GM
Geomorphology

Geomorphology

ESURF – Special Issue on 4-D reconstruction of earth surface processes

Special Issue in “Earth Surface Dynamics” (interactive, open-access and public peer reviewed journal): 4-D reconstruction of earth surface processes: multi-temporal and multi-spatial high resolution topography.

The special issue aims to demonstrate the advantages of High Resolution Topography (HiRT) to measure and understand earth surface processes at multiple temporal scales and varying spatial resolutions. The focus is on how HiRT data enhances and supports geomorphic process understanding, thereby demonstrating its capability to capture and monitor earth surface processes at unprecedented scales and, consequently, to provide new insights into how landscapes evolve in relation to forces of variable frequency and magnitude. More details are available at http://www.earth-surface-dynamics.net/special_issues/schedule.html#3

esurf_flyer

From process to signal – A Galileo conference on environmental seismology (6-9 June 2017)

Galileo flyer cover image 2

I would like to draw your attention to the EGU Galileo conference (http://www.egu.eu/meetings/galileo-conferences/):

“From Process to Signal – Advancing Environmental Seismology” 

taking place in Ohlstadt, Bavaria, Germany from 6-9 June 2017.

The workshop is orgnized by a team from the GFZ Potsdam (Jens Turowski, Michael Dietze, and Anne Schöpa), and aims to discuss the current use of seismic techniques in the study of the Earth’s surface and the processes that act upon it, a field that is collectively refered to as ‘Environmental Seismology’. In a series of keynote lectures, the state of the art will be surveyed. Presentations by attendees will address the breadth and novelties of current research. Individual break-out groups will discuss pressing scientific issues in small workshops. All scientists are invited who currently use seismic techniques to study geomorphological processes, the cryosphere, the weather, the shallow subsurface and other phenomena at or near the Earth’s surface. Also, those who are interested in the potential of seismic techniques and would like to link with the pioneering community or who wish to use seismic approaches in future are more than welcome to join.

Abstract submission is open from now until March 13, 2017. Please see the EnviroSeis website for details about the slightly different flavour of abstract handling and workshop activities.

Find out more about the event from Jens Turowski (turowski@gfz-potsdam.de), and feel free do distribute the flyer.

 

Soil is not dirt cheap: Soils, Sustainable Development Goals, and Geomorphologists.

Soil is not dirt cheap: Soils, Sustainable Development Goals, and Geomorphologists.

– written by Solmaz Mohadjer – 

Does contaminated soil make your bones go soft? What if you are told to stop growing vegetables in your garden because the soil is too toxic? What if farmers refuse to produce nutritionally valuable crops because of risk of massive floods? What would you do if you are forced to leave your farm due to fear of floods?

Surprisingly, these are the kinds of questions many farmers and families in Europe are asking themselves. These issues are as real as the tears of a farmer interviewed as part of a documentary titled RECARE (watch trailer) that was shown at GeoCinema at this year’s General Assembly. What threats soils and what one can do to prevent and remediate soil degradation are the focus of RECARE, a multidisciplinary team of different organizations brought together to tackle such vital issues.

Soil matters. Civilizations have flourished and collapsed because of fertile soil (or lack thereof). This is what Dave Montgomery emphasized in his book “Dirt” and at a well-attended and highly popular lecture at Town Hall in downtown Seattle many years ago. I was an undergraduate student back then, but his words stayed with me to this day: ‘We are slowly removing our planet’s life-giving skin.’ He explained how plow-based agriculture can bring the erosion rate of a flat place like Kansas close to a place like the Himalayas, and that with population growth, soil does not have a chance to regenerate.

It is no surprise that the 2030 agenda for sustainable development highlights soil-related issues within its 17 goals and 169 targets. Want to fight against poverty? Malnutrition? Climate change? Think soils and land. And if you are a geoscientist, you have a role to play whether you know it or not. In fact, many of the sustainable development issues are at the heart of geoscience disciplines (e.g., sustainable agriculture, water and sanitation, and climate change). These goals and the role of geoscientists in addressing them were discussed for the first time during this year’s General Assembly. If you missed this session, check out the curriculum developed by researchers at the University of Tübingen to explore these goals and to find out how you can contribute.

On the first day of the General Assembly, I had a chance to meet the EGU Division President of Geomorphology, Peter van der Beek, and to get his thoughts on the role of geomorphology in tackling sustainable development issues. Peter listed soil erosion and conservation as well as mitigation of and adaptation to climate change and hazards as topics that challenge today’s geomorphologists. Of all the 17 sustainable development goals, he highlighted climate action (goal 13) and Life on Land (goal 15) as areas where geomorphologists can make a significant contribution. “Geomorphologists also make indirect contributions to Zero Hunger (goal 2) and Clean Water and Sanitation (goal 6),” he added.

Which goal(s) is your research contributing to? Check out the Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform and/or connect with organizations (such as Geology for Global Development) that can help you make a contribution toward some of these goals.

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Solmaz Mohadjer is the founder of the ParsQuake Project, an initiative with a mission to increase earthquake awareness, education, and preparedness in the global Persian community. She is currently a geohazard PhD researcher in at the University of Tübingen, Germany, with strong interest in science education and outreach.

 

Short video on Geomorphology – Sediment Dynamics in high-mountain Environments

Short video on Geomorphology – Sediment Dynamics in high-mountain Environments

Geomorphology is the science of processes shaping the earth surface. Especially in high-mountain environments, where the relief is steep, these processes move a great amount of material. This 10 minute video features Geomorphologists from different parts of the world, explaining what happens when glaciers retreat and expose sediments to erosion and how it affects us humans.
Furthermore it attempts to communicate a discipline’s focus to the public.

The video was produced during a summer school in the Kaunertal Valley in 2015, organized by Jan Henrik Blöthe (University of Bonn), Sabine Kraushaar (University of Vienna), David Morche (University of Halle) & Ronald Pöppl (University of Vienna).

Featuring (in order of appearance):

  • Prof. Lorenzo Borselli (Universidad Autonoma San Luís de Potosí, Mexico)
  • Dr. Andreas Zischg (University of Bern, Switzerland)
  • Prof. Ellen Wohl (Colorado State University, USA)
  • Dr. Kristen Cook (German Research Centre for Geoscience in Potzdam, Germany)
  • Dr. Joachim Götz (University of Salzburg, Austria)
  • Prof. Michael Krautblatter (Technical University of Munich, Germany)
  • Prof. Stuart Lane (University of Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Prof. Oliver Sass (University of Graz, Austria)
  • Prof. Matthias Hinderer (Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany)

 

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