GeoLog
Laura Roberts-Artal

Laura Roberts-Artal

Laura Roberts Artal is the Marketing Manager at PDS Ava (part of PDS Group) and Associate Director of Communications for Geology for Global Development. Laura was the Communications Officer at the European Geosciences Union from the summer of 2014 to the end of 2017. Laura is a geologist by training and holds a PhD in palaeomagnetism from the University of Liverpool. She tweets at @LauRob85.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Smoking mountain top

Imaggeo on Mondays: Smoking mountain top

Japan’s northernmost, second largest and least developed island, Hokkaido, is famous for its unspoilt nature. Harsh, cold and snowy winters make way for pleasant summers, which allow tourists and locals to enjoy a variety of outdoor activities, year-round, in the island’s six protected areas.

The largest of the natural parks is Daisetsuzan: known for it’s wilderness and volcanoes. It is formed by the Daisetsuzan volcanic group, which is arranged around the Ohachidaira caldera. The highest peak of the group is Mt. Asahidake (2,291 m above sea level) and remains active. The Mt. Tokachi volcanic group, named after its highest peak Mt. Tokachi (also an active volcano), and the Ishikari Mountain Range, which includes the Mt. Shikaribetsu volcanic group near Lake Shikaribetsu and older geological strata of the Hidaka Mountain Range, make up the rest of the volcanic groups in the park.

Mt. Asahidake has not erupted since 1739, but constantly releases steam, which escapes from cracks across it’s volcanic slopes. According to Daniela Domeisen, who took the photograph we feature today:

“The fumaroles give the volcano its characteristic look and sulphuric smell.”

She goes on to describe the impressive volcanic setting:

“The mountain raises rather slowly, but with a steep and slippery peak. The descent on the opposite side is literally a secluded paradise, with the soil and the plants competing for the most beautiful patchwork of colour.”

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

 

GeoTalk: Maribel García-Ibáñez, Early Career Scientist Representative

GeoTalk: Maribel García-Ibáñez, Early Career Scientist Representative

In addition to the usual GeoTalk interviews, were we highlight the work and achievements of early career researchers, this month we’ll also introduce one of the (outgoing) Division early career scientist representatives (ECS). The representatives are responsible for ensuring that the voice of EGU ECS membership is heard. From organising short courses during the General Assembly, through to running division blogs and attending regular ECS representative meetings, their tasks in this role are varied.  Their work is entirely voluntary and they are all active members of their research community, so we’ll also be touching on their scientific work during the interview.

Today we are talking to Maribel García-Ibáñez, ECS representative for the Ocean Sciences (OS) Division. Maribel has been in post for over 18 months, but her term comes to an end at the 2018 General Assembly. If our conversation with her inspires you to get involved with EGU and its activities for early career scientists, then check out what vacancies are available.

Before we get stuck in, could you introduce yourself and tell us a little more about yourself and your career?

Hi! As you said, I am Maribel and I am the ECS representative for the OS Division. I come from Spain where I studied the degree of Marine Sciences and later I obtained a PhD in Chemical Oceanography. My research interests are water masses and ocean acidification, especially in the North Atlantic and Arctic regions. Nowadays, I am based in Norway, where I work as a Postdoc at Uni Research.

Although we touch upon it in the introduction of this post: what does your role as ECS representative involve?

Well, as you mentioned, our main role is to ensure communication between the EGU and their ECS. The way to approach it varies from one division to another. In the OS division, we try to be as active as possible in social media (you can find us on Facebook and Twitter) and we also organise some short courses during the General Assembly. I also communicate with the OS division President, Karen Heywood, to increase the ECS representation within the division. Finally, I participate in the regular Skype meetings with ECS representatives from the other divisions during which we discuss about how to increase the ECS representation in EGU.

Why did you put yourself forward for the role?

I attended the General Assembly the year before becoming an ECS representative and I loved its networking environment. However, I felt a bit lost in such a big conference and when I saw the vacancy I thought I could help other newcomers feel more comfortable and welcome.

What is your vision for the Ocean Sciences Division ECS community and what do you hope to achieve in the time you hold the position?

I think it is a diamond in the rough. I see a lot of potential in networking, but we still need a push to become a more active division in EGU. I must also say that I have already seen an improvement in this aspect during my years as ECS representative, which I hope will continue. My idea when I started as ECS representative for the OS division was to create an active group of ECS ready to push forward the division. However, it has been harder than I thought, but I am positive about the future.

What can your ECS Division members expect from the Ocean Sciences Division in the 2018 General Assembly?

We have 63 sessions and 3 co-organised short courses: “How to publish in the EGU journal Ocean Science”; “What are the key problems in Climate Science?”; and “Polar science career panel”. I encourage the ECS from the OS Division to attend the Division Meeting during the General Assembly to get to know the division activities and the current division officers. I also recommend participating in the Mentoring Programme to help newcomers to develop new connections (deadline: 31 January 2018) and active participate in the events especially designed for ECS, such as The Early Career Scientists’ Great Debate that next GA will deal with: Should early career scientists use time developing transferrable skills?; and the short course Academia is not the only route: exploring alternative career options for Earth scientists. And, please, stay tuned to the EGU-OS’s official social media (Facebook and Twitter) and the EGU’s official social media and the EGU website, in particular, the pages dedicated to ECSs, and subscribe to the mailing lists so you do not miss any future activities.

How can those wanting to, get involved with the EGU?

Simply check the online resources to get to know what is going on in EGU. All divisions have they arms open to new active members! If you are interested in getting involved in the OS Division, you can contact me via email or social media (Facebook and Twitter). You can also contact the President of Division, Karen Heywood. Also, in 2018, our division is searching for a new ECS representative. If you are interested in the position, apply as a candidate for the OS  ECS representative by contacting us through the contact points mentioned above.

Interview by Laura Roberts Artal, EGU Communications Officer

Arts and culture at EGU 2018

Arts and culture at EGU 2018

As well as a stimulating scientific programme (remember the call-for-abstracts is currently open!), the upcoming General Assembly will also feature exciting cultural activities. Read on for a whistle-stop tour of what to expect, and of course, stay tuned to our social media channels, and follow the official hashtag (#EGU18) for more information on the run-up to the conference.

A poet in residence

You might ask: what on Earth does poetry have to do with science?

Sam Illingworth – Science Communication Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University – is a firm believer that “poetry can be a very effective tool in communicating science to a broader audience, and can even help to enhance the long-term retention of scientific content.”

Since the 2016 edition of the meeting, along with a team of collaborators, Sam has organised the ever-popular ‘Rhyme Your Research’ short course, as well as poetry clinics at the Early Career Scientist Lounge and hosted the EGU Poetry slam (which takes place at the Conveners Reception).

Sam’s efforts to inspire others to take up poetry as a means of communicating their research, as well as his back catalogue of, frankly, brilliant science poems, mean he’ll be the poet in residence at EGU 2018. In this new role, as well as the activities he’s run in the past, Sam will turn some of the research presented during the conference into science poems.

“I am looking forward to the GA, because it is the scientific highlight of every year for me, and because this year I will be able to write even more poetry about the science that I love!” says Sam.

Read on for a taste of what to expect from Sam at EGU 2018:

What is a geoscientist?

We listen to the sounds of hidden lines,

And use them to look back to distant times.

We weigh the Earth to every grain of sand,

And use them to define where we now stand.

We model waves across the air and sea,

And use them to infer what might then be.

We search for answers to how we exist,

That is what makes a geoscientist.

 

Cartoons, cartoons everywhere

Words aren’t for everyone; some, have a much more visual memory, and, if you throw in a little humour in the mix too, then understanding complex science can become so much easier! That is precisely what Matthew Partridge (aka. ErrantScience) is an expert at.

At EGU 2017, Matthew set himself the challenge of keeping a daily diary of his time at the conference. As if that weren’t a tall enough order, the posts featured not only a witty take on his time in Vienna, but also cartoons!

In 2018 we’ve invited Matthew back, but this time, not to document his own conference experience, but rather to bring some of the science presented in the poster halls and presentation rooms to life.

The art (and science) of sound

When conducting research, Earth scientists rely most on what they see and can touch in the environment around them. Less often, sound might come into play too. But what if it could play a bigger part?

Antonio Menghini, a geophysicitst and Stefano Pontani, founders of EMusic (ElectroMagnetic Music) have taken that thought one step further. What if sound could not only play a part in research but turn complex, difficult to grasp electromagnetic data, into beautiful music which brings the science closer to all, not just researchers? What if we could capture the sound of Earth?

Well, at EGU 2018 you’ll be able to find out! Antonio and Stefano are due to perform “Sounds from the Geology of Italy”, during which they’ll play EMusic drawn from electromagnetic data collected in 4 beautiful scenarios: the Phlegrean Fields, Venice Lagoon, Selinunte Temple and Castelluccio Plain. Stefano will be on guitar and loops, while Riccardo Marini will focus on electronics and Marco Guidolotti will play the saxophone.

It promises to be a musical bonanza – absolutely not to be missed!

This is an excerpt of an EMusic show performed in an Ancient Roman Theater the last summer, with a similar musical format:.

Arts and culture in the scientific programme

As well as these Union-wide initiatives, the proposed conference programme of is packed with sessions and short courses which explore the relationship between art and science. If this is a topic which you feel passionately about, or would like to contribute more to, consider submitting an abstract to these sessions or attend the workshops:

·       EOS8: Scientists, artists and the Earth: co-operating for a better planet sustainability

·       EOS9: A pilot-platform for performing your Earth&Art work

·       SC2.5: How to cartoon science

·       While not strictly art, this session seeks contributions on how make large data sets visually appealing, ESSI4.1: State of the Art in Earth Science Data Visualization

This list is not comprehensive, please explore the programme for other similar sessions.

EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

EGU 2018: Registration open

EGU 2018: Registration open

The EGU General Assembly brings together geoscientists from all over the world to one meeting that covers all disciplines of the Earth, planetary and space sciences. The conference is taking place in Vienna on 8–13 April 2018, providing an opportunity for both established scientists and early career researchers to present their work and discuss their ideas with experts in all fields of the geosciences.

Registration and abstract submission

Early registration for the conference is open until 1 March 2018. You can register online on the Registration section of the General Assembly website.

Note that EGU members benefit from reduced member rates. If you register to attend the conference before 1 March 2018 and you are an EGU member, your weekly ticket will cost €390. A similar early-bird discount is available to non-members, but weekly ticket costs are significantly higher: €530.  A similar pricing structure is in place for PhD students who are EGU members.

Those registering after 1 March will no longer enjoy early registration discounts, regardless of their membership and career status. To become a member, or renew your EGU membership, go to www.egu.eu/membership/.

You can get a feel for the great geoscience that will be discussed at the meeting by browsing through the EGU 2018 sessions. Clicking on ‘please select’ allows you to search for sessions by Programme Group. You’ll then be able to view the sessions in more detail and submit an abstract to its relevant session.

The deadline for abstract submission is 10 January 2017, 13:00 CET. The full meeting programme will be made available on 20 February 2018.

Submit your townhall and splinter meeting requests

Also available on the conference website are the request forms for townhall and splinter meetings.

Townhall meetings are meetings open to all conference participants. At townhall meetings, new initiatives or decisions are announced to a larger audience, followed by an open discussion on the matter raised. If you’d like to organise a townhall, be sure to submit your request before 18 January 2018.

During the conference, side meetings on non-commercial matters organized by participants can be reserved for two successive time blocks free of charge in the rooms mentioned below. Commercial meetings are subject to a charge dependent on the meeting size – for details check the website.

More details about the short courses, splinter and townhall meetings at the conference will be given in an upcoming blog post.

For more information about the General Assembly, please see the EGU 2018 website.

EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.