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Gillian D'Souza

Gillian D’Souza is Media and Communications Officer at the European Geosciences Union. She oversees the Union's blog writing, press interactions and media communication. She has been a science writer on various subjects including health and the environment for over 7 years, and has an M.Sc. in Food Microbiology and Biochemistry from Mumbai, India.

GeoTalk: Philippe Courtial, Executive Secretary, reflects on 20 years of EGU!

GeoTalk: Philippe Courtial, Executive Secretary, reflects on 20 years of EGU!

Hi Philippe, could you please introduce yourself and your role for our readers? Thank you for inviting me today to provide this contribution as part of this celebration of the EGU 20th anniversary. Being fascinated by the geological features and the beauty of the minerals since my early age, I had the opportunity to study Geology. I completed my PhD at the Institut de Physique du Globe in Paris on ...[Read More]

Why hydrogen – the ‘fuel of the future’ – may not be as clean as we think

Why hydrogen – the ‘fuel of the future’ – may not be as clean as we think

Around the world, the shift to hydrogen is being considered a key strategy to decarbonize the environment, with experts even calling it the fuel of the future. Hydrogen now features in all eight of the European Commission’s net zero emissions scenarios for 2050, promising to end our dependence on fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions across industries. So it comes as no surprise that billions of e ...[Read More]

This World Biofuel Day, we look to the future with optimism

This World Biofuel Day, we look to the future with optimism

Fossil fuels have dominated the global energy market for centuries, and so most people find it surprising to learn that the first ever diesel engine (1892) was run entirely on peanut oil. German engineer Sir Rudolf Diesel who built the engine was almost prophetic when he said the use of vegetable oils for engine fuels “may seem insignificant today, but such oils may become in course of time as imp ...[Read More]

How a Spanish newspaper experiment is improving public understanding of climate change

How a Spanish newspaper experiment is improving public understanding of climate change

Climate change is not a new phenomenon. Nor is global warming. So why do researchers report a poor public understanding of this subject around the world? According to a recently published study, 70% of the people surveyed said they were concerned about rising global temperatures but had little knowledge about the climate crisis. When asked how much they knew about the origin and effects of global ...[Read More]