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EGU network blogs

Revamping the EGU blog network: call for bloggers

Revamping the EGU blog network: call for bloggers

The EGU blog network is getting a make-over! Since 2013 the network blogs have enjoyed thought-provoking and engaging contributions by Simon Redfern, Dan Schillereff and Laura Roberts, Jon Tennant, as well as Will Morgan on a range of topics: from the workings of the inner Earth, through to geomorphology, palaeontology and air quality. However, the individual circumstances of the bloggers now mean that it is no longer viable for them to regularly update their blogs. As such, it is with sadness that we announce that we are saying goodbye to Atom’s Eye on the Planet, Geology Jenga, Green Tea and Velociraptors and Polluting the Internet. From the EGU, we thank Simon, Dan, Laura, Jon and Will for contributing excellent content to the blogs and wish them the very best of luck for the future.

To complete the make-over, we’d like to find new blogs to take the place of the departing network blogs. If you are an Earth, planetary or space researcher (a PhD student, an early career scientist, or a more established one) with a passion for communicating your work, we’d like to hear from you!

We currently feature blogs in international development (Geology for Global Development), geochemistry (GeoSphere), volcanology, (VolcanincDegassing) and geopolicy (Four Degrees). We’d love to receive blog proposals from fields within the Earth, planetary and space sciences we don’t yet feature. The network aims at fostering a diverse community of geoscience bloggers, sharing accurate information about geoscientific research in a language understandable not only to fellow scientists but also to the broader public. You, as an expert in your own research area, are in a better position than we are to share recent development in your area of research.

The benefits: apart from your site gaining exposure by having its posts listed on the front page of the EGU website, we will also share highlights of your work on our social media channels (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Instagram) and advertise the blog network at our General Assembly, which has over 12,000 attendees. And, of course, you’ll get to join a great community of bloggers!

With the exception of VolcanicDegassing, the network blogs are authored by early career researchers. In this call for bloggers we are particularly keen to add diversity to the network, and particularly welcome applications from more established scientists.

Having an existing blog is not a requirement for application. However, if you don’t have a blog already, we’d like you to have at least some experience of writing for a broader audience, be it as a guest blogger, or contributing to outlets such as The Conversation, for instance. In this case, let us know what you’d like your blog to be called, what topics you would cover, and link to articles you’ve published in the past.

If you’d like your blog (or blog idea) to be considered for our network, fill out this form by 8th August.

Please note that only blogs in English will be considered, as this is the EGU working language, and the language of the blog network. We particularly encourage applications from all European countries, not just English-speaking countries, but bloggers from outside Europe can also apply.

Feel free to contact the EGU Communications Officer Laura Roberts if you have any questions. In the meantime – happy blogging!

Looking back at the EGU Blogs in 2015: welcoming new additions

Looking back at the EGU Blogs in 2015: welcoming new additions

It’s a little over 12 months since we launched the new look EGU blogs and with the holidays and new year approaching, what better time to take stock of 2015 as featured in the EGU Blogs? The past year has been full of exciting, insightful and informative blog posts. At the same time, we’ve welcomed new additions to the network and division blogs.

The network blogs

A recent highlight of the year has to be the addition of a new blog to the network: please welcome our new blogger Professor David Pyle, author of VolcanicDegassing – a blog about volcanoes and volcanic activity. In 2016 you can look forward to posts about David’s ongoing research in Latin America, the Caribbean, Ethiopia and Europe, as well as historical and contemporary descriptions or other representations of volcanic activity across the globe.

Vesuvius in eruption, April 26, 1872. Original caption ‘from a photograph taken in the neighbourhood of Naples”. (Palmieri and Mallet, 1873). Published in the Decemeber 15th post:  'The first volcanic eruption to be photographed?'

Vesuvius in eruption, April 26, 1872. Original caption ‘from a photograph taken in the neighbourhood of Naples”. (Palmieri and Mallet, 1873). Published in the Decemeber 15th post: ‘The first volcanic eruption to be photographed?

Richly illustrated and referenced posts have featured across the network throughout the year, with topics ranging from the journey aerosol particles go on throughout their life time, through to the role peculiarities of geology and geomorphology play in deciding on big international governance.

The most popular post written in 2015 was brought to you by Jon Tennant and featured the ichthyosaurs, an unusual turtle-fish-dolphin like marine reptile which cruised the seas 250 million years ago. The post focuses on the discovery of an ichthyosaur fossil named David, or rather Cartorhynchus lenticarpu as it is formally known, and how the remarkable specimen sheds light on the origins of these unusual creatures.

Matt Herod’s post on Geosphere in early December 2014 featuring the story behind the legal battle of Italian geochemists who were sued after publishing results stating that they could not find above background levels of depleted uranium in former Italian military firing ranges, is the second most read post across the network in the past year. With a strong resemblance to the L’Aquila verdict against the Italian seismologists, which was resolved in 2014, Matt highlights there are lessons to be learnt from both cases in the post.

Natural hazards and the April 2015 Nepal earthquakes featured heavily across the network too. In the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, the Geology for Global Development blog compiled a comprehensive list of links and resources which readers could consult to find out up to date and reliable information about the events in Nepal. A list which is still a useful resource some 8 months after the tragedy and which is the third most popular post on the network this year. Simon Redfern, of Atom’s Eye View of the Planet, wrote a piece on how and why scientists have identified Kathmandu valley as one of the most dangerous places in the world, in terms of earthquake risk.

With many of the network bloggers being in the thick of PhD research or having recently submitted their thesis, tips and hints for a successful PhD completion also proved a focus of the content across the network. Despite being originally written in April 2013, Jon Tennant’s blog post on why and how masters students should publish their research was the most popular post of the year! The most read post from Geology Jenga advertised a new, and free, online course on how to survive the PhD journey.

The division blogs

Since their launch last December, the division blogs have gone from strength to strength. Keeping you updated with news and information relevant to each division, they have also featured accounts of field and laboratory work, as well as professional development opportunities and open vacancies.

Throughout the year the division blogs have been enhanced through the addition of the Atmospheric Sciences, Energy Resources and Environment blogs and, most recently, the Biogeosciences Division blog too.

Cross-section of the age of the Greenland Ice Sheet from radar data. Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and MacGregor et al., 2015.

Cross-section of the age of the Greenland Ice Sheet from radar data. Credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio and MacGregor et al., 2015.

The most popular post of the year was shared by the Seismology Division and touched upon the controversial topic of whether cloud formations can be used to predict earthquakes, while the Cryosphere Division blog’s image of the week of late October featuring a cross section of the Greenland Ice Sheet was the second most popular post. Round-up posts about the 2015 General Assembly, tips for convening sessions at the conference, as shared by Geodesy Division, and some soul searching by the Geomorphology Division as to why a proposed session wasn’t included in the final conference programme also proved very popular.

Get involved

Are you a budding science writer, or want to try your hand at science communication? All the EGU Blogs, from GeoLog (the official EGU blog), through to the network and division blogs, welcome guest contributions from scientists, students and professionals in the Earth, planetary and space sciences.

It couldn’t be easier to get involved. Decide what you’d like to write about, find the blog that is the best fit for your post and contact the blog editor – you can find all editor details on the individual blog pages. If in doubt, you can submit your idea for a post via the Submit a Post page on GeoLog, or email the EGU Communications Officer, Laura Roberts, who can help with initial enquiries and introduce you to individual blog editors.

Don’t forget to a look at the blog pages for a flavour of the content you can expect from the new, and existing, blogs in 2016. The blogs are also a great place to learn about new opportunities, exciting fields of research and keep up to date with news relating to the upcoming 2016 General Assembly.

Join the EGU Blog Network!

Join the EGU Blog Network!

After announcing earlier this week that we are sadly saying goodbye to the EGU network blog Between a Rock and Hard Place, the time has come to find a new blog to take their place. If you are an Earth, planetary or space researcher (a PhD student, an early career scientist, or a more established one) with a passion for communicating your work, we’d like to hear from you!

We currently feature blogs in palaeontology (Green Tea and Velociraptors), international development (Geology for Global Development), geochemistry (GeoSphere), atmospheric sciences (Polluting the Internet), and more! Initially, we are looking to fill the gap left in the network by Between a Rock and Hard Place, which covered broad themes within volcanology and petrology. But, with so much great geoscience out there, we’d love to receive blog proposals from more fields within the Earth, planetary and space sciences we don’t yet feature on the network. This also means we may not limit the addition to the EGU network to one blog; if there is more than one strong candidate we’ll consider expanding the network further.

The network aims at fostering a diverse community of geoscience bloggers, sharing accurate information about geoscientific research in a language understandable not only to fellow scientists but also to the broader public. You, as an expert in your own research area, are in a better position than we are to share recent development in your area of research.

The benefits: apart from your site gaining exposure by having its posts listed on the front page of the EGU website, we will also share highlights of your work on our social media channels (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+) and advertise the blog network at our General Assembly, which has over 12,000 attendees. And, of course, you’ll get to join a great community of bloggers!

With the exception of An Atom’s-Eye View of the Planet, the network blogs are authored by early career researchers. In this call for bloggers we are particularly keen to add diversity to the network, and particularly welcome applications from more established scientists.

Having an existing blog is not a requirement for application. However, if you don’t have a blog already, we’d like you to have at least some experience of writing for a broader audience, be it as a guest blogger, or contributing to outlets such as The Conversation, for instance. In this case, let us know what you’d like your blog to be called, what topics you would cover, and link to articles you’ve published in the past.

If you’d like your blog (or blog idea) to be considered for our network, fill out this form by 11th September.

Join the EGU Network blogs . Credit: ClkerFreeVectorImages (distributed via  pixabay)

Join the EGU Network blogs . Credit: ClkerFreeVectorImages (distributed via pixabay)

Please note that only blogs in English will be considered, as this is the EGU working language, and the language of the blog network. We particularly encourage applications from all European countries, not just English-speaking countries, but bloggers from outside Europe can also apply.

Feel free to contact the EGU Communications Officer Laura Roberts if you have any questions. In the meantime – happy blogging!

The EGU Network blogs are looking for guest contributions

Are you a budding science writer, or want to try your hand at science communication? You might just be the person for our EGU network bloggers! A number of our network blogs would like to give their pages a bit of a boost and are seeking guest bloggers to contribute new, informative and engaging posts on an ad hoc basis.

If you’ve recently been thinking about trying your hand at blogging, but aren’t sure if it’s for you or simply have a great story or research that you’d like to see ‘in print’, why not give guest blogging a try? Read on to find out which blogs are looking for contributions.

Four Degrees

4degreesWritten by Flo Bullough and Marion Ferrat , Four Degrees, looks at environmental geoscience issues from a science for policy perspective. Environmental geochemistry, climate change, policy and sustainability are brought together in this blog and explored at the interface between science and society.

Flo and Marion are looking for guest contributions, but would also be happy to welcome a more regular blogger to their team. So if you are interested in geoscience and policy and are looking for the opportunity to get into some regular science writing, fill out this form and Flo and Marion will be in touch soon!

Geology for Global Development (GfGD)

GfGDGfGD is a UK-based organisation, working to support young geologists to make an effective contribution to international development. The network blog is a place for the organisation to share articles, discussions, photographs and news about the role of geology within sustainable development and the fight against global poverty

Blog editor, and founder of the organisation, Joel Gill, has his hands full running the blog, the organisation and completing his PhD. As a result, the blog is particularly looking for guest contributions which explore the principles of international development and how the earth sciences can make a difference. Take a look at the blog for some inspiration and pitch your ideas to Joel using this form.

Geology Jenga

JengaA broad range of topics find their way into the posts of Geology Jenga, with authors Dan Schillereff and Laura Roberts Artal writing about all things science communication, their careers as budding academics, as well as the science behind geophysics and geomorphology.

However, since finishing their PhDs, the demands of their 9 to 5 jobs mean that Dan and Laura have less time to write and would welcome guest contributions on any of the topics above. If you’d like to contribute to the blog, why not get in touch with them using this form?

GeoSphere

GeoSphereThe term geosphere is an all-encompassing word that incorporates just about every aspect of the earth sciences. This means that topics ranging from geophysics to geochemistry to geobiology are part of the geosphere. The blog Geosphere honours its namesake by covering any and every topic in the geosciences. However, with blog author, Matt Herod’s research interests in geochemistry and hydrogeology you’ll likely find more posts on these topics.

Matt aims to make science clear for anyone that should stumble upon the geosciences and enhance awareness of the geosphere. If these goals resonate with you, then you writing for the Geosphere blog might just be the thing for you. Why not get in touch with Matt using this form?

Polluting the Internet

PollutingWill Morgan, an atmospheric sciences researcher from the University of Manchester, blogs at Polluting the Internet. Focusing on tiny particles suspended in our atmosphere, called aerosols, which can build up and pollute our skies. In the blog, Will explores current research in aerosol science, as well as his fieldwork exploits in pursuit of these tiny particles.

If this is your area of research too and you’d like to contribute a guest blog post on the subject, why not give it a go! You can get in touch with Will by filling out this form.

Green Tea and Velociraptors

GreenWhilst swamped by the writing of the thesis, Jon welcomes guest contributions to his blog too. Covering the subject of palaeontology as well as regularly writing about science communication and the open science movement, the blog has a diverse readership and offers a great platform for anyone how has something to say about these topics. Get in touch with Jon using this form.

The network blogs cover a range of topics in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, with the aim to foster a diverse community of geoscientist bloggers. If you’d like to submit a guest blog post, please fill out the forms available above. For general guest blogging guidelines, please refer to the submit a post page on the EGU official blog GeoLog.