GeoLog

Soil Sciences

Imaggeo on Mondays: Life between the arid mountains of Gansu, China

Imaggeo on Mondays: Life between the arid mountains of Gansu, China

Even within Earth’s more arid environments, you can find life!

This featured photo was taken near the Lanzhou Zhongchuan Airport, about 50 km away from Lanzhou city, the capital of Gansu province in Western China. The area lies in a region between the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and the Loess Plateau, with an elevation ranging from 1,500 m to 2,200 m. The landscape is dominated by a network of ridges and valleys; the Loess Plateau in particular is known for its highly erodible soil.

The region is a typical temperate or semi-arid area receiving just 260-290 mm of precipitation annually with a potential evapotranspiration of about 1660 mm each year, according to the Gaolan and Yongdeng National Meteorological Stations. However, even in these dry conditions, you can still find pockets of agricultural plots nestled between the winding mountain ridges. Farmers in this region commonly rely on an agricultural method called terrace farming, where crops are grown on graduated platforms, resembling wide steps. Often used in dry mountainous environments, the practice not only creates a flat surface for farming, but also reduces soil erosion and efficiently conserves water. The terraced farms in this area are mainly distributed in the valley where lands are irrigated for wheat and maize production.

By Olivia Trani, Communications Officer, and Xiaoming Wang, State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Science, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou, China

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: How erosion creates natural clay walls

Imaggeo on Mondays: How erosion creates natural clay walls

The badlands valley of Civita di Bagnoregio is a hidden natural gem in the province of Viterbo, Italy, just 100 kilometres from Rome. Pictured here is the ‘wall,’ one of the valley’s most peculiar features, where you can even find the wooden structural remains of a trail used for agricultural purposes in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The photograph was taken by Chiara Arrighi, a post-doc research assistant at the University of Florence (Italy), in May last year after climbing roughly 200 metres from the bottom of the Chiaro creek valley. Trails in this region are not well traced or maintained, so she had to find her own way up among the chestnut woods. Once at the top, the trail becomes narrow and unprotected. “The inhabitants of the area still do not exploit this natural beauty as a tourist attraction,” said Arrighi. “In fact, nobody was on the trail, and the silence [was] unreal.”

Badlands are a typical geological formation, where grains of sand, silt and clay are clumped together with sedimentary rock to form layers, which are then weathered down by wind and water. The terrain is characterised by erosive valleys with steep slopes, without vegetation, separated by thin ridges.

Due to the slope’s steep angle and the clay’s low permeability, little water is able enter the soil. Instead water quickly flows across the surface, removing surface clay and carving into the slopes as it does so.

The morphological evolution of the clay slopes can be very rapid (for example, rock falls can occur quite suddenly after heavy rainfall) and occurs as a result of several physical mechanisms, such as mud flows, solifluction (slow movement of wet soil towards the bottom of the valley) and sliding.

During the evolution of the badlands, peripheral portions of the terrain made up of volcanic deposits (tuff cliffs) rose up from the landscape, bordered by nearly vertical slopes (called scarps). Many towns have been built on these erected hilltops, such as Civita di Bagnoregio.

By Chiara Arrighi and Olivia Trani

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

GeoTalk: Severe soil erosion events and how to predict them

GeoTalk: Severe soil erosion events and how to predict them

Geotalk is a regular feature highlighting early career researchers and their work. In this interview we speak to Matthias Vanmaercke, an associate professor at the University of Liège in Belgium who studies soil erosion and land degradation across Europe and Africa. At the EGU General Assembly he received the 2018 Soil System Sciences Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award.

Thanks for talking to us today! Could you introduce yourself and tell us about your career path so far?

Hi! So I am Matthias Vanmaercke. I’m from Belgium. I’m studied physical geography at the University of Leuven in Belgium, where I also completed my PhD, which focused on the spatial patterns of soil erosion and sediment yield in Europe. After my PhD, I continued working on these topics but with a stronger emphasis on Africa. Since November 2016, I became an associate professor at the University of Liege, Department of Geography where I continue this line of research and teach several courses in geography.

At the 2018 General Assembly, you received a Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award for your contributions towards understanding soil erosion and catchment sediment export (or the amount of eroded soil material that gets effectively transported by a river system).

Could you give us a quick explanation of these processes and how they impact our environment and communities?

We have known for a long time that soil erosion and catchment sediment export pose important challenges to societies. In general, our soils provide many important ecosystem services, including food production via agriculture. However, in many cases, soil erosion threatens the long term sustainabilty of these services.

Several erosion processes, such as gully erosion, often have more direct impacts as well. These include damage to infrastructure and increased problems with flooding. Gullies can also greatly contribute to the sediment loads of rivers by directly providing sediments and also by increasing the connectivity between eroding hill slopes and the river network. These high sediment loads are in fact the off-site impacts of soil erosion and often cause problems as well, including deteriorated water quality and the sedimentation of reservoirs (contributing to lower freshwater availability in many regions).

Matthias Vanmaercke, recipient of the 2018 Soil System Sciences Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award. Credti: Matthias Vanmaercke.

What recent advances have we made in predicting these kinds of processes?

Given that we live in an increasingly globalised and rapidly changing world, there is a great need for models and tools that can predict soil erosion and sediment export as our land use and climate changes.

However, currently our ability to predict these processes, foresee their impacts and develop catchment management and land use strategies remains limited. This is particularly so at regional and continental scales and especially in Africa. For some time, we have been able to simulate processes like sheet and rill erosion fairly well. However, other processes like gully erosion, landsliding and riverbank erosion, remain much more difficult to simulate.

Nonetheless, the situation is clearly improving. For example, with respect to gully erosion, we already know the key factors and mechanisms that drive this process. The rise of new datasets and techniques helps to translate these insights into models that will likely be able to simulate these processes reasonably well. I expect that this will become feasible during the coming years.

 

What is the benefit of being able to predict these processes? What can communities do with this information?

These kinds of predictions are relevant in many ways. Overall, soil erosion is strongly driven by our land use. However, some areas are much more sensitive than others (e.g. steep slopes, very erodible soil types). Moreover, many of these different erosion processes can interact with each other. For example, in some cases gully formation can entrain landslides and vice versa.

Models that are capable of predicting these different erosion processes and interactions can strongly help us in avoiding erosion, as they provide information that is useful for planning our land use better. For instance, these models can help determine which areas are best reforested or where soil and water conservation measures are needed.

They also help with avoiding and mitigating the impacts of erosion. Many of these processes are important natural hazards (e.g. landsliding) or are strongly linked to them (e.g. floods). Models that can better predict these hazards contribute to the preparedness and resilience of societies. This is especially relevant in the light of climate change.

However, there are also impacts on the long-term. For example, many reservoirs that were constructed for irrigation, hydropower production or other purposes fill up quickly because eroded sediments that are transported by the river become deposited behind the dam. Sediment export models are essential for predicting at what rate these reservoirs may lose capacity and for designing them in the most appropriate ways.

At the Assembly you also gave a presentation on the Prevention and Mitigation of Urban Gullies Project (PREMITURG-project). Could you tell us a bit more about this initiative and its importance?

Urban mega-gullies are a growing concern in many tropical cities of the Global South. These urban gullies are typically several metres wide and deep and can reach lengths of more than one kilometre. They typically arise from a combination of intense rainfall, erosion-prone conditions, inappropriate city infrastructure and lack of urban planning and are often formed in a matter of hours due to the concentration of rainfall runoff.

Urban gully in Mbuji-Maji, Democratic Republic of Congo, September 2008. Credit: Matthias Vanmaercke

Given their nature and location in densely populated areas, they often claim casualties, cause large damage to houses and infrastructure, and impede the development of many (peri-)urban areas.  These problems directly affect the livelihood of likely millions of people in several countries, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, and Angola. Due to the rapid growth of many cities in these countries and, potentially, more intensive rainfall, this problem is likely to aggravate in the following decades.

With the ARES-PRD project PREMITURG, we aim to contribute to the prevention and mitigation of urban gullies by better studying this problem. In close collaboration with the University of Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and several other partners and institutes, we will study this underestimated geomorphic hazard across several cities in DRC. With this, we hope to provide tools that can predict which areas are the most susceptible to urban gullying so that this can be taken into account in urban planning efforts. Likewise, we hope to come up with useful recommendations on which techniques to use in order to prevent or stabilise these gullies. Finally, we also aim to better understand the societal and governance context of urban gullies, as this is crucial for their effective prevention and mitigation.

Interview by Olivia Trani, EGU Communications Officer

Imaggeo on Mondays: Namibia’s mysterious fairy circles

Imaggeo on Mondays: Namibia’s mysterious fairy circles

The grassy Namibian desert is pock-marked with millions of circular patches of bare earth just like these shown in the picture between linear dunes.

Viewed from a balloon, they make the ground look like a moonscape. Commonly known as fairy circles, the patches range from two to 12 metres across and appear in a 2000 kilometre strip that stretches from Angola to South Africa.

For many decades, the fairy circles extending uniformly over vast areas in the landscape, have puzzled laymen and scientists alike. They are subject to a lively debate and contrary hypotheses on their origin exist. Some researchers claim fairy circles were caused by termites, others propose they are the result of vegetation self-organization.

Description by Hezi Yizhaq, as it first appeared on imaggeo.egu.eu.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.