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Presenting at the General Assembly 2019: A quick ‘how to’ from the EGU

Presenting at the General Assembly 2019: A quick ‘how to’ from the EGU

The schedule is out, presentation slots have been assigned and it’s time to start thinking about putting yours together. Whether you have an oral, poster or PICO slot, we have a suite of simple guidelines to get you ready for the conference!

Orals

The guidelines for oral presentations are online. All oral presentations should have the dimensions 16:9 or 4:3 and last about 12 minutes, with 3 minutes for questions. Oral presentations take place over four 105-minute time blocks. Make sure you’re in the presentation room approximately 30 minutes before your time block starts, so your presentation can be uploaded or so you can connect your laptop to the system. There will be a lecture room assistant to help you get everything ready.

Posters

Guidelines for poster presentations are also online. Importantly, the poster boards landscape and are 1978 mm by 1183 mm. Posters should be hung between 08:00 and 08:30 on the day of your scheduled poster presentation using tape available from roaming assistants. Please retrieve your poster at the end of the day (between 19:00 and 19:30). Those that are not collected will be disposed of. By the start of the General Assembly, EGU will have sent your Authors in Attendance Time – during this time, you must be present at your display.

If there is a gap in the corresponding oral session, conveners may call upon poster presenters to give a short ad hoc summary of their posters. Therefore, it might be useful to have a couple of slides (1-2) prepared in advance to help illustrate your findings.

PICOs

For the seventh year now we have a different kind of presentation: Presenting Interactive COntent (PICO). The guidelines for PICO presentations are available online. PICO sessions combine the best of oral and poster presentations. Every PICO author presents their slides in a “2 minutes madness”. After these short presentations, all attendees have enough time to watch the presentation again on interactive screens and hold discussions with the author and other attendees. These presentations are shown on wide-screens, so we recommend producing Power Point or PDF presentations with an 16:9 aspect ratio. However, you can also prepare your presentation in the classic 4:3 format. The extra space is then used for the branding of the contribution as well as the navigation. For 16:9 presentations, if navigation buttons are needed, our PICO staff on-site at the conference determines the position of the buttons together with you, so they don’t detract from your presentation. One thing to keep in mind is that, unlike in the past, PICO presentations no longer support Prezi.

For tips on how to make a PICO presentation, why not download the How to make a PICO guide. For a first-hand account of what it’s like to take part in a PICO session, take a look at this post by early career scientists in the Seismology Division too.

Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

If you are presenting a poster or PICO at the upcoming General Assembly you can have your presentation considered for an OSPP Award. Check out one of our earlier blog posts to learn more on how to register yourself for the award, as well as a watch our interview with OSPP judges explaining what they look for in a winning poster.

Social media guidelines

The EGU encourages an open dialogue on social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and blogging platforms during the General Assembly. The default assumption is to allow open discussion of General Assembly oral, PICO, and poster presentations on social media. However, you can request that the contents of your presentation are not disseminated on social media. The icons below may be downloaded from the EGU General Assembly website to include on slides or posters to clearly express if you do or do not want your results posted on any social media networks or blogs.

So that conference participants can embrace social media while at the same time remaining respectful of presenting authors’ work and protecting their research output, we’ve put together some social media guidelines, which you can find on the EGU 2019 website.

Time Blocks

Timetabling at the General Assembly is organised into the following time blocks:

  • TB1 08:30–10:15
  • TB2 10:45–12:30
  • TB3 14:00–15:45
  • TB4 16:15–18:00
  • TB5: 18:00-19:00

There is free tea and coffee available in the poster halls in the breaks between TB1 & TB2 and TB3 & TB4. TB5 5 offers refreshments, and is dedicated to networking and additional poster viewing.

No-shows

If you already know that your abstract will not be presented, you are kindly requested to withdraw your corresponding abstract as soon as possible.

EGU 2019: Connect at the Networking & Early Career Scientists’ Zone

EGU 2019: Connect at the Networking & Early Career Scientists’ Zone

The EGU General Assembly, the largest geoscience conference in Europe, attracts more than 15,000 participants every year. While there are countless opportunities throughout the week to meet new people and reconnect with colleagues, the convention centre can be overwhelming, especially for early career scientists (ECS) and first-time attendees.

The Networking & Early Career Scientists’ Zone (formerly called the Early Career Scientists Lounge) on the Red Level of the conference centre is the perfect place to catch up with your peers and make new connections in a more relaxed setting.

Early Career Scientists checking the notice boards at the EGU General Assembly 2018 (Credit: Stephanie Zihms)

Early career scientists across all fields are encouraged to meet there to grab a coffee, hold informal discussions and perhaps even find opportunities for collaborations. Additionally, we hope that mentors and mentees participating in the General Assembly Mentoring Programme, as well as other meeting participants interested in networking, will meet here.

Stay up-to-date

Be sure to check out the zone’s community notice boards, where you can find information on various topics, like cultural activities in Vienna and division social events, taking place during the week of the conference. Your feedback to the ECS representatives is very welcome and can be posted on the suggestion boards too. You can also post your own flyers here to highlight sessions and events taking place throughout the week.

Attend and organise pop-up events

The Networking & ECS Zone also hosts a series of pop-up style events, from using poetry to communicate your science to giving research elevator pitches. Be sure to check out the notice boards to find more info on what drop-in sessions are scheduled for the week.

Interested in holding your own drop-in session? Participants are encouraged to organise pop-up events in the zone as well! A whiteboard, flipchart, and 42” screen with a notebook attached will be available in the main room for attendees to give ad-hoc presentations, plus two side room ‘pop-up spots’ can be used to hold informal sessions.

If you’d like to add a drop-in session to our schedule, you can contact the EGU communications officer with the pop-up event title, date, and time by 18 March. If you’d rather hold an impromptu session, such as a follow-up event to an over-subscribed short course, never fear! During the conference you can plan and host informal events on the spot; a sign-up sheet on the zone’s notice boards will be available for advertising drop-in sessions.

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 7 to 12 April. Check out the full session programme on the General Assembly website and follow the Assembly’s online conversation on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

Making a poster or PICO presentation: top tips from the Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award judges

Making a poster or PICO presentation: top tips from the Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award judges

Every year at the General Assembly hundreds of students present their research at the conference with a lot of time and effort going into preparing these presentations. With the aim to further improve the overall quality of poster presentations and more importantly, to encourage early career scientists to present their work in the form of a poster, the OSP Awards (as they were formerly known), were born. Since the 2016 General Assembly, PICO presentations have been included in the Outstanding Student Poster Awards, which have been renamed to Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards.

“There are a thousand posters in a hall, and they are all competing for attention,” highlights Niels Hovius of GFZ, German Research Centre for Geosciences and a former OSP Judge for the Geomorphology Division, “so, you need to stand out a little bit.”

But, how can you make sure your poster or PICO is a great presentation which achieves that?

At the 2015 General Assembly we spoke to some of the judges and past winners of the award and asked them to share their thoughts on what makes a top poster presentation.  We put their top tips together in this short video, which gives you a good idea of the key elements you ought to be thinking about when preparing your poster or PICO presentation.

If you are participating in OSPP, don’t forget to attach the OSPP label (blue SVGblue PNGyellow SVGyellow PNG) to your poster board. Alternatively, you might include the label in the poster itself. If you participate with a PICO, you are kindly asked to add the OSPP label to your PICO presentation header.

The OSP awards are presented at the level of the EGU Programme Groups which in 2015 saw an improved way of signing up for the award and also judging of the presentations. A post from the blog archives also has full details of how the presentations are evaluated and you can also find detailed information about the award on the EGU website.

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 7 to 12 April. Check out the full session programme on the General Assembly website and follow the Assembly’s online conversation on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

EGU 2019: Getting to Vienna, getting to sleep and getting to know the city

EGU 2019: Getting to Vienna, getting to sleep and getting to know the city

With the conference only a few weeks away here is a brief, and by no means comprehensive, introduction of how to get to Vienna and what to do when you’re there!

Getting here

Vienna’s International Airport is served by many of the major European airlines. If you would like to consider reaching Vienna by train or bus you’ll find more information on the General Assembly websiteSince 2018, the EGU gives General Assembly participants the opportunity to offset the carbon emissions resulting from their travel to and from Vienna by contributing to a carbon offsetting scheme when they register to the meeting. You can find more information on how to make your travel to the EGU meeting carbon neutral also on our website.

And, if you haven’t seen it already, make sure you check out the General Assembly guide, which is full of even more hints and tips on how to get to Vienna and get ready for the conference.

Getting to sleep

An abundance of accommodation options can be found on the EGU 2019 website. But if you’re not a fan of hotels, there are a variety of alternatives in Vienna. Here are a few examples!

If you’re looking for a low cost option, there are a host of hostels in Vienna, just check these sites:

And, if you’d like to feel more at home, or stay in a flat with fellow geoscientists, you can consider the apartments available in Vienna:

Getting to know Vienna

Vienna’s Prater Park. Credit: Michal Jarmoluk (distributed via pixabay.com)

The Vienna tourist board has all you need to know about sightseeing, shows, shopping, dining and other information about Vienna and you can top this information up with this list of the city’s museums.

Tourist information offices can be found in the Arrivals Hall of Vienna International Airport or at the Tourist Information Centre, which sits behind the Vienna State Opera (the Tourist Information Centre is open daily 09:00-19:00 and you can access it from the U-bahn stop Albertinaplatz/Maysedergasse). Additionally, there is another tourist information office located in the main train station, the Hauptbahnhof, also accessible on the U-bahn. It is also open Mon-Sun from 09:00-19:00.

If you’ve been before and can recommend a good spot for dinner, or something to do when you have a little down time, feel free to make suggestions in the comments!

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 7 to 12 April. Check out the full session programme, for a complete list of short courses available, on the General Assembly website.