Geology for Global Development

GfGD News

Photo Highlights – 5th GfGD Annual Conference

Kindly hosted and supported by the Geological Society of London, our 5th Annual Conference had the theme “Cities – Opportunities and Challenges for Sustainable Development”. The event gathered more than 130 participants, with diverse speakers from the public and private sectors, academia and civil society! Find resources online . Thanks to Jesse Zondervan (Plymouth University) for taking and editing photographs.

GfGD Annual Conference 2017 – Cities and Sustainable Development

GfGD 3rd Annual Conference (Geology and the Global Goals for Sustainable Development)

Since the Sustainable Development Goals were agreed in 2015, Geology for Global Development has been at the forefront of mobilising and equipping the geoscience community to engage and make a positive contribution.

In 2015, we organised the first major gathering of geologists/Earth scientists anywhere in the world to explore our role in delivering the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Over 120 geologists came together to consider how our science and skills can help ensure the successful achievement of these 17 ambitious goals, aiming to end global poverty, fight injustice and inequality, and ensure environmental sustainability by 2030. Our 2016 conference had the themes of ‘best practice’ and ‘personal engagement’. We explored the skills and topical understanding required to deliver high quality, high-impact development projects, and practical projects and opportunities to get involved and help achieve the SDGs.

This Friday we hold our 5th Annual Conference, turning our attention to cities and considering the role of geoscience in realising the SDGs in urban environments. There are unique opportunities presented by cities, as well as significant challenges associated with urban development.

Over the past 12 months I have had the opportunity to visit culturally and economically significant cities across three continents, with notable visits to cities in eastern and southern Africa – Nairobi, Kampala, Lusaka and Dar es Salaam. These cities are growing, rapidly. Dar es Salaam is the third fastest growing city in Africa, with some projections suggesting that it will be one of the 20 largest cities (by population) by the middle of this century.

The United Nations note that:

“Cities are hubs for ideas, commerce, culture, science, productivity, social development and much more.
At their best, cities have enabled people to advance socially and economically.”

But what do cities ‘at their best’ look like? How does (or perhaps, how should) geoscience inform urban planning, development, and resilience? What are the primary successes and mistakes of past and current urban development that could support Dar es Salaam and other future megacities? These are some of the questions we’ll be exploring at our conference, with the aim of catalysing ideas for urban geoscience research, innovation and training tools.

Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) – September 2017

The geoscience community have a significant responsibility and exciting opportunity to work with other disciplines to promote sustainable cities and strong stewardship of the Earth. Our conference will bring together ambassadors from multiple diverse disciplines and sectors, together with 140+ geoscientists, to explore these themes and better understand our role in urban development that strengthens society and best serves future generations.

Limited tickets remain (available here), and you can follow the conference on Twitter using #GfGDConf.

New Paper: Geoscience Engagement in Global Development Frameworks

We have recently contributed to a new open access article included in a special volume coordinated by the International Association for Promoting Geoethics (IAPG)This article, synthesises the role of geoscientists in the delivery of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the Paris Climate Change Agreement, and discusses ways in which we can increase our engagement in the promotion, implementation and monitoring of these key global frameworks.

Abstract: During 2015, the international community agreed three socio-environmental global development frameworks, the: (i) Sustainable Development Goals; (ii) Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and (iii) Paris Agreement on Climate Change. Each corresponds to important interactions between environmental processes and society. Here we synthesise the role of geoscientists in the delivery of each framework, and explore the meaning of and justification for increased geoscience engagement (active participation). We first demonstrate that geoscience is fundamental to successfully achieving the objectives of each framework. We characterise four types of geoscience engagement (framework design, promotion, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation), with examples within the scope of the geoscience community. In the context of this characterisation, we discuss: (i) our ethical responsibility to engage with these frameworks, noting the emphasis on societal cooperation within the Cape Town Statement on Geoethics; and (ii) the need for increased and higher quality engagement, including an improved understanding of the science-policy-practice interface. Facilitating increased engagement is necessary if we are to maximise geoscience’s positive impact on global development.

PDF (open access) here: http://www.annalsofgeophysics.eu/index.php/annals/article/view/7460/ 

GfGD 5th Annual Conference: Cities, Geoscience, and Sustainable Development

Registration for the 5th GfGD Annual Conference is now open! Aimed at geoscientists at all stages of their career, the theme this year is “Cities: Opportunities and Challenges for Sustainable Development”. Urbanisation is a development mega-trend, associated with both major challenges but also significant opportunities for delivering the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals.

“More than half of the world’s population now live in urban areas. By 2050, that figure will have risen to 6.5 billion people – two-thirds of all humanity. Sustainable development cannot be achieved without significantly transforming the way we build and manage our urban spaces.” (United Nations Development Programme – UNDP)

This conference will explore themes such as the sustainable resourcing of cities and resilient cities, with a particular focus on the Global South. We’ll be releasing a programme and announcing speaker details later this summer.

When: Friday 3 November
Where: Geological Society of London

Get your ticket here >> https://gfgd-cities.eventbrite.co.uk