EGU Blogs

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GeoLog

Geosciences Column: The World’s Soils are under threat

Geosciences Column: The World’s Soils are under threat

An increasing global population means that we are more dependant than ever on soils. Soils are crucial to securing our future supplies of water, food, as well as aiding adaptation to climate change and sustaining the planet’s biosphere; yet with the decrease in human labour dedicated to working the land, never have we been more out of touch with the vital importance of this natural resource. Now, ...[Read More]

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

Image of the week – The winds of summer (and surface fluxes of winter)

Image of the week – The winds of summer (and surface fluxes of winter)

Antarctica is separated from the deep Southern Ocean by a shallow continental shelf. Waters are exchanged between the deep ocean and the shallow shelf, forming the Antarctic cross-shelf circulation: Very dense waters leave the shelf as Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) that will then flow at the bottom of all oceans. Meanwhile, relatively warm water from the Southern Ocean, Modified Circumpolar Deep W ...[Read More]

SSS
Soil System Sciences

Why your scientific paper was accepted?

Why your scientific paper was accepted?

As one of the executive editors of Solid Earth, one of my main duties is to keep up the journal’s reputation and a high quality of published articles. For a manuscript to be considered as a candidate for publication, it is necessary to fall within the scope of the journal. But, in my opinion, it also needs to show “new science”: innovation in the methods or approaches, sound resu ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: an impressive testimony to the collision between Africa and Europe

Imaggeo on Mondays: an impressive testimony to the collision between Africa and Europe

The huge fold in the flank of the 2969 m high Dent de Morcles (in Waadtland Alps, Switzerland) is an impressive testimony to the collision between Africa and Europe (which began some 65 million years ago). The layers, originally deposited on the sea floor in a horizontal position, were compressed and shifted. The darker parts developed during the Tertiary period (66 million years ago). They are yo ...[Read More]

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

Image of the Week — Arctic porthole, Arctic portal

Image of the Week — Arctic porthole, Arctic portal

No need to be a superhero to momentarily escape your everyday life! For that you, can just rely on the EGU Cryosphere Blog, which cares for taking you on trips to all sorts of remote and cool places (OK, OK we have to admit that some of these places are indisputably cold :-)). The picture of this week was taken through the porthole of a boat in the middle of Isfjorden, one of the largest fjord in ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoTalk: Matt Taylor of ESA’s Rosetta Mission

GeoTalk: Matt Taylor of ESA’s Rosetta Mission

In November 2014, space exploration history was made. Millions of kilometres away, orbiting a piece of ice and rock, the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Rosetta mission sent its probe Philae to become the first spacecraft to soft-land on a comet. After the tense 7-hour wait that followed the separation from the main orbiter, a tweet confirmed that the little lander had successfully completed the fir ...[Read More]

SM
Seismology

Paper of the Month – Self-healing slip pulses in earthquake rupture

Paper of the Month – Self-healing slip pulses in earthquake rupture

The “Paper of the Month” (PoM) blog series, recently launched by the Early Careers Scientists (ECS) representatives of the Seismology Division at EGU, aims to present particularly interesting, important, or innovative research articles in all fields related to seismology. While peer-reviewed articles published in the last 12 months are the primary targets, also older “classical” papers can make it ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoPolicy: 8 ways to engage with policy makers

GeoPolicy: 8 ways to engage with policy makers

Scientific research is usually verbally communicated to policy officials or through purposefully written documents. This occurs at all levels of governance (local, national, and international). This month’s GeoPolicy post takes a look at the main methods in which scientists can assist in the policy process and describes a new method adopted by the European Commission (EC) that aims to enhance scie ...[Read More]

Earth and Space Science Informatics

Big Earth Science Data – Boon or bane?

Big Earth Science Data – Boon or bane?

We are in the era of Big Data. Big Data is a ‘hot’ topic. It is a popular term often associated with an increase in volume, variety and velocity of data. The Copernicus programme for example, the European Union’s flagship programme on monitoring the Earth’s environment using satellite and in-situ observations, anticipates a massive increase in satellite data volume. It is estimated tha ...[Read More]

PS
Planetary and Solar System Sciences

Welcome to the PS division blog!

The Solar System with planets and dwarf planets

Welcome on-board the blog of the PS division of the EGU ! You may not be familiar with the PS division and what it is about, so I’ll give you a tour. Most of the EGU divisions look towards the Earth, whether it is deep down the interior or right at the surface. Some look up to the atmosphere and the climate. Finally, there are two which look way up: PS and the Solar Terrestrial Sciences division ( ...[Read More]

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