GeoLog

Soil Sciences

Winners of the EGU Best Blog Posts of 2019 Competition

Winners of the EGU Best Blog Posts of 2019 Competition

2019 was a brilliant year for our blogging network here at EGU. Across the EGU’s official blog, GeoLog, as well as the network and division blogs there were so many interesting, educational and just downright entertaining posts this year it was hard to get the blog editors to choose their favourites! Nevertheless in December, to celebrate the excellent display of science writing across the network ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: Setting trees aflame to understand the carbon balance of fires

Imaggeo on Mondays: Setting trees aflame to understand the carbon balance of fires

Smoke clears after an experimental wildfire in Australian eucalyptus forest carried out for carbon balance estimations of wildfires. We meticulously measured the carbon in all leaves, twigs, logs and bark in a forest block about 35km east of Manjimup and then they set it on fire with help from the Dept. of Parks and Wildlife, [Western Australia]. We the counted the carbon all over again including ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: Rocks weather, soil takes form

Imaggeo on Mondays: Rocks weather, soil takes form

This image depicts the soil formation, that is weathering of rock. Soil is actually formed by weathering of rock by physical, chemical and biological methods. This image depicts physical and biological weathering. Physical weathering by the action of temperature and biological weathering by the growth of some species of grass through the cracks. Image clicked from Trivandrum district of Kerala, In ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: An expedition to better understand Antarctic soils

Imaggeo on Mondays: An expedition to better understand Antarctic soils

A dramatic evening sky puts the frame to a photo taken during the Brazilian Antarctic expedition to James Ross Island in 2016. Brazilian palaeontologists and soil scientists together with German soil scientists spent over 40 days on the island to search for fossils and sample soils at various locations of the northern part of the island. The island was named after Sir James Clark Ross who led the ...[Read More]