Geology for Global Development

Disaster Management

Climate change: to mitigate or to adapt? Managing disaster: Cyclone Fani in India, a stronger Atlantic hurricane season. That and more in Jesse Zondervan’s May 2019 #GfGDpicks #SciComm

Climate change: to mitigate or to adapt? Managing disaster: Cyclone Fani in India, a stronger Atlantic hurricane season. That and more in Jesse Zondervan’s May 2019 #GfGDpicks #SciComm

Each month, Jesse Zondervan picks his favourite posts from geoscience and development blogs/news which cover the geology for global development interest. Here’s a round-up of Jesse’s selections for the last month:

This month Cyclone Fani hit India with full force. An effective mass evacuation resulting in the loss of no human lives is an impressive disaster management feat.

As disaster was averted in India, the Guardian published a briefing on the risk of hurricanes, and whether climate change is to blame for stronger ones. Are people adapting to these changes?

Adapting, argues Marketplace show host Molly Wood in her Wired article, isn’t surrender, it is survival. Can we afford to keep attempting to mitigate climate change if we need to adapt to the effects that are already there?

Susannah Fisher and Andrew Norton agree with Wood that adaptation is often overlooked in climate campaigns. They seek to open our eyes to the adaptation experience that the global South has to offer. Let’s put these good practices to work in Europe! they say.

More this month, better ways to stem arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh, the struggle with landslides in Rio and much more.

Go ahead and look through this month’s picks!

Cyclone Fani

Cyclone Fani hits Indian coast, a million people evacuated at Thomson Reuters Foundation

INTERVIEW – Mass texting and 50,000 volunteers – how India moved a million people to safety by Annie Banerji at Thomson Reuters Foundation

Climate Adaptation

Climate Adaptation isn’t Surrender. It’s Survival by Molly Wood at Wired

Adapting to climate change in Europe: Building a systemic and urgent vision by Susannah Fisher and Andrew Norton at EIT Climate-KIC

Cambodians try out smartphones to track – and ease – climate woes by Jeffrey Barbee at Thomson Reuters Foundation

Climate now biggest driver of migration, study finds by Inga Vesper at SciDevNet

Climate Change

Are hurricanes getting stronger – and is the climate crisis to blame? By Oliver Milman at the Guardian

Lake sediment records reveal recent floods in NW England (UK) unprecedented at ScienceDaily

Climatologist Testifies to Senate Subcommittee Regarding Costs of Extreme Weather by Marie Denoia Aronsohn at State of the Planet

Disaster Risk Reduction

As climate shifts bring ‘horror movie’ floods, Rio struggles to adjust by Karla Mendes & Gregory Scruggs at Thomson Reuters Foundation

China eyes earthquake warning and prediction technology by Chen Xi at Global Times

Sharing Data Helps Puerto Ricans Rebound After Hurricane Maria at Eos Earth & Space News

Ritter Island gives new insights into the dynamics of volcanic landslides at ScienceDaily

Integrated urban flood risk management: Learning from the Japanese experience by Jolanta Kryspin-Watson & Jia Wen Hoe

Geology for Development

Study Identifies Better, Cheaper Ways to Stem Arsenic Poisoning in Bangladesh by Sarah Fecht at State of the Planet

 

Check back next month for more picks!

Follow Jesse Zondervan @JesseZondervan. Follow us @Geo_Dev & Facebook.

When are Californian earthquakes coming back with vengeance? How does climate-change-induced flooding increase inequality? Lessons from Cyclone Idai; that and more in Jesse Zondervan’s April 2019 #GfGDpicks #SciComm

Aftermath damage of the San Francisco earthquake of 1906

Each month, Jesse Zondervan picks his favourite posts from geoscience and development blogs/news which cover the geology for global development interest. Here’s a round-up of Jesse’s selections for the last month:

California seems to be overdue for earthquakes, meaning there has been a so-called earthquake ‘drought’ in the last century. Paleoseismic studies show that this hiatus is unprecedented in the last ten centuries. This means we might see a high frequency of earthquakes coming this century, while a generation who hasn’t experienced any major earthquake has passed.

Furthermore, a related article in the San Francisco Chronicle reports the US Geological Survey projects a major quake along the San Andreas Fault would cause more than 98 billion in building damage and kill up to 7,800 people. The main threat, however, is the aftermath with loss of power for at least three days and half of households without water for at least a month. The study highlights the importance of preparing the population for a quake and its aftermath.

Fortunately, this month also saw the publication of a Californian record of two million tiny earthquakes detected by Caltech scientists. This tenfold increase in the earthquake catalogue tells them more about how faults and earthquakes work and get triggered. Greg Beroza, a Stanford University seismologist says “It’s just like if a new telescope comes along and its magnification is 10 times greater”.

Can climate-change induced flooding increase inequality?

The answer seems to be yes, in fact it does. A report published by the Urban Institute in the US showed that people with poor credit scores suffered bigger drops in scores than those starting with high scores. While home-owners receive insurance pay-outs, costs to renters only increase due to increased demand after major storms.

Similarly the New York City Panel on Climate Change reports climate change is affecting everyday life in New York today, and will hit the poorest neighbourhoods in the future.

Consequently, social vulnerability should be considered when risk is modelled and funding allocated, according to RMS flood specialist Nicole Howe.

 

More perspectives this month on the aftermath and lessons from Cyclone Idai which struck southern Africa in March; the challenge of religious resignation to building resilience against natural hazards in Indonesia and what the new bill on the US National Volcano Warning System means to disaster risk reduction.

Go ahead and look through this month’s picks!

Aftermath and Response to Cyclone Idai

Cyclone Idai shows why long-term disaster resilience is so crucial by Channing Arndt and Claudia Ringler at The Conversation

Cyclone Idai is over – but its health effects will be felt for a long time by Kerrigan McCarthy and Lucille Blumberg at The Conversation

Responding To Cyclone Idai requires a more robust approach by Peter Kamalingin at Oxfam International

Earthquake risk in California

Reassessing California’s Overdue Earthquake Tab by Mary Caperton Morton at Eos Earth & Space Science News

What a major earthquake would do to San Francisco by Kimberley Veklerov at the San Francisco Chronicle

Scientists Uncover California’s Hidden Earthquakes by Shannon Hall at Scientific American

Flooding and inequality

How natural disasters can increase inequality by Gretchen Frazee at PBS

States are turning to data and interactive maps to help residents confront and manage flood risks by Shannon Cunniff at the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)

Disaster Risk Reduction: Avoiding the Inevitable by Nicola Howe at RMS

New York’s Poor and Ethnic Minority Neighbourhoods to be hit hardest by Climate Change finds NYC Panel on Climate Change by Will Bugler at Acclimatise

Climate Adaptation

7 American cities that could disappear by 2100 by Aria Bendix at Business Insider

Improving Water Resources Management with Satellite Data by Aaron Sidder at EOS Earth and Space Science News

Central America: Climate, Drought, Migration and the Border by Lieutenant Commander Oliver-Leighton Barrett at The Center for Climate & Security

Disaster Risk Reduction

Living with natural disasters – how to change Indonesia’s culture of passive resignation by Juliana Wijaya at The Conversation

Major geological survey hopes to make Indonesia more resistant to deadly tsunamis by Tim Pilgrim at Brunel University London

Hurricane Harvey provides lessons learned for flood resiliency plans at ScienceDaily

US National Volcano Warning System Gains Steam by Forrest Lewis at Eos Earth & Space Science News

External Opportunities

Register for Science and Policy Forum of 2019 Global Platform for DRR at Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR)

The Art of Resilience – Call for art helping build society’s resilience to natural hazards at GFDRR

Register to attend or watch online – Disasters: impact on child poverty and development at the Overseas Development Institute

Teaching Assistantship Applications Open for Sustainable Development Undergraduate Courses at the Earth Institute, Columbia University

Summer 2019 Teaching Assistantship Available in Environmental Science and Policy Program at the Earth Institute, Columbia University

 

Check back next month for more picks!

Follow Jesse Zondervan @JesseZondervan. Follow us @Geo_Dev & Facebook.

Climate migration needs to be predicted and planned now. Geoengineering can slow down sea level rise but could also lead to international conflicts. CO2 as a natural resource. All in Jesse Zondervan’s Mar 8 – Apr 4 2018

Climate migration needs to be predicted and planned now. Geoengineering can slow down sea level rise but could also lead to international conflicts. CO2 as a natural resource. All in Jesse Zondervan’s Mar 8  – Apr 4 2018

Each month, Jesse Zondervan picks his favourite posts from geoscience and development blogs/news which cover the geology for global development interest. Here’s a round-up of Jesse’s selections for the last month:

Imagine 140 million people across sub-Saharan Africa, south Asia and Latin America migrating in response to climate change effect, by 2050. This is what a recent World Bank report claims, by projecting current internal migration patterns due to effects, like coastal land loss and crop failure, into the future using climate models.

Climate migration will tend to be mostly internal to countries and can foster inequality as well as economic loss. Since it’s inevitable, we will need to plan for it.

We cannot prevent climate migration, but geoengineering will be a very powerful way to combat unnecessary increases in damage from climate change. With this power comes responsibility through. What will happen if one country decides to spray aerosols to decrease temperature, and inadvertently changes things for the worse for another region?

So yes, we need laws on geoengineering to prevent battles over well-meant geoengineering failures. Interestingly, I found a lot of research articles with new geoengineering proposals, so it’s really coming soon, and we need to think about regulation now.

Geoengineering can be costly. Pumping carbon dioxide from the atmosphere may prevent crop failures due to elevated temperatures, but it is still expensive. But what if we could use CO2 as a natural resource? A team of US and Canadian scientists say it will be possible to use captured CO2 for feedstock, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or renewable fuels.

This month you will find an article under the section ‘career’, which you should have a look at if you’re doing or thinking of doing a PhD and you want to consider working outside academia. You will find a lot of articles under the usual headings too, so go ahead!

Geoengineering

Once we can capture CO2 emissions, here’s what we could do with it at ScienceDaily by Sarah Fecht at State of the Planet

Preventing hurricanes using air bubbles at ScienceDaily

Geoengineering polar glaciers to slow sea-level rise at ScienceDaily

Mekong River dams could disrupt lives, environment at ScienceDaily

Climate Migration

Wave of Climate Migration Looms, but It “Doesn’t Have to Be a Crisis” by Andrea Thompson at Scientific American

Addressing Climate Migration Within Borders Helps Countries Plan, Mitigate Effects by Alex de Sherbinin at State of the Planet

Career
Having an impact as a development economist outside of a research university: Interview with Alix Zwane by David McKenzie at Development Impact

Sustainability

Structuring collaboration between municipalities and academics: testing a model for transdisciplinary sustainability projects at Lund University

To Sustain Peace, UN Should Embrace Complexity and Be UN-Heroic by Peter Coleman at State of the Planet

Climate Change Adaptation

The Rise of Cities in the Battle Against Climate Change by Allison Bridges at State of the Planet

A City’s Challenge of Dealing with Sea Level Rise at AGU’s Eos

The absence of ants: Entomologist confirms first Saharan farming 10,000 years ago at ScienceDaily

Turning cities into sponges: how Chinese ancient wisdom is taking on climate change by Brigid Delaney at The Guardian

Risk of sea-level rise: high stakes for East Asia & Pacific region countries by Susmita Dasgupta at East Asia & Pacific on the Rise

National Flood Insurance Is Underwater Because of Outdated Science by Jen Schwartz at Scientific American

Disaster Risk

Mobile phones and AI vie to update early disaster warning systems by Nick Fildes at The Financial Times

7 years after tsunami, Japanese live uneasily with seawalls by Megumi Lim at Japan Today

Volcanic risk

GeoTalk: How will large Icelandic eruptions affect us and our environment? By Olivia Trani at EGU’s GeoLog

Earthquake risk

The Wicked Problem of Earthquake Hazard in Developing Countries at AGU’s Eos

External Opportunities

Summer 2018 Internship Opportunities at the Earth Institute

Check back next month for more picks!

Follow Jesse Zondervan @JesseZondervan. Follow us @Geo_Dev& Facebook.

How do you monitor an internationally disruptive volcanic eruption? How can you communicate SDGs in an Earth Science class? Jesse Zondervan’s Nov 13 – Dec 13 2017 #GfGDpicks #SciComm

Each month, Jesse Zondervan picks his favourite posts from geoscience and development blogs/news, relevant to the work and interests of  Geology for Global Development . Here’s a round-up of Jesse’s selections for the past four weeks:

Bali’s Mount Angung started erupting ash this month, and a post on the Pacific Disaster Center’s website gives you an insight into the workings of Indonesia’s early warning and decision support system. How do you monitor an internationally disruptive volcanic eruption?

In Japan, eruptions in 2016 were preceded by large earthquakes (MW 7.0). A team of researchers used Japan’s high resolution seismic network to investigate the underground effects of earthquakes and volcanoes. How does an earthquake affect a volcano’s activity?

Next to plenty of disaster risk stories – including the simple question: why can’t we predict earthquakes? -, this month brings you a computer simulation tool to predict flood hazards on coral-reef-lined coasts and some thoughts on how to communicate SDGs in an earth science classroom.

Have a look!

Education/communication

The UN Sustainable Development Goals – what they are, why they exist by Laura Guertin at AGU’s GeoEd Trek blog

GeoTalk: How an EGU Public Engagement Grant contributed to video lessons on earthquake education by Laura Roberts-Artla at the EGU’s GeoTalk blog

Credit: Michael W. Ishak, used under CC BY-SA 4.0 license

Disaster Risk

Disaster Geology: 2017’s Most Deadly Earthquake by Dana Hunter at Scientific American

Can the rubble of history help shape today’s resilient cities? By David Sislen at Sustainable Cities

The underground effects of earthquakes and volcanoes at phys.org

Why Can’t We Predict Earthquakes? By David Bressan at Forbes

Detecting landslide precursors from space by Dave Petley at the AGU Landslide Blog

Ocean Sediments Off Pacific Coast May Feed Tsunami Danger by Kevin Krajick at State of the Planet

Life-saving technology provides alert as Bali’s Mount Agung spews ash, raises alarm at Pacific Disaster Center

Climate Change Adaptation

Scientists counter threat of flooding on coral reef coasts by Olivia Trani at AGU’s GeoSpace blog

Check back next month for more picks!

Follow Jesse Zondervan @JesseZondervan. Follow us @Geo_Dev & Facebook.