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WaterUnderground

Crop kites

Crop kites

Post by WaterUnderground contributor Mikhail Smilovic. Mikhail is a PhD  candidate in the Department of Civil Engineering at McGill University, in Quebec. Crops use water for photosynthesis, absorbing nutrients, and transpiration, or the plant-equivalent of sweating. A crop may experience water-stress if the soil surrounding the roots is not adequately wet, and this stress will affect the crop dif ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

GfGD endorses the ‘Cape Town Statement on Geoethics’

GfGD endorses the ‘Cape Town Statement on Geoethics’

At the start of 2017, the GfGD Board of Trustees formally endorsed the ‘Cape Town Statement on Geoethics‘, joining organisations such as Geology in the Public Interest, the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the Geological Society of America (GSA). The ‘Cape Town Statement on Geoethics‘ was prepared during the 35th International Geological Congress in Cape Town, South Af ...[Read More]

WaterUnderground

Limits to global groundwater use

Limits to global groundwater use

Post by WaterUnderground contributor Inge de Graaf. Inge is a postdoc fellow at Colorado School of Mines, in the USA. Groundwater is the world’s most important source of freshwater. It supplies 2 billion people with drinking water and is used for irrigation of the largest share of the world’s food supply. However, in many regions around the world, groundwater reserves are depleting as the re ...[Read More]

GeoSphere

Photo of the Week – Salt Coral

Photo of the Week – Salt Coral

The photo posted below is a really cool one. Interestingly, enough I have been getting into podcasts lately. They are great during my bus ride to and from work every day. One of the podcasts that I like is Neil de Grasse Tyson’s Star Talk Radio. Anyway, the other week Star Talk had a pretty good discussion about salt and the role it has played in developing human history. Check out the episo ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Guest Blog (GfGD Liverpool): Reflections on the GfGD Annual Conference 2016

Guest Blog (GfGD Liverpool): Reflections on the GfGD Annual Conference 2016

GfGD were delighted to support Clare Spink and Taryn Freeman (University of Liverpool) to attend the recent GfGD Annual Conference. As the new leaders of the GfGD Liverpool University Group they were eager to learn more about GfGD and take that back to Liverpool. On our guest blog today, they share some of those reflections… As we only recently took over organisation of GfGD Liverpool, it wa ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Mapping the Kaikoura earthquake, New Zealand

Jack Williams is a PhD Student at the University of Otago, New Zealand, where he is studying the Alpine Fault. Jack was part of a team of experts that went into the field immediately following the Kaikoura earthquake to map the surface ruptures. Here he explains what they were up to and shares some photos of the damage. The Mw 7.8 Kaikoura Earthquake was an incredibly complex event involving sever ...[Read More]

VolcanicDegassing

Flooding the Santorini Caldera

Flooding the Santorini Caldera

The flooded caldera of Santorini volcano holds many secrets, buried beneath the ash and pumice of its last great eruption. In the Late Bronze Age, about 3600 years ago, an explosive eruption several times larger that of Krakatoa, 1883, wreaked devastation across this thriving island. A great trading port, Akrotiri, was buried under metres of pumice; preserving for future generations a snapshot of ...[Read More]

GeoSphere

Photo of the Week (Approximately)

Photo of the Week (Approximately)

The truly insane photo above shows “Different generations of calcite cements in Late Miocene seep carbonates (Piedmont, Italy; cathodoluminescence microphotograph)”. It was taken by Marcello Natalicchio, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germania  – Source. This photo was taken using a cathodoluminescence microscope which is both a standalone tool or can be an adaptation to a scann ...[Read More]

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