GM
Geomorphology

Geomorphology

Short video on Geomorphology – Sediment Dynamics in high-mountain Environments

Short video on Geomorphology – Sediment Dynamics in high-mountain Environments

Geomorphology is the science of processes shaping the earth surface. Especially in high-mountain environments, where the relief is steep, these processes move a great amount of material. This 10 minute video features Geomorphologists from different parts of the world, explaining what happens when glaciers retreat and expose sediments to erosion and how it affects us humans.
Furthermore it attempts to communicate a discipline’s focus to the public.

The video was produced during a summer school in the Kaunertal Valley in 2015, organized by Jan Henrik Blöthe (University of Bonn), Sabine Kraushaar (University of Vienna), David Morche (University of Halle) & Ronald Pöppl (University of Vienna).

Featuring (in order of appearance):

  • Prof. Lorenzo Borselli (Universidad Autonoma San Luís de Potosí, Mexico)
  • Dr. Andreas Zischg (University of Bern, Switzerland)
  • Prof. Ellen Wohl (Colorado State University, USA)
  • Dr. Kristen Cook (German Research Centre for Geoscience in Potzdam, Germany)
  • Dr. Joachim Götz (University of Salzburg, Austria)
  • Prof. Michael Krautblatter (Technical University of Munich, Germany)
  • Prof. Stuart Lane (University of Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Prof. Oliver Sass (University of Graz, Austria)
  • Prof. Matthias Hinderer (Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany)

 

International Workshop on Urban Geomorphological Heritage

International Workshop on Urban Geomorphological Heritage

University of Rome, 27-29 October 2016

Co-organised by the University of Rome La Sapienza (Roma 1), the University of Modena e Reggio Emilia and the University of Lausanne, under the auspices of the Working Group on Geomorphosites of International Association of Geomorphologists (IAG) and the Italian Association of Physical Geography and Geomorphology (AIGEO), this workshop aims at sharing research and methods on urban geomorphological heritage

The workshop will focus on the following topics:

  • geomorphological analysis in urban environment
  • methodologies for the assessment and mapping of urban geomorpho-sites
  • urban geotourism
  • interpretation and popularization of urban geomorphosites
  • relationships between cultural and geomorphological heritage in cities
  • conservation of geoheritage and urban growth
  • geoheritage and urban planning

PROGRAM
Thursday 27 October 2016
Intensive Course “Methods for the analysis of urban geomorphology and geomorphological heritage”

Friday 28 October 2016
Workshop “Research and methods on urban geomorphological heritage”

Saturday 29 October 2016
Fieldtrip “The geomorphological heritage of Rome”

Deadline for abstract submission (one A4 page): 31 May 2016
to Christelle Monnet, University of Lausanne

Website: www.unil.ch/igd/2016/iwugh-rome

Please click here for more information.

Looking forward to receiving your abstracts and to meeting in Roma!

Unwind your EGU stress with a geomorphology memory game

Unwind your EGU stress with a geomorphology memory game

Solmaz Mohadjer, PhD student at the University of Tübingen, found the perfect way to relax during a stressful day at EGU while refreshing your knowledge on landforms: A MEMORY card game.

– written by Solmaz Mohadjer –

Assessing rock surface hardness, dating lateral moraines, modelling future mass-balance changes of glaciers, and playing memory games with school children. Meet Dr. Stefan Winkler, a geomorphologist at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. When he is not roaming around glaciers in New Zealand, Norway and the European Alps, he can be found in school classrooms, with a box of memory cards featuring photographs of different glacial features. The game is simple yet effective, fun and sometimes challenging, even for geomorphologists. The idea for the game came to Stefan while on a geology field trip. There are many ways to unwind at the end of a long day in the field: observing and contemplating nature, yoga, beer or simply going to bed. Stefan adds ‘playing match pair memory game’ to that list.

Most of us have played memory games before, often as kids or parents of kids. Stefan’s memory game, however, is not an ordinary one. It does require you to remember where the card pairs are placed, but that is only one way to get points. To score more, you need to be able to identify the landform shown in the photograph. Is it a drumlin, a fjord, or dead ice? Once the feature is identified, you are asked to describe the landform, explain how it is formed, what it is made out of, and what it says about the glacial history of the region. The game master then judges the quality of the answers using an information card developed for each photo pair. How many points do you think you can score?

This morning at the EGU Booth, I was lucky to stop Stefan from his busy schedule and ask him a simple question: Why do you do this? ‘We need to get geomorphology back into school curriculum,’ he says. But he also emphasizes the importance of considering the end user’s needs, ‘Sadly scientists often create educational tools without involving school teachers.’ He also points out how often teachers become frustrated when they cannot access educational resources developed by scientists because of IT incompatibility, and that the most useful resources are those that are developed in collaboration with teachers.

The memory game was presented at the 2015 General Assembly, and can be ordered by emailing Stefan directly. He will also be convening a session this Thursday, so stop by if you can. If you are lucky, you might be able to unwind with a round of match pair memory game.

solmaz_photoBy Solmaz Mohadjer

Solmaz Mohadjer is the founder of the ParsQuake Project, an initiative with a mission to increase earthquake awareness, education, and preparedness in the global Persian community. She is currently a geohazard PhD researcher in at the University of Tübingen, Germany, with strong interest in science education and outreach.

 

EGU Workshop: Digital Terrain Analysis of Anthropogenic Landscapes

EGU is about to start and besides many presentation and meeting Paolo Tarolli, Tobias Heckmann and  Wolfgang Schwanghart offer a hands on workshop on Digital Terrain Analysis of Anthropogenic Landscapes (13:30–15:00 in Room L4/5). Please see below some information on the course.

Tarolli & Sofia 2016 (Geomorphology)

Tarolli & Sofia 2016 (Geomorphology)

– written by Paolo Tarolli (University of Padova) –

Humans are among the most prominent geomorphic agents, redistributing land surface, and causing drastic changes to the geomorphic organization of the landscape (e.g. intensive agriculture, urbanization, mining, roads construction), with direct consequences on land degradation and watershed response.
High-resolution topography (HRT) can be useful for engineered landscapes, where the anthropic forcing related to human activities may affect natural processes (Tarolli, 2014). HRT could play a strategic and helpful role, through the recognition of human-induced geomorphic and anthropogenic features, and the connected erosion.

In this workshop, we will explore various techniques to extract and analyze anthropogenic features from high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), and to account for the problems associated with such features in anthropogenic landscapes. Basic knowledge in Matlab® and GIS, and the availability of a laptop are an advantage but they are not a requirement to attend the workshop. Attendants at the beginning of the workshop will receive teaching materials and guidelines for the proposed methodologies.

Specifically, we will aim at:

    1. Extracting channel levees in floodplains, and terraces walls on hillslopes applying the semi-automatic techniques.
    2. Identifying terraces/road induced erosion/landslides.
    3. Automatic detection of bank erosion in agricultural drainage networks.

Upon course termination attendants will be awarded with a specific certificate of attendance signed by the EGU – GM division President and by the workshop Instructor.

References
Tarolli, P., Sofia, G. (2016). Human topographic signatures and derived geomorphic processes across landscapes. Geomorphology, 255, 140-161.
Tarolli, P. (2014). High-resolution topography for understanding Earth surface processes: opportunities and challenges. Geomorphology, 216, 295-312.

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