GeoLog

Tectonics and Structural Geology

Conversations on a century of geoscience in Europe: Part 2

Conversations on a century of geoscience in Europe: Part 2

When you think about the last century of geoscience, what comes to mind? Perhaps Alfred Wegener’s theory of continental drift? Or Inge Lehmann’s discovery of Earth’s solid inner core?

Over the last 100 years, geoscientists have made incredible contributions to our understanding of the Earth, the solar system, and beyond. The science community has explored uncharted territory, challenged previously held conceptions, provided vital information to policymakers, worked to address societal challenges, and put forth paths for sustainability. Through the years, researchers have also worked to promote diversity, inclusion, transparency, and accessibility in the geosciences. Many Europe-based scientists have been at the forefront of these advances.

Inspired by the centennials of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), which were both founded in 1919, we would like to highlight Europe’s role in shaping the geosciences and the great achievements of European geoscientists within the last century.

In this series of interviews, scientists across different disciplines and scientific fields reflect on the last 100 years of Earth, space and planetary sciences in Europe and share their perspectives on the future:


Karsten Gohl: Head of Geophysics Section at the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research

One of the broadest achievements in the geosciences in the last century is the transformation from individual discipline-oriented foci to an understanding of the interacting components of the entire Earth system in its complexity.

 

 

 

Read interview →

 

Anny Cazenave: Director for Earth Sciences at the International Space Science Institute in Switzerland, and emeritus scientist at the Laboratoire d’Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales (LEGOS)

Current research in Earth sciences needs to account for the impacts of human activities on the Earth System… as well as for the impacts of natural systems on human societies.

 

Read interview →

 

Mioara Mandea: Programme Manager for the Solid Earth Observation / Directorate of Innovation, Applications and Science at the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (French Space Agency)

A large number of European scientists has influenced my work over the last decades, and I would like to thank each and every one for support and guidance.

 

 

 

Read interview →

Judith A. McKenzie: Professor em. of Earth System Sciences in the Geological Institute, Department of Earth Sciences at the ETH Zurich

Meeting these challenges from a geologic prospective will be essential for the survival of the quality of life that we have come to expect in Europe during the last century.

 

Read interview →

Interviews by Olivia Trani, EGU Communications Officer

 

You can find more of our interviews on a century of geoscience in Europe here:

Part 1

 

Imaggeo on Mondays: The salt mine carving into the Carpathians

Imaggeo on Mondays: The salt mine carving into the Carpathians

The image gives us a glimpse into the Slănic Salt Mine in central Romania, about 100 kilometres north of the capital city Bucharest. The region was actively mined for almost 30 years, from 1943 to 1970.

The Slănic Salt Mine is the largest salt mine in Europe, and the facility consists of 14 large chambers, each more than 50 metres high. The cavities of the mine, more than 200 metres deep, carve into the Southern Carpathian Mountains, offering a unique large-scale view into how the layers of rock beneath the Earth’s surface bend and fold. The structures featured in this image were stretched out over time as the Earth’s tectonic plates shifted, highlighting just how fluid our planet can be.

Compared to other rocks, the rock salts in this mine can change form and flow without much pressure and at relatively shallow depths. “This flow is however very slow, so that man-made cavities in salt mines deform very slowly and remain open for decades,” notes Janos Urai, a professor of structural geology, tectonics and geomechanics at RWTH Aachen University in Germany who snapped this image while visiting the mine in 2017. “We study this slow flow of salt in nature, to be able to improve predictions of the long-term evolution of nuclear waste repositories and abandoned salt caverns.

The mine is no longer used for resource extraction, but is now an active tourist destination (there are even playgrounds, pool tables and other recreational features).

By Olivia Trani, EGU Communications Officer

You can learn more about salt tectonics on the Tectonics and Structural Geology blog here:  Minds over Methods: Reconstruction of salt tectonic features

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Foggy Bandon beach, Oregon

Imaggeo on Mondays: Foggy Bandon beach, Oregon

This picture was taken at Bandon beach, Oregon. Bandon is well-known for its memorable seascape of stacks of all shapes and sizes. These rock formations are known to geologists as ‘knockers’ and carry nicknames like ‘the Wizards hat’. They date from the Jurassic period – about 200 to 145 million years ago – and are what remains from the great mélange during tectonic subduction processes when different types of rock are exposed to the surface, and the softer sandstone and mudstone are eroded away.

Fog does roll in occasionally during summer because if the valley is baking in 30°C heat or higher, the weather systems tend to suck ocean air and create fog on the beaches. Usually the fog disappears when you go inland for a couple of hundred meters and temperature rises as well.

Description by Frederik Tack, as it first appeared on imaggeo.egu.eu.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Winners of the EGU Best Blog Posts of 2018 Competition

Winners of the EGU Best Blog Posts of 2018 Competition

There is no doubt that 2018 was packed full of exciting, insightful and informative blog posts. An impressive 382 posts were published across the EGU’s official blog, GeoLog, as well as the network and division blogs!

In December, to celebrate the excellent display of science writing across the network and division blogs, we launched the EGU Blogs competition. From a list of posts selected by our blog editors, we invited you, the EGU Blogs readers, to vote for your favourite post of 2018. We also invited EGU division blog editors and office staff to take part in a panel vote. After more than two weeks of voting, the winners are finally in!

Without further ado, we’d like to extend a big congratulations to the Geodynamics (GD) Division Blog, winner of the public vote, and the Geology for Global Development (GfGD) Blog, winner of the panel vote!

The GD division blog was crowned winner of this year’s public vote for their post on the Global Young Scientists Summit (GYSS) in Singapore! Follow blog contributor Luca Dal Zilio’s experience attending this gathering of over 250 PhD and postdoctoral fellows!

The GfGD blog snagged first place in the panel vote with their post: The Case Against Fieldwork – How can we internalise the carbon cost of fieldwork, as scientists who investigate the earth system? Read blog contributor Robert Emberson’s analysis and personal experience with the carbon footprint of working in the field!

All the posts entered into the competition are worthy of a read too, so head over to the poll and click on the post titles to learn about a variety of topics: from social media responses to geomagnetic activity, to exploring what artificial intelligence can do for climate science and watching socio-hydrology on Broadway.

If the start of a new year, with its inevitable resolutions, along with the range and breadth of posts across the EGU Blogs have inspired you to try your hand at a little science writing then remember all the EGU Blogs welcome (and encourage!) guest posts. Indeed, it is the variety of guest posts, in addition to regular features, which makes the blogs a great read! If you would like to contribute to any of the network, division blogs or GeoLog, please send a short paragraph detailing your idea to the EGU Communications Officer, Olivia Trani at networking@egu.eu.