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GeoLog

GeoEd: Social Communications

GeoEd: Social Communications

We all know that social media is an excellent way in which we can communicate our research (and indeed our rants, dreams, and favourite cat pictures) to the general public, but can we also use it to communicate our research in the classroom? From kindergarten to higher education, social media can be a fantastic learning tool, which can help to open up digital windows into the world of geosciences. ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Film review: Revolution

Film review: Revolution

It’s not every day you are asked to review a film, and since it’s a documentary that encompasses a few of EGU’s sciences (such as climate sciences, biogeosciences, and energy, resources and the environment), I couldn’t say no. I’ll start by giving it a rating, 3.5/5 stars, though I would probably give it more if I were part of the film’s main target audience. Revolution, by biologist-photographer ...[Read More]

GeoSphere

Photo of the Week # 41

I am furiously writing my Ph.D thesis at the moment. I am close to submitting. I swear! Although, everyone I know says I sound like a broken record when I say this. Anyway, while I have been doing all this writing I haven’t had much time for blogging, for which I apologize. However, in the interest of breathing some life into this dusty old thing I have decided to re-introduce the photo of t ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Sunset over the Labrador Sea

Imaggeo on Mondays: Sunset over the Labrador Sea

Ruby skies and calm waters are the backdrop for this week’s Imaggeo image – one of the ten finalist images in this year’s EGU Photo contest. “I took the picture while on a scientific cruise in West Greenland in 2013,” explains Christof Pearce, a postdoctoral researcher at Stockholm University. “We spent most of the time inside the fjord systems around the Greenland capital, Nuuk, but this specific ...[Read More]

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

From the Poles to Paris — An interview with Erlend Moster Knudsen

From the Poles to Paris — An interview with Erlend Moster Knudsen

What do polar bears and emperor penguins have to do with the Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame? Pole to Paris has the answer.   Erlend Moster Knudsen earned his PhD in climate dynamics after four years of research from the University of Bergen, Colorado State University and University of Alaska Fairbanks on Arctic sea ice and its interaction with atmospheric circulation. He took some time to answer ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoTalk: Meet Andi Rudersdorf, winner of I’m a Geoscientist 2015!

GeoTalk: Meet Andi Rudersdorf, winner of I’m a Geoscientist 2015!

Earlier this year we ran the second I’m a Geoscientist event, an online chat-based game show in which school kids vote for their favourite geoscience communicators. In this week’s GeoTalk, Laura Roberts  talks to Andi Rudersdorf, a neotectonics PhD student and winner of this year’s I’m a Geoscientist… First, for those who didn’t been following I’m a Geoscientist, can you tell us a little about you ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Studying an active volcano – in pictures

Studying an active volcano – in pictures

Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala is one of the most active volcanoes in Central America: currently erupting every 45-90 mintues, from its active lava dome Caliente, while at the same time sending a lava flow down its flanks. This makes it an ideal study object for volcanology. A group of volcanologists from the University of Liverpool, in the UK, installed a network of geophysical stations around ...[Read More]

AS
Atmospheric Sciences

What is the biggest air pollution event in the modern era?

What is the biggest air pollution event in the modern era?

It’s hard to think of the scale of the biggest air pollution event in the modern era. Immediately my mind conjures up memories of black and white photographs of the Great London Smog of 1952. Then I start thinking bigger, how about the 1.2 billion vehicles world-wide on the road churning out nitrogen dioxide every single day? Well these are a drop in the ocean compared with bigger industrial pollu ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: A voyage through scales – The Badlands National Park, South Dakota.

Imaggeo on Mondays: A voyage through scales – The Badlands National Park, South Dakota.

Layer upon layer of sand, clay and silt, cemented together over time to form the sedimentary units of the Badlands National Park in South Dakota, USA. The sediments, delivered by rivers and streams that criss-crossed the landscape, accumulated over a period of millions of years, ranging from the late Cretaceous Period (67 to 75 million years ago) throughout to the Oligocene Epoch (26 to 34 million ...[Read More]

GM
Geomorphology

Interview with Peter van der Beek

Interview with Peter van der Beek

Peter van der Beek, Professor at the University of Grenoble, France, has recently been elected the new president of the EGU GM division. In order to introduce himself to the community, Peter has kindly agreed to answer a couple of questions regarding his ideas for the future of the GM section: 1) Dear Peter, congratulations to the Division Presidency! Would you please tell us a bit about yourself ...[Read More]