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New Dimensions for Natural Hazards in Asia: the first AOGS–EGU Joint Conference

New Dimensions for Natural Hazards in Asia: the first AOGS–EGU Joint Conference

Asia is one of the most natural disaster-prone regions on the globe. Overpopulation and limited resources mean that natural hazards hit local populations particularly hard.

“It doesn’t matter which index or evaluation method you use, Asia will always unfortunately come out on top when it comes to fatalities and damage from natural hazard events,” explains Dr. Adam Switzer, a member of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee.

To provide a global platform, which brings together participants from across the world and addresses the challenges which need to be unraveled, as well as the potential solutions, the Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS) and EGU have partner to host their very first joint meeting.

With Taal Volcano as the spectacular backdrop, students, early career and established scientists will gather in the Philippines from the 4th to 8th February 2018, to discuss current advances in knowledge and new perspectives relevant to natural hazards in the Asian region.

“We hope that this conference will be a fundamental new step to addressing some of the most pressing hazard problems in the region by bringing together some of the world’s top hazard practitioners in the physical, social and political sciences,” goes on to say Switzer.

The meeting will boast an innovative format, with the organisers actively sidestepping the tradition conference triple Ss: sections, sessions and silos. Instead, the programme is arranged in a series of themes which, through panels, discussion groups, networking and poster introductions, will explore seven overarching topics: from natural hazards in the megacity, to multi-hazard interactions, right through to the transient and long-term effects of catastrophic perturbations.

Niels Hovius, also of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee, adds: “we strive for a programme that explores the connectivity between processes, cause and effect, a programme that acknowledges the fact that many natural disasters have an important time dynamic, lasting much longer than the initial impact.”

The conference abstract submission is currently open, so if your research falls within one of the conference themes, consider contributing to the meeting. But hurry! Abstract submission closes on 31st August 2017.

As well as discussing and sharing advances in natural hazards science, conference participants will get the opportunity to experience the impacts of natural hazards first hand.

The Philippines is, unfortunately, rich with natural hazards and as such provides a wealth of opportunity to investigate the physical, social and economic aspects of numerous natural hazards through a series of conference field trips.  

“The recent earthquake in Bohol, the 1991 Pinatubo eruption and the devastation and recovery from 2013 Typhoon Haiyan are all part of the field program,” highlights Switzer.

Not only that, the conference takes place in a sought-after location, by tourists and locals alike. The Taal Vista Hotel is deeply rooted in the heritage of Tagaytay City. Overlooking Lake Taal, with views which stretch out over Taal volcano, it is also only a little over an hour away from the bustling city of Manila.

“There are a large range of very affordable to more luxurious accommodations available in Tagatay, although early booking is encouraged as the area is a popular one for tourism due to its environmental beauty,” points out Bruce Malamud, of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee.

The AOGS-EGU conference is accessible and affordable for both early career and more senior researchers from around the globe. It hopes to bring together the international research community, with the scientific programme, as well as its spectacular setting, suited to natural hazard scholars and practitioners alike.

The Executive Organizing Committee also hopes that its appeal will transcend the geosciences and that the meeting’s themes will attract those dealing with other aspects of natural disasters: medics, planners, managers, educators and more.

“It is important that we have dialogues that reach beyond the confines of our disciplines,” says Hovius, “For me, this conference will be an opportunity to see some iconic sites, but also to make contacts with local researchers who may be interested in joining international projects targeting multi-hazards, transient response and anomalous events.”

Visit the conference website for all the meeting details. Among the website pages you’ll find information about the conference themes, abstract submission requirements and an overview of the meeting programme. Early bird registrations (until 23rd November 2017) receive a heavily discounted rate, as do AOGS and EGU members. Students also benefit from reduced registration fees.

The website is also packed with logistical information, from details about the conference venue, through to what you can expect to eat, see and do in Tagaytay City. You can also find out if you require a visa for travel to the Philippines and what to do if you are a national of a non-visa exempt country.

By Laura Roberts (EGU Communications Officer) in collaboration with the AOGS–EGU Joint Conference Executive Organizing Committee

For inquiries about the conference please contact Meeting Matters International (nathazards@meetmatt.net). Further contact information is available on the Joint Conference website. You can also receive updates about the conference on Facebook.

Shape the EGU 2018 scientific programme: Call-for-sessions is open!

Shape the EGU 2018 scientific programme: Call-for-sessions is open!

Do you enjoy the EGU’s annual General Assembly but wish you could play a more active role in shaping the scientific programme? Now is your chance!

From today, until 8 Sep 2017, you can suggest:

  • Sessions (with conveners and description), or;
  • Modifications to the existing skeleton programme sessions
  • NEW! Suggestions for Short courses (SC) will also take place during this period
  • From now until 18 January 2018, propose Townhall and spinter meetings

Explore the EGU 2018 Programme Groups (PGs) to get a feel for the already proposed sessions and to decide which PG would be the best fit for your session. When proposing a session, make sure you consider gender diversity (i.e. is there at least one female convener?), diversity in countries/institutes, and the inclusion of early career scientists as conveners. A minimum of three conveners per session is generally desirable.

Does your idea for a session fall under the remit of two (or more) PGs? Co-organization is possible and encouraged between PGs! Put your session proposal into one PG, and you will be able to choose other PGs that you believe should be approached for co-organization.

A new Programme Group, Interdisciplinary Events (IE)was introduced in 2016. IE looks for links between disciplines in a coordinated and coherent effort, trying to create new approaches that would not be possible if handled separately. IE has four sub-programme groups that highlight new themes each year. If you plan to propose an Interdisciplinary Event, please submit your proposal in Programme group IE and indicate relevant other Programme groups in the session description or comment box. For IE sessions we kindly ask to identify another Programme group that becomes the scientific leader of the event. Accepted IE sessions will be part of the session programme of the scientific leader in addition to the IE programme.

The PG officers are on-hand to answer questions about the appropriateness of a specific session topic, so don’t hesitate to contact them if you have queries! You can also find more information about the call for sessions (and the orgaisation of the scientific programme in general) on the EGU 2018 website.

The EGU’s 2018 General Assembly, takes place in Vienna from 8 to 13 April, 2018. For more news about the upcoming General Assembly, you can also follow the offical hashtag, #EGU18, on our social media channels.

At the Assembly: Friday highlights

At the Assembly: Friday highlights

The conference is coming to a close and there’s still an abundance of great sessions to attend! Here’s our guide to getting the most out of the conference on its final day. Boost this information with features from EGU Today, the daily newsletter of the General Assembly – pick up a paper copy at the ACV entrance or download it here.

The final day of the conference kicks off with the last Union Session (US3) dedicated to discuss possible avenues of progress towards a commonly applicable framework for model building and application. Talks begin at 08:30 in Room B.

If you’ve been inspired to take a more active role in the organisation of the conference, why not head to the short course: How to convene a session at EGU 2017, starting at 10:30 in Room -2.85

Be sure to attend today’s Alexander von Humboldt Medal Lecture by Jean W.A. Poesen, who will be questioning whether research on soil erosion hazard and mitigation in the Global South is still needed (ML1: 12:15–13:15 / Room E1).

The final Great Debate of the week will address on of the biggest questions in the geosciences: Did plate tectonics start in the PaleoArchean? With conflicting schools of thought, it promises to be a lively and informative debate. Be sure to go along and share your thoughts on social media using the hashtag #EGU16GDB! (GDB5: 13:30 -15:00 /Room G1)

It’s your last chance to make the most of the networking opportunities at the General Assembly, so get on down to the poster halls and strike up a conversation. If you’re in the queue for coffee, find out what the person ahead is investigating – you never know when you might start building the next exciting collaboration! Here are some of today’s scientific highlights:

 'Mirror Mirror in the sea...' . Credit: Mario Hoppmann (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A polar bear is testing the strength of thin sea ice. Polar bears and their interaction with the cryosphere are a prime example of how the biosphere is able to adapt to an "Active Planet". They are also a prime example of how the anthropogenic influence on Earth's climate system endangers other lifeforms.

‘Mirror Mirror in the sea…’ . Credit: Mario Hoppmann (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A polar bear is testing the strength of thin sea ice. Polar bears and their interaction with the cryosphere are a prime example of how the biosphere is able to adapt to an “Active Planet”. They are also a prime example of how the anthropogenic influence on Earth’s climate system endangers other lifeforms.

Today we also announce the results of the EGU Photo Contest and the Communicate Your Science Video Competition. Head over to the EGU Booth at 12:15 to find out who the winners are.

What have you thought of the Assembly this week? Let us know at www.egu2016.eu/feedback and help make EGU 2017 even better.

We hope you’ve had a wonderful week and look forward to seeing you in 2017! Join us on this adventure in Vienna next year, 23-28 April 2017!

At the Assembly: Wednesday highlights

At the Assembly: Wednesday highlights

We’re halfway through the General Assembly already! Once again there is lots on offer at EGU 2016 and this is just a taster – be sure to complement this information with EGU Today, the daily newsletter of the General Assembly, available both in paper and for download here.

The day kicks off with the second of our Great Debates. Head to room K1 from 08:30 to 10:00 to share your thoughts on whether global economic growth is compatible with habitable climate. Themes of energy consumption, decarbonisation and global economic growth provide the backdrop for this Great Debate (GDB4: 08:30 – 10:100 / Room K1). You can follow the discussion on Twitter with #EGU16GDB, and, if you’re not attending, tune in with the conference live stream.

The educational and outreach symposia (EOS) feature sessions on geoscience education, science communication, public engagement and related topics. This year there are a large number of EOS sessions on offer. Today’s highlight has to be a talk by Matt Taylor, Project Scientists for the European Space Agency’s Rosetta Mission. The talk forms part of the GIFT workshop and will focus on the space mission to coment 67P/Churyumov – Gerasimenko.  To attend the talk, head to room B, it starts at 10:30. Make sure to check the EOS programme to see if anything else catches your fancy.

Also taking place this morning is the Union-session on the interplays between the solid Earth and the hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere (US1: 08:30 – 12:00/ Room E1). Presentations in the session will focus on the multidisciplinary approaches that aim at quantify the biotic and tectonic responses to tectonics.

Another promising event set for today is the EGU Award Ceremony, where the achievements of many outstanding scientists will be recognised in an excellent evening event from 17:30–19:00 in Room E1. Here are some of the lectures being given by these award-winning scientists:

The EGU Early Career Scientists’ Forum (12:15–13:15 in L7) is the best place to find out more about the Union and how to get involved. Because the EGU is a bottom up organisation, we are keen to hear your suggestions on how to make ECS related activities even better. There will be plenty of opportunities during the Forum for you to provide feedback.  It’s over lunch, so you’ll find a buffet of sandwiches and soft drinks when you arrive too!

Early morning tram travel in the city. (Credit: Julian Turner)

Early morning tram travel in the city. (Credit: Julian Turner)

Now on to short courses! Today offers the opportunity to learn some tips for teaching in the field of hydrology (SC31/HS11.43: 08:30 – 12:00 /Room -2.85). Wanting to learn more about open access publishing but unsure where to start? Then the workshop on the ins and outs of open access publishing is just the ticket (SC3: 13:30-15:00 / Room -2.85). Maybe you thinking your research might be interesting to the media and wider public. Come along to the short course on pitching your research to a journalist or editor, to find out what steps to follow to make your science hit the headlines (SC45: 15:30 -17:00 / Room -2.61)! In the afternoon, the Cryosphere Division is hosting a climate workshop for early career scientists, (SC48: 17:30 – 19:00 / Room 0.31).

And check out some of today’s stimulating scientific sessions:

Finally, remember to take the opportunity to meet your division’s representatives in the day’s Meet EGU sessions and, if you’ve had enough of the formalities, head on over to GeoCinema, where you’ll find some great Earth science films, including the finalists of EGU’s Communicate Your Science Video Competition. Make sure to vote on your favourite entries by ‘liking’ the videos on the EGU YouTube channel.

Have an excellent day!

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