GeoLog

EGU General Assembly 2018

EGU 2018 General Assembly programme is now online!

EGU 2018 General Assembly programme is now online!

The EGU General Assembly 2018 programme is available here. Take a look and – if you haven’t already – register for the conference by 1 March to make the early registration rates!

This year’s scientific programme of the General Assemby includes Union-wide Sessions, such as the medal lectures, great debates, short courses, education and outreach symposia, as well as townhall and splinter meetings, just to name a few.

The Disciplinary Sessions and Interdisciplinary Events, encompass the oral, poster and PICO sessions covering the full spectrum of the Earth, planetary and space sciences.

There are several ways to access the programme, so you can explore the sessions with ease:

  • Browse by day & time: view the oral, poster and PICO sessions by their time and location, each sorted chronologically by conference day, time block and programme group
  • Browse by session: view the scientific sessions and their oral, poster and PICO sub-sessions by programme group
  • Personal programme: a great tool to generate your own personal programme, just select the specific presentations or sessions you’re interested in to create your own personal schedule
  • Sessions of ECS interest: this is a list of sessions of particular interest for early career scientists
  • Papers of special interest: take a look at the abstracts that were selected by their respective session conveners to be of interest to the press, media and the public

Want more ways to browse the programme? We’ll be releasing the EGU 2018 mobile app closer to the conference, stay tuned!

We look forward to seeing you in Vienna for the General Assembly (8 – 13 April 2018).

GeoTalk: Stephanie Zihms, Early Career Scientist Representative

GeoTalk: Stephanie Zihms, Early Career Scientist Representative

In addition to the usual GeoTalk interviews, where we highlight the work and achievements of early career researchers, this month we’ll also introduce one of the Division early career scientist representatives (ECS). They are responsible for ensuring that the voice of EGU ECS membership is heard. From organising short courses during the General Assembly, through to running and attending regular ECS representative meetings, their tasks in this role are varied. Their role is entirely voluntary and they are all active members of their research community, so we’ll also be touching on their scientific work during the interview.

Today we are talking to Stephanie Zihms, ECS representative for the Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics (EMRP) Division and the incoming Union-level ECS representative. Interested in getting involved with EGU and its activities for early career scientists? Consider applying for one of the vacant representative positions

Before we get stuck in, could you introduce yourself and tell us a little more about yourself and your career?

Where to start, I’m originally from Germany but moved to the UK in 2005 for an year and ended up staying. I have had a varied career and would probably call myself a multidisciplinary geoscientist.

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Earth Science from the University of Glasgow (2007), I worked for a geotechnical drilling company in Scotland as a geologist. However, I still had a drive to further my education, so following the economic downturn in 2008-2009, I started my PhD in Civil & Environmental Engineering from University of Strathclyde. After my PhD, I left academia again to work for the British Geological Survey, where for 14 months I studied the impact of heat on bentonite for radioactive waste disposal. This wasn’t quite the right fit for me, and I left to go back to academia for a postdoc.

In January 2015 I joined Heriot-Watt University, originally for a postdoc position looking at CO2 bubble behaviour in flow conditions (definitely a ‘tide me over’ position). After 4 months I joined the Institute of Petroleum Engineering for a geomechanics postdoc – finally working with rocks again. Now I have a postdoc in the Heriot-Watt University Lyell Centre studying fracture flow. This postdoc is great since it combines my experience from my previous postdoc and my time at the British Geological Survey.

Outside of work I love running, and I am currently training for a half marathon. I started running again after I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis to better manage my mental health and increase my overall fitness.

Although we touch upon it in the introduction of this post: could you tell us what your role as ECS representative has involved and explain your new role as the Union-level ECS representative?

I was the first ECS representative for the EMRP Division and was kind of thrown in the deep end, but it was great to have some freedom to shape the role within the division. The biggest part is being the link between the division president and officers and the ECS community. I attend online meetings where all the ECS representatives exchange ideas, discuss issues and find solutions or support. For EMRP, I set up the division Twitter account and recruited some other ECS to help me run a Facebook page. Most divisions have a small team, which is a great way to get involved. At the 2017 General Assembly I organised an ECS dinner (open to all EMRP scientists) which went really well with over 40 scientists attending. We are planning to host a similar event at this year’s General Assembly.

As the Union-level ECS representative, I will be the link between the Union and the ECS via the division representatives. This is a very important role since it will be my job to represent the work the ECS representatives have done and present any changes the ECS representatives would like to see. Of course, I will have help from the new incoming Union-level representative Raffaele Albano, the EGU Outreach Committee, and you as the communication officer*.

I’m looking forward to working with you! So, why did you put yourself forward for these positions?

I volunteered for both roles because I think it’s important for ECS to have a say, get involved and have proper representation. We are the future of research and our voice should be counted. I am a big believer in peer-support and the ECS representatives provide this in a very positive way. It is also a great opportunity to get to know the insides of the EGU better and how it is all organised.

What can your ECS division members expect from the Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics Division in the 2018 General Assembly?

For the 2018 General Assembly we are planning an ECS dinner again (check your emails or our Facebook page for more information and updates). We will have representatives at the ECS Corner at the ice-breaker on Sunday evening, and I hope EMRP ECS will stop by to say ‘Hi!’ In addition to the official ‘Meet EGU’ booth with our division president, I’m planning a Meet & Greet in the ECS Lounge as well to provide another opportunity for ECS to introduce themselves, ask questions or get advice.

We are not planning any EMRP specific short courses this year but would be happy to help organise some for 2019. The short course programme at the EGU General Assembly is always great, and I highly encourage everyone to have a look at what’s offered.

Our division ECS team has four members, with one stepping up as the next EMRP division ECS representative. If anyone is interested in helping out but not sure about becoming a representative, consider joining your division ECS team. They will be grateful for the support.

What is your vision for the EGU ECS community and what do you hope to achieve as Union-level ECS representative in the time you hold the position?

I would like to see the ECS community more involved in organising sessions and shaping what the General Assembly looks like. We are running a short course on this year to accomplish these goals. I would also like to develop ways in which the ECS community could acknowledge established scientists that support ECS activities, but I would be interested in discussing just how to achieve this with the division ECS representatives.

How can those wanting to, get involved with the EGU?

There are lots of ways to get involved!

  1. See if your division is looking for an ECS representative and apply
  2. If the ECS representative position is taken, or if you’d rather not take on that role, ask if you can join the ECS team
  3. Fill in the surveys – this feedback is vital for us
  4. Attend the General Assembly ECS Forum (Thursday, 12 April at 12:15) and provide feedback
  5. Talk to your division ECS representative – either at one of the ECS events (ice-breaker, Networking & Careers Reception, Meet EGU) or you can shoot them an email

 

Interview by Olivia Trani, EGU Communications Officer

 

* The EGU communications officer is the ECS contact point at the EGU office.

EGU 2018: How to make the most of your time at the General Assembly without breaking the bank

EGU 2018: How to make the most of your time at the General Assembly without breaking the bank

Attending a conference is not cheap, even if you’ve been lucky enough to secure some funds to help with travel, accommodation and/or registration costs. However, with a little insider knowledge from those who’ve attended the General Assembly many times before, it is possible to have a (scientifically) rewarding week in Vienna, without breaking the bank.

Before you get there

A sure way to save a few cents (or pennies) is to book your accommodation and travel early. With over 14,000 participants at the conference last year, the race for places to stay and transport to get to Vienna is fierce. Booking early will not only mean you have more choice of places to stay and times to travel, but will ensure you get the most competitive prices too.

For those travelling by plane to the conference, a top tip is to look for flights to Bratislava. The Slovakian capital is only 80km away from Vienna and well connected via bus, train and even boat! Bratislava airport is served by a good selection of low cost airlines and it’s often cheaper to fly there than directly to Vienna. A bus ticket between the two cities can cost as little as one Euro (if booked well in advance) with the average for a return train trip being around 14 euro. If that’s not enough to persuade you, it’s worth factoring in a little time to discover the city. It’s a warren of quaint little streets, an imposing castle and good, affordable beer and food.

If you’d rather head straight to Vienna, booking your arrival and departure for the day(s) before and after the conference can result in considerable savings. And, if you’re ok with longer journeys, you might consider the train or the bus, which are often more affordable too.

Somewhere to stay

Sharing accommodation is an easy way to keep costs down. If you are travelling with colleagues consider sharing with them. If you are traveling on your own, or unable to share with colleagues, reach out to contacts you made in the past, be it a former undergrad friend, or someone you met during a workshop. They may not be in your immediate field anymore, but it might offer added bonuses like the option to reconnect and forge new links.

Hotels can be expensive. Hostels offer an affordable alternative and are bound to be packed with fellow EGU goers. Alternatively, look for beds, rooms and/or apartments via Couchsurfing, AirBnB or similar services.

A week of eating out can take its toll, both on the purse strings and on the waistline! Opt for accommodation options which have kitchenettes or full kitchens. You’ll be able to prepare some meals at your home from home, saving a little cash. Plus, you might even have enough space to entertain old friends and potential new collaborators!

Exploring Vienna

If you need a breather from all the science (and the ECS Lounge isn’t enough), or you have a few days before or after the conference to discover the Austrian capital, keep in mind that the city’s public transport is excellent. Staying outside of the city centre guarantees cheaper accommodation prices, but staying along the U1 underground (ubahn) line ensure quick and easy access to all the main tourist spots and the conference centre to boot!

Maria Theresien Platz, Vienna (source: Wikimedia)

If you’d rather opt for a more energetic option, then the city’s bike rental scheme might be just the ticket. You need to register for the scheme before you can use the bikes, but with 120 stations across the city, and a 4 hour rental costing 4 Euros, this an environmentally friendly and cheap option definitely worth considering.

Vienna has plenty to offer, from beautiful parks and gardens, through to impressive architecture and a plethora of museums (and sachertorte, of course). Visit Wien Null for a great selection of tips on how to enjoy the city to the full, without breaking the bank. The site has information about arts and culture events, free wifi spots, the best places to go for a bite to eat or a drink, as well as a selection of affordable sport options too.

You should also stay tuned to the blog on the final day of the conference. Our team of press assistants put together a blog post highlighting what’s on in Vienna over the weekend. So if you plan to extend your trip to after the conference, you’ll certainly be able to pick up some pointers. Let last year’s post serve as a starting point.

Finding funding

If your research budget won’t stretch to financing a trip to the General Assembly, don’t despair, there are a number of options you can consider. Though it might be a little late to apply for these for the upcoming conference, keep them in mind for the 2018 edition instead.

Submit your abstract to the conference between October and December and you can apply for financial support to travel to the General Assembly (from the EGU). Grants are competitive, but that doesn’t mean one shouldn’t try- if you want to apply, make sure you follow the criteria carefully, as the evaluation is based on how well you satisfy them. You can also consider participating in the EGU’s OSPP Awards, Imaggeo Photo Contest and Communicate your Science Video Competition (the video contest is not running in 2018). Not only will it give your CV a boost if you win, it’ll ensure free registration to the following year’s conference.

Many institutions also offer travel support, especially if you are presenting. Seek advice from your advisor and/or the graduate school (if your institute has one) to learn more about what funds are available. Also, find out if your institute/university is a member of Research Professional, which includes a database of all funding options available, no matter how small, including travel grants.

Similarly, there might be schemes available at the national level, be it from funding bodies or directly from the government. They often fall under the ‘short research stay’ category.

Learned societies, e.g. Institute for Civil Engineering, Institution of Engineering & Technology, often have pots of money set aside to support travel to conferences. They sometimes require you to have been a member for a set amount of time before you can apply for support, but there are many benefits to joining, so it’s a worthy investment.

For more tips and tricks, particularly if you’ve never been to the conference before, don’t forget to check our First Timer’s Guide. While we hope this post goes some way toward making the conference an affordable experience, it is by no means comprehensive.Help us make it better by sharing your suggestions on how to make the most of the General Assembly and Vienna, we’d love to hear from you. Add them in the comments section below and we’ll include them in a similar post in 2019.

By Laura Roberts Artal, former EGU Communications Officer, & the EGU’s Early Career Scientist Representatives.

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 08 to 13 April.

Get involved: become an early career scientist representative

Get involved: become an early career scientist representative

Early career scientists (ECS) make up a significant proportion of the EGU membership and it’s important to us that your voices get heard. To make sure that happens, each division appoints an early career scientists representative: the vital link between the Union and the ECS membership.

After tenure of two or four years, a few of the current ECS Representatives are stepping down from their post at the upcoming General Assembly. That means a handful of divisions are on the hunt for new representatives:

If you are looking for an opportunity to become more involved with the Union, here is your chance! Read on to discover what it takes to be an early career scientists representative.

What is involved?

The ECS representatives gather feedback from students and early career researchers, so that we can take action to improve our early career scientists activities at the EGU General Assembly and maintain our support for early career scientists throughout the year.

ECS Representatives meet virtually (roughly) every quarter and in person at the General Assembly in April. During the meetings issues such as future initiatives, how to get more of the ECS membership involved with the Union and how ECS activities can be improved, are discussed. The representatives are also heavily involved in the running of ECS-specific activities at the General Assembly, such as the icebreaker, ECS Forum and the ECS Lounge.

Within each scientific division, representatives can also take on a variety of tasks, according to their areas of expertise and interest. These can include (but aren’t limited to): organising events for early career scientists at our annual General Assembly, outreach to early career scientists and the wider public through social media or a division blog and much more.

To get more of a feel for what is involved, read this blog post by the outgoing Geodesy Division ECS representative, Roelof Rietbroek, who gives an insight into his experiences while in the role.

As well as giving you the platform to interact with a large network of researchers in your field, being an early career scientists representative is a great opportunity to build on your communications skills, boost your CV and influence the activities of Europe’s largest geoscientific association.

If you think you’ve got what it takes to be the next early career scientists representative for your division, or have any questions about getting involved in the Union, please contact the EGU Communications Officer at networking@egu.eu.

Application deadlines vary from divisions to division, but new representatives will be appointed before or during the upcoming General Assembly in Vienna (08-13 April). We recommend you get in touch with us ASAP if you are interested in applying for any of the vacancies. You can also keep in touch with all ECS-specific news from your division by signing up to the mailing list.  For more details about how ECS representatives are appointed and the internal structure of individual divisions take a look at the website.

EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.