GeoLog

GeoLog

EGU Photo Contest 2015

If you are pre-registered for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! Winners receive a free registration to next year’s General Assembly!

The sixth annual EGU photo competition opens on 1 February. Up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Shortlisted photos will be exhibited at the conference, together with the winning moving image, which will be selected by a panel of judges. General Assembly participants can vote for their favourite photos and the winning images will be announced on the last day of the meeting.

We particularly encourage submissions representing A voyage through scales, as there will be an additional prize for the photo that best captures the theme of the conferences.  Furthermore, on the occasion of the International Year of Soils, the judges will also be awarding an honourable mention to the best image in the Soil System Sciences category submitted to the EGU Photo Contest.

If you submit your images to the photo competition, they will also be included in the EGU’s open access photo database, Imaggeo. You retain full rights of use for any photos submitted to the database as they are licensed and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons license.

You will need to register on Imaggeo so that the organisers can appropriately process your photos. For more information, please check the EGU Photo Contest page on Imaggeo.

Previous winning photographs can be seen on the 20102011, 2012,  2013 and 2014 winners’ pages.

In the meantime, get shooting!

Grand Prismatic Spring. Winner in the EGU Photo Contest 2010. (Credit: David Mencin (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Grand Prismatic Spring. Winner in the EGU Photo Contest 2010. (Credit: David Mencin, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Imaggeo on Mondays: Landslide on the Cantabrian coastline

Shimmering blue seas, rocky outcrops and lush green hills sides; this idyllic landscape is punctuated by a stark reminder that geohazards are all around us. Irene Pérez Cáceres, a PhD student at the University of Granada (Spain) explains the geomorphology behind this small scale landslide on the Asturian coastline.

Landslide on the Cantabrian Sea. Credit: Irene Pérez Cáceres (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Landslide on the Cantabrian Sea. Credit: Irene Pérez Cáceres (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

This picture was taken in May 2011 in the coast of Llanes (Asturias, Spain). I was living in Oviedo (Asturias, Spain) doing my Master in the structural geology of the Axial Zone of the Pyrenees. Thus, geomorphology and geohazards are not my specialty or area of expertise. However, the landslides are well known and studied in this region, and people from Asturias call them Argayos.

This argayo is situated in Niembru Mountain, over the San Antolín beach, constantly affected by waves and swell of tides of the Cantabrian Sea, and continuous rain typical in the region. It was defined as a rotational landslide with two fracture surfaces, possibly conjugated in wedge shape. It is approximately 50 meters high and 60 meters width at its base. The slide volume is calculated at 45000 m3. It is carved in quartzite altered by the water rain infiltration through crevices in the surface. The initial displacement was between 10 and 15 meters in the scar. Experts say this landslide is still active, moving and evolving continuously. It is an imminent risk for the swimmers, but it is very difficult to control it, due to the size and the slope, and the technical requirements to stabilize the rock. On the other side of this mountain, further landslides are evident, as a result of the building of a road.

These natural geomorphological processes are very common in the north of Spain, mainly in riverbeds, as well in other nearby beaches. The main causes are the abundant (and sometimes heavy) rainfall, the typically clay rich soils, steep slopes, building works that destabilize the slopes, and the absence of vegetation in some areas. They vary in in size and volume, and can sometimes have important material consequences and can pose a significant risk for the local inhabitants. The annual economic cost for repairing the damage caused by these processes is estimated to be 66 million of euros in this region.

Studies carried out in the Department of Geology of the University of Oviedo (Mª José Domínguez and her group), indicate that 70% of the landslides in Asturias happen when it rains over 200 mm during over a period of a minimum of three days. Research has also been carried out to try and predict when landslides might happen, examining numerous landslides over the last 20 years approximately. It seems that one conditioning factor is the exact location of new buildings, being that ancient constructions used to be in secure zones, probably because people observed more minutely to the nature, but the new ones are more vulnerable.

To conclude, detailed geological and geomorphological studies are always recommended to carry out before constructions. Thereby it is possible to minimise this common geohazard in Asturias.

By Irene Pérez Cáceres, PhD Student, Granada University.

 

If you pre-register for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

A first-timer’s guide to the 2015 General Assembly

Will this be your first time at an EGU General Assembly? With 12,000 participants in a massive venue, the conference can be a confusing and, at times, overwhelming place.

To help you find your way, we have compiled an introductory handbook filled with history, presentation pointers, travel tips and a few facts about Vienna and its surroundings. Download your copy of the EGU General Assembly guide here!

GA-Montage

 

Communicate Your Science Video Competition at EGU 2015!

Want to communicate your research to a wider audience and try your hand at video production? Now’s your chance! Young scientists pre-registered for the EGU General Assembly are invited to take part in the EGU’s Communicate Your Science Video Competition!

The aim is to produce a video up-to-three-minutes long to share your research with the general public. The winning entry will receive a free registration to the General Assembly in 2016.

Your video can include scenes of you out in the field and explaining an outcrop, or at the lab bench showing how to work out water chemistry; entries can also include cartoons, animations (including stop motion), or music videos – you name it! As long as you’re explaining concepts in the Earth, planetary and space sciences in a language suitable for a general audience, you can be as creative as you like.

Why not take a look at the finalists and winner of the 2014 competition for an idea of what makes a winning entry?

Feeling inspired? Send your video to Laura Roberts (roberts@egu.eu) by 4 March, together with proof of online pre-registration to EGU 2015. Check the EGU website for more information about the competition and pre-register for the conference on the EGU 2015 website

Shortlisted videos will be showcased on the EGU YouTube Channel in April, when voting opens! In the run up to the General Assembly and during the conference, viewers can vote for their favourite film by clicking on the video’s ‘like’ button. The winning video will be the one with the most likes by the end of the General Assembly.

What are you waiting for? Take the chance to showcase your research and spread great geoscientific facts with the world!

 

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