GeoLog

climate change adaptation

How a Spanish newspaper experiment is improving public understanding of climate change

How a Spanish newspaper experiment is improving public understanding of climate change

Climate change is not a new phenomenon. Nor is global warming. So why do researchers report a poor public understanding of this subject around the world? According to a recently published study, 70% of the people surveyed said they were concerned about rising global temperatures but had little knowledge about the climate crisis. When asked how much they knew about the origin and effects of global ...[Read More]

Spring, Summer, Winter…Haze?

Spring, Summer, Winter…Haze?

Around the world, societies have many different ways to define the seasons, but for most people a season is identified by a set of culturally specified events, such as the arrival of migratory birds, certain anticipated weather patterns, or a range of expected temperatures. Over recent years many studies have examined the various ways that anthropogenic climate change has affected the way that our ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: A drift of sea-snail shells

Imaggeo On Monday: A drift of sea-snail shells

A collection of washed-up shells on a beach on the south island of New Zealand. Shore transport processes have produced a well-sorted drift of similarly sized (approx. 1-2 cm) shells and shell fragments. The main species represented are the common turret shell (Maoricolpus roseus) and wheel shell (Zethalia zelandica), both sea snails endemic to New Zealand.   Description by Pontus Lurcock, af ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Studying shell morphodynamics to improve climate models

Imaggeo On Monday: Studying shell morphodynamics to improve climate models

Profile of a specimen of Arctica islandica, one of the longest lived marine bivalves known, undergoing a 3D scan. Their longevity is exploited for reconstruction of climate patterns in the North Atlantic. However, mathematical models of their morphodynamics are necessary to account for bias induced by their asymmetric growth (“morphodynamics” is the study of how an organisms’ gro ...[Read More]