And you’ll have a handy conversation starter! If you really can’t tear yourself away from the science though, go grab some food from the small supermarket at the venue and at least have lunch in the park!

EGU attendees get reduced admission to Vienna Museum of Natural History, although we didn’t have time to make it out of the fossil and mineral section! Here’s a fabulous sample of kyanite, my favourite mineral! (Credit: Stacy Phillips)

DO
Make use of social media.

If social media is your thing, the #EGU19 conference hashtag is a great way to stay current with meeting updates as well as connect with people and find out about their work. There are lots of TV screens throughout the venue that have a live feed of the hashtag on Twitter, and seeing your tweet up there for a couple minutes of fame is pretty cool. It’s also really useful. My poster was on the Friday afternoon and I was worried that no one would be around to see it! So, I put up my poster early on the Friday morning, tweeted a photo of me next to it, and then stood by my poster whenever I had a free moment. Someone who I wanted to talk to but who wasn’t around for the poster session saw my tweet and found me. We had a really fruitful discussion, all because of one photo and 240 characters.

Presenting my poster was a lot of fun and a great opportunity to talk to people who could help guide my future work. (Credit: Stacy Phillips)

DO
Wear comfortable shoes.

I said above, I stood by my poster for most of the Friday. I was wearing comfortable shoes, but my feet were so sore the following day! (That may have also had something to do with the dancing at the conveners’ party…) You’ll be doing a lot of walking at the General Assembly and footwear is not something you should neglect!

DON’T
Bring big bulky bags.

You will be packing your bag each morning and convincing yourself that you need your laptop, your massive notebook and those papers you need to read. Sooner or later your bag will be bursting at the seams, and by the end of the day you’ll realise that you didn’t use any of the things you brought along. If you have and can make do with just your smartphone or a small tablet, then bring those (plus chargers!) and a small notebook (put in your name and details, in case you lose it).

DO
Bring a water bottle or reusable coffee cup.

Geoscientists should all be singing from a similar hymn sheet when it comes to saving the environment. So, it was great to see the abundant water fountains throughout the conference venue. Though I was surprised by the lack of re-usable coffee cups on show. There are regular coffee breaks to sustain everyone, and although there are recyclable bins where you can dispose of your cups, you could should just bring your own!

This is by no means an exhaustive list of things you should and shouldn’t do, and it doesn’t cover every aspect of what to expect at your first General Assembly, but hopefully it is a helpful guide. If you’re preparing for your first EGU meeting, you will probably be a little nervous, as I was this time last year. But I am confident that you’ll have a great week, talk about cutting-edge science, and make a wonderful array of connections, as I did in 2018. Good luck and feel free to ask questions or get in touch with me! You can find me on Twitter @Shtacy_Phillips. and do come say hi to me at EGU 2019!

EGU 2018 in numbers. See you in 2019! (Credit: Stacy Phillips)

by Stacy Phillips, PhD student at Open University, United Kingdom

Stacy Phillips is a 2nd year PhD student at the Open University. She is investigating the role of crustal melting in the Himalaya by looking at kyanite leucogranites from Bhutan, Eastern Himalaya. This involves a combination of petrology, geochemistry, geochronology and P-T modelling to understand how these melts formed. Her interests in science communication have led to the creation of the Fieldwork Diaries podcast and she is an avid user of Twitter (@Shtacy_Phillips) for science communication (and the odd rant about sports). When not busy doing or communicating science you can find her taking photos of Lego minifigures (on Instagram @ShtacyP).

EGU 2019 will take place from 07 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

 

What’s new for the 2019 General Assembly?

What’s new for the 2019 General Assembly?

Along with our conference organisers, Copernicus, we aim to improve the experience of General Assembly attendees with each passing year. Over the last few months we’ve introduced some changes that we hope will make the 2019 edition of our meeting even better! This post highlights the new rules for submitting an abstract and some changes that returning participants will notice at next year’s conference.

Abstract submission rules

An ever-growing number of participants means making sure that all participants at the EGU annual General Assembly are able to present their work in a comfortable manner in the years to come. One of the measures adopted to ensure all presentations (orals, posters and PICOs) find a place is the introduction of the one-abstract rule.

Authors are allowed as first author to submit either one regular abstract plus one abstract solicited by a convener, or two solicited abstracts. A second regular abstract can be submitted to the Educational and Outreach Sessions (EOS) programme group (maximum number of abstracts, including solicited abstracts, remains two). Possible submissions for first authors are: 1 regular + 1 solicited abstract; or 2 solicited abstracts; or 1 regular or solicited abstract + 1 EOSabstract (regular or solicited). Note that authors will need to provide a transaction number (TAN) when submitting their additional solicited abstract. This TAN has to be provided by the convener. Participants can be co-authors on additional abstracts in which they are not first author.

Another change for the EGU General Assembly 2019 is that only 2019 EGU members will be able to submit an abstract as first authors (co-authors are not required to have a membership). You can become a member or renew your membership online on the EGU website (www.egu.eu/membership/) or while registering for the General Assembly. Students receive a 50% discount in their EGU membership rates, and all EGU members benefit from substantially reduced registration rates to the meeting, amongst other benefits. More information on these new abstract submission rules are available on EGU’s call-for-abstracts announcement.

The new changes to the conference programme schedule will provide a more comfortable meeting experience for all! (Credit: EGU/Keri McNamara)

Conference programme schedule

The scheduling of the conference programme will also see some changes at the upcoming General Assembly. The new schedule features posters, orals and PICOs throughout the day, uses time blocks of 105 minutes, and includes a dedicated networking slot. Note that posters and orals of the same session will not be scheduled at the same time. This schedule change will allow us to fit more oral presentations in the meeting, give more viewing time for posters and PICOs, and provide a more comfortable meeting experience for all. A dedicated networking slot will give attendees additional time to discuss and interact with colleagues, to view posters and to visit the exhibition.

As in the past, each day of the EGU General Assembly in 2019 will begin at 08:30 and end at 20:00, will be organised in time blocks (TBs), and have a number of breaks. However, most TBs will now be 15 minutes longer and will feature all presentations types, as follows:

  • 08:30–10:15 TB1: Posters, orals, PICOs
  • 10:15–10:45 Coffee break
  • 10:45–12:30 TB2: Posters, orals, PICOs
  • 12:30–14:00 Lunch break
  • 14:00–15:45 TB3: Posters, orals, PICOs
  • 15:45–16:15 Coffee break
  • 16:15–18:00 TB4: Posters, orals, PICOs
  • 18:00–19:00 TB5: Networking, meet EGU, exhibition, and extra poster viewing
  • 19:00–20:00 TB6: Townhalls, some medal lectures, some short courses, special events

More information and a detailed time schedule are in the EGU news item.

Offset your travel carbon footprint when registering

Finally, we are taking steps to make the General Assembly greener. Last year we implemented a number of initiatives to reduce the environmental impact of the meeting, including giving participants the opportunity to offset the CO2 emissions resulting from their travel to and from Vienna. People who used this option while registering contributed to a project to reduce deforestation in Brazil. As a result of this initiative we raised nearly €17,000 for the carbon offsetting scheme!

In 2019, conference registrants will be able to donate to one of three different carbon-offset projects by choosing the carbon-offsetting option when registering to the meeting. The money collected from you will then be forwarded to carbonfootprint.com to be invested in your selected project:

1) Wayang Windu Phase 2 Geothermal Power Project
Type: Geothermal
Location: Indonesia, Asia

2) Borehole Rehabilitation Project in Uganda
Type: Clean Drinking Water
Location: Uganda, Africa

3) Efficient Cookstove Programme
Type: Household Cookstoves
Location: Kenya, Africa

We’re striving to add further measures for 2019, so stay tuned to the EGU blog and website for further details on new green initiatives. We look forward to seeing you in Vienna!

EGU 2019 will take place from 07 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

EGU 2019: Registration open & townhall and splinter meeting requests

EGU 2019: Registration open & townhall and splinter meeting requests

The EGU General Assembly brings together geoscientists from all over the world to one meeting that covers all disciplines of the Earth, planetary and space sciences. The conference is taking place in Vienna on 7–12 April 2019, providing an opportunity for both established scientists and early career researchers to present their work and discuss their ideas with experts in all fields of the geosciences.

Registration and abstract submission

Early registration for the conference is open until 28 February 2019. You can register online on the Register and Venue section of the General Assembly website.

Note that EGU members benefit from reduced registration rates! If you register to attend the conference before 28 February 2019 and you are an EGU member, your weekly ticket will cost €390. A similar early-bird discount is available to non-members, but weekly ticket costs are significantly higher: €530. Students and emeritus attendees enjoy reduced rates as well, and they face even lower ticket costs when registering both before the early-bird deadline as and EGU members.

Those registering after 28 February will no longer enjoy early registration discounts, regardless of their membership and career status. To become a member, or renew your EGU membership, go to www.egu.eu/membership/.

You can get a feel for the great geoscience that will be discussed at the meeting by browsing through the EGU 2019 sessions. Clicking on ‘please select’ allows you to search for sessions by Programme Group. You’ll then be able to view the sessions in more detail and submit an abstract to its relevant session.

As announced a few weeks ago, only one abstract as first author will be permitted, with a few exceptions. Authors are allowed as first author to submit either one regular abstract plus one abstract solicited by a convener, or two solicited abstracts. A second regular abstract can be submitted to the Educational and Outreach Sessions (EOS) programme group.

In addition, only EGU members will be able to submit abstracts to the meeting. You can become a member or renew your membership online on the EGU website or while registering for the EGU General Assembly.

The deadline for abstract submission is 10 January 2019, 13:00 CET. The full meeting programme will be made available in late February 2019.

Submit your townhall and splinter meeting requests

Also available on the conference website are the request forms for townhall and splinter meetings.

Townhall meetings are meetings open to all conference participants. At townhall meetings, new initiatives or decisions are announced to a larger audience, followed by an open discussion on the matter raised. If you’d like to organise a townhall, be sure to submit your request before 18 January 2019.

During the conference, side meetings on non-commercial matters organized by participants can be reserved for two successive time blocks free of charge in the rooms mentioned below. Commercial meetings are subject to a charge dependent on the meeting size – for details check the website. Be sure to submit your splinter-meeting request before 22 March 2019.

More details about the short courses, splinter and townhall meetings at the conference will be given in an upcoming blog post.

For more information about the General Assembly, please see the EGU 2019 website.

EGU 2019 will take place from 07 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.