GeoLog

Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology

Imaggeo On Monday: A steady silent witness

Imaggeo On Monday: A steady silent witness

I took this picture during a sunny field work day in the Mara Wetland, Tanzania. The granitic inselberg appeared to me as a huge silent witness not only of siltation and inundation of the wetland but also of the human actions. Slash-and-burn is widely used to deforest lands and riparian vegetation for new crops and grazing fields along the Mara River. The induced habitat degradation is jeopardizin ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Stands of Time

Imaggeo On Monday: Stands of Time

Within the heart of the Malagasy Hauts-Plateaux, the rolling grasslands are pitted by deep incisions locally referred to as lavaka (‘hole’ in Malagasy). These mass failure features provide vast quantities of terrestrial matter to local freshwater arteries, accounting for over 80% of the annual sediment load of the Betsiboka River. The collapse of the overlying laterite exposes a comparatively nutr ...[Read More]

Congratulations to the winners of the EGU Best Blog Posts of 2021

Congratulations to the winners of the EGU Best Blog Posts of 2021

At EGU, we like to believe that a new year is more meaningful when we pause to look back at the year gone by – just a brief glimpse to appreciate all our good work and progress! 2021 was certainly an excellent year for our blogging network at EGU. Across the EGU’s official blog, GeoLog and division blogs we had so many inspiring, thought-provoking and even entertaining posts this year. Thank you t ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: The tree that gave birth to a forest

Imaggeo On Monday: The tree that gave birth to a forest

This 10 centimetre giant is a pioneer of marine conquest. All summer, glassworts (Salicornia europaea) will be rhythmically swept by the tide, gradually trapping seaborne sediment on the shores of Aberlady Bay in Scotland. The resulting elevation of the mudflat marks the start of a race of growth against waves, currents and sea level rise, eventually leading to the development of a salt marsh. How ...[Read More]