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Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology

Imaggeo on Mondays: The place where water runs through rocks

Imaggeo on Mondays: The place where water runs through rocks

Antelope Canyon, located in Arizona, USA, was formed by erosion of the Navajo Sandstone, primarily due to flash flooding and secondarily due to other sub-aerial processes (think of physical weathering processes such as freeze-thaw weathering exfoliation and salt crystallisation). Rainwater runs into the extensive basin above the slot canyon sections, picking up speed and sand as it rushes into the narrow passageways. Over time the passageways are eroded away, making the corridors deeper and smoothing hard edges in such a way as to form characteristic ‘flowing’ shapes in the rock.

The Navajo Sandstone was deposited in an aeolian (wind-blown) environment composed of large sand dunes: imagine a sea of sand, or an erg, as it is known scientifically, not dissimilar to the present Sarah desert landscape. The exact age of the Navajo Sandstone is controversial, with dated ages ranging from Triassic to early Jurassic, spanning a time period between 250 million years ago to approximately 175 million years ago. The difficulty in determining the exact age of the unit lies in its lack of age diagnostic fossils. The Navajo Sandstone is not alone in this quandary, dating is a common problem in aeolian sediments.

“The picture was taken during a three week Southwest USA road trip in summer 2012. One of the highlights was the visit to Antelope slot canyon, which is located on Navajo land east of Page, Arizona. The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tsé bighánílíní, which means the place where water runs through rocks,” explains Frederik Tack, an atmospheric scientist from the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy and author of today’s Imaggeo on Monday’s photograph.

The erosive processes which form the canyon are still ongoing. There is an elevated risk of flash floods, meaning the canyon can only be visited as part of guide tours.

“The canyon was actually quite crowded which made taking this picture challenging, especially as I wanted to capture the peace and solitude of the landscape,” describes Tack.

The effort was worth it: Waved rocks of Antelope slot canyon was one of the EGU’s 2015 Photo Contest finalists!

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Sunset over the Labrador Sea

Ruby skies and calm waters are the backdrop for this week’s Imaggeo image – one of the ten finalist images in this year’s EGU Photo contest.

 Sunset over the Labrador Sea. Credit: Christof Pearce (distributed via  imaggeo.egu.eu)

Sunset over the Labrador Sea. Credit: Christof Pearce (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

“I took the picture while on a scientific cruise in West Greenland in 2013,” explains Christof Pearce, a postdoctoral researcher at Stockholm University. “We spent most of the time inside the fjord systems around the Greenland capital, Nuuk, but this specific day we were outside on the shelf in the open Labrador Sea. The black dot on the horizon toward the right of the image is a massive iceberg floating in the distance.”

Pearce took part in a research cruise which aimed to obtain high-resolution marine sedimentary records, which would shed light on the geology and past climate of Greenland during the Holocene, the epoch which began 11,700 years ago and continues to the present day.

A total of 12 scientists and students took part in the Danish-Greenlandic-Canadian research cruise in the Godthåbsfjord complex and on the West Greenland shelf. By acquiring cores of the sediments at the bottom of the sea floor, the research team would be able to gather information such as sediment lithology, stable isotopes preserved in fossil foraminifera – sea fairing little creatures – which can yield information about past climates, amongst other data. One of the main research aims was to learn more about the rate at which the Greenland Ice Sheet melted during the Holocene and how this affected local climate conditions and the wider climate system.

“The picture was taken approximately 25 kilometres off the shore of west Greenland coast. In this region the water depth is ca. 500 meters,” describes Pearce. “At this location we deployed a so-called gravity corer and took a 6 meter long sediment core from the ocean floor. Based on radiocarbon measurements – by measuring how much carbon 14 is left in a sample, the age of the sampled units can be known – we now know that these 6 meters correspond to approximately 12000 years of sedimentation, and thus it captures a history of climate and oceanography from the last ice age all the way to present day.”

 

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Escullos

Imaggeo on Mondays: Escullos

This picture shows a Quaternary aeolianite fossil dune at the Escullos beach, in the Nature Reserve of Cabo de Gata (Almeria, Spain). Originally a soft accumulation of sand grains, shaped by the wind into large mounds and ridges, the dunes eventually turn into rock. As the sediments compact under their own pressure and expel any moisture and fluids retained within them, they become lithified and become the structure seen in this week’s Imaggeo image. This particular example is a richly fossilifeorous and contains abundant cidaroid spines. Cidaroids are primitive forms of sea urchins, but unlike the more familiar, well rounded spike covered sea hedgehogs, their spikes are much more separated and sparse.

A present day cidaroid. Note the sparse and relatively flat spines. Credit, Alicia Morugán.

A present day cidaroid. Note the sparse and relatively flat spines. Credit, Alicia Morugán.

Almeria is the eastern most province of Andalucia, located in South East Spain. Almeria province is geologically very interesting as the relationships between tectonics, sedimentary geology and geomorphology are evident throughout the landscape. The province lies within the Baetic Cordillera, an Alpine mountain chain resulting from the collision of the micro-Iberian and African plate from Late Mesozoic to Middle Cenozoic times. This characteristic makes it very tectonically active. Furthermore, Almeria province has the driest climate in Europe, resulting in mean annual precipitation of less than 300 mm. In terms of geomorphology, quaternary alluvial fans are the most common structure in the region. Geologically speaking, aeolianite rocks are the most common rock in the region. A final thanks: thanks Maria Burguet for support editing the picture.

By Alicia Morugán, Universitat de València, València, Spain

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Painted Hills after the storm.

The geological record preserved at John Day Fossil beds, in Oregon, USA, is very special. Rarely can you study a continuous succession through changing climates quite like you can at this National Park in the USA. It is a treasure trove of some 60,000 plant and animal fossil specimens that were preserved over a period of 40 million years during the Cenozoic era (which began 66 million years ago).

The geography of Oregon 45 million years ago was significantly different to present. The region received a whopping 1350 mm of annual rainfall (compare this to the approximate annual rainfall in London of 500 mm or 300 mm in Madrid) as the Cascades Mountain range had not yet formed, meaning moisture from the Pacific was not blocked. In addition, the climate was much warmer and Oregon was primarily subtropical, dominated by broad-leaved evergreen subtropical forests.

Then, 12 million years later temperatures began to lower and the climate changed from subtropical to temperate. Deciduous forests became abundant at low altitudes, whilst at higher altitudes coniferous forests dominated the landscape. Imagine a setting not dissimilar to the present day eastern USA. There were a number of active volcanic centres in the area at the time and ash, lava, and volcanic mudflows frequently spread over the region. The volcanicity culminated over a period of 11 million years during which the Columbia River Basalt Group, an extensive large igneous province, was emplaced. The current landscape was shaped during the most recent Ice Age as glaciers from the Cascade Mountains eroded their way towards the low lying terrain in central Oregon.

Painted Hills. (Credit: Daniele Penna, via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Painted Hills. (Credit: Daniele Penna, via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Photographs don’t really come any more dramatic than this one. “The conditions were prefect; I was very lucky”, says Daniele Penna, who photographed the striking Painted Hills Unit within the National Park , “I visited the area right after a storm, when the sky was partially clearing, leaving space for some light that contrasted with the remaining dark clouds in the background. The combination of atmospheric conditions made me enjoy this stunning place even more and gave me the opportunity to capture several striking images.”

During his PhD in hydrology, Daniele spent a few months at the Oregon State University, in 2007. He took the advantage of his time there by exploring the diverse natural beauties that Oregon boasts.

If, like Daniele, you are interested in photography he has some top tips for achieving a photograph as remarkable as this week’s Imaggeo On Mondays image: “Switching from a wide angle to a moderate telephoto lens can give free rein to the photographer’s creativity in playing with the colors, juxtaposed intersecting lines and interlacing forms. An extremely vivid image emerges as a result of the contrast of light and dark, yellow and red colours, and the contrasting curved and straight lines at Painted Hills. The best time for capturing images that make an impact is reserved for the late afternoon in summer and during late spring when the local park ranger service provides information over the telephone on which species are in bloom.”

Imaggeo is the EGU’s open access geosciences image repository. Photos uploaded to Imaggeo can be used by scientists, the press and the public provided the original author is credited. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. You can submit your photos here.

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