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Imaggeo on Mondays: Moving images – Photo Contest 2016

Since 2010, the European Geosciences Union (EGU) has been holding an annual photo competition and exhibit in association with its General Assembly and with Imaggeo – the EGU’s open access image repository.

In addition to the still photographs, imaggeo also accepts moving images – short videos – which are also a part of the annual photo contest. However, 20 or more images have to be submitted to the moving image competition for an award to be granted by the judges.

This year saw seven interesting, beautiful and informative moving images entered into the competition. Despite the entries not meeting the required number of submissions for the best moving image prize to be awarded, three were highly ranked by the photo contest judges. We showcase them in today’s imaggeo on Mondays post and hope they serves as inspiration to encourage you to take short clips for submission to the imaggeo database in the future!


Aerial footage of an explosion at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala. Credit: Felix von Aulock (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

During a flight over the Caliente dome of Santiaguito volcano to collect images for photogrammetry, this explosion happened. At this distance, you can clearly see the faults along which the explosion initiates, although the little unmanned aerial vehicle is shaken quite a bit by the blast.


Undulatus asperitus clouds over Disko Bay, West Greenland. Credit: Laurence Dyke(distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Timelapse video of Undulatus asperitus clouds over Disko Bay, West Greenland. This rare formation appeared in mid-August at the tail end of a large storm system that brought strong winds and exceptional rainfall. The texture of the cloud base is caused by turbulence as the storm passed over the Greenland Ice Sheet. The status of Undulatus asperitus is currently being reviewed by the World Meteorological Organisation. If accepted, it will be the first new cloud type since 1951. Camera and settings: Sony PMW-EX1, interval recording mode, 1 fps, 1080p. Music: Tycho – A Walk.

Lahar front at Semeru volcano, Indonesia. Credit: Franck Lavigne (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Progression of the 19 January 2002 lahar front in the Curah Lengkong river, Semeru volcano, Indonesia. Channel is 25 m across. For further information, please contact me (franck.lavigne@univ-paris1.fr)

 

Geo Talk: One of the youngest EGU 2016 General Assembly delegates sends sensor to space

Geo Talk: One of the youngest EGU 2016 General Assembly delegates sends sensor to space

Presenting at an international conference is daunting, even for the most seasoned of scientists; not so for Thomas Maier (a second year university student) who took his research (co-authored by  Lukas Kamm, a high-school student) to the EGU 2016 General Assembly! Not only was their work on developing a moisture sensor impressive, so was Thomas’ enthusiasm and confidence when presenting his research. Hazel Gibson and Kai Boggild, EGU Press Assistants at the conference, caught up with the budding researcher to learn more about the pair’s work. Scroll down to the end of this post for a full video interview with Thomas. 

Thomas Maier might seem like your average bright and enthusiastic EGU delegate, but together with his co-author Lukas Kamm, he has invented a water sensor that very well might help change the way astronauts live in space. Not only is their invention helping to revolutionise aerospace, but they are also the youngest delegates at the conference, Thomas is a second year university student at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg and Lukas is attending high school at Werner-von-Siemens Gymnasium. We caught up with Thomas to speak with him about his invention.

Could you explain to us what led you to develop this water sensor?

We started this project four years ago for a contest called Jugend Forscht, a German youth sciences competition in Germany and the project we came up with was about giving plants demand driven watering. After we built our first sensor, we continued our work until it was possible to send the sensor into space, for a project called EU:CROPIS.

Can you tell us how your sensor works?

The sensor is based on a capacitive measuring method. So, you have two electrodes close to each other, which have an electrical capacitance (or ability to store an electrical charge) between them. The change in water content close to the electrodes changes the capacity of the sensor. Then we measure the capacity of the electrodes by measuring the time constant of the capacitor over time.

The greenhouse which forms part of the EU:CROPIS project. The greenhouse is home to Thomas and Lukas' water sensor. (Credit: Kai Boggild/EGU)

The greenhouse which forms part of the EU:CROPIS project. The greenhouse is home to Thomas and Lukas’ water sensor. (Credit: Kai Boggild/EGU)

Can you tell us more about the EU:CROPIS project?

The EU:CROPIS is mainly about this here [indicates greenhouse model], and this is a greenhouse which will go into space, July next year. The greenhouse will rotate and will generate different gravitational forces that may impact the amount of water available to plants which will be grown in here. And now, after a lot of work, our sensor will be placed on the very right [hand side] of the greenhouse and will measure the soil moisture for the plants.

What are you plans for this project into the future?

Our plans for the future are in taking part in the EDEN-ISS project, this is a project on the International Space Station, that is looking into planting 20 square meters of plants in the ISS and our sensor would be used too. So that is the next aim of this project.

Thanks Thomas for showing us your invention, and good luck to Lukas, who couldn’t attend the conference this year as he is busy with his high-school exams!

Interview by Hazel Gibson, video interview by Kai Boggild, EGU Press Assistants

 

Photo Contest finalists 2016 – who will you vote for?

The selection committee received over 400 photos for this year’s EGU Photo Contest, covering fields across the geosciences. The fantastic finalist photos are below and they are being exhibited in Hall X2 (basement, Brown Level) of the Austria Center Vienna – see for yourself!

Do you have a favourite? Vote for it! There is a voting terminal (also in Hall X2), just next to the exhibit. The results will be announced on Friday 22 April during the lunch break (at 12:15).

 'Icebound blades of grass' . Credit: Katja Laute (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A close up of blades of grass totally coated with ice. The photo was taken at sunset along the shoreline of Selbusjøen, a lake in middle Norway. The coating of the ice was built through the interplay of wave action and the simultaneously freezing of the water around the single blades of grass.

‘Icebound blades of grass’. Credit: Katja Laute (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A close up of blades of grass totally coated with ice. The photo was taken at sunset along the shoreline of Selbusjøen, a lake in middle Norway. The coating of the ice was built through the interplay of wave action and the simultaneously freezing of the water around the single blades of grass.

 'There is never enough time to count all the stars that you want.' . Credit: Vytas Huth (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The centre of the Milky Way taken near Krakow am See, Germany. Some of the least light-polluted atmosphere of the northern german lowlands.

‘There is never enough time to count all the stars that you want’. Credit: Vytas Huth (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The centre of the Milky Way taken near Krakow am See, Germany. Some of the least light-polluted atmosphere of the northern german lowlands.

 'Full moon over Etna's fire'. Credit: Severine Furst (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Etna is one of the most active volcano on Earth but also one the most monitored. As soon as instruments show any signs of volcanic activity, scientists from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) of Catania urge to the summit to gather various eruption data. In this summer evening, the fresh wind sweep the clouds to reveal the rise of the full moon over one of Etna's summit craters where a strombolian eruption is taking place.

‘Full moon over Etna’s fire’. Credit: Severine Furst (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Etna is one of the most active volcano on Earth but also one the most monitored. As soon as instruments show any signs of volcanic activity, scientists from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) of Catania urge to the summit to gather various eruption data. In this summer evening, the fresh wind sweep the clouds to reveal the rise of the full moon over one of Etna’s summit craters where a strombolian eruption is taking place.

 'There is never enough time to count all the stars that you want.' . Credit: Vytas Huth (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Ice on Jokulsarlon beach in Iceland. Ice calving off the Breidamerkurjokull, one of the glaciers comprising the Vatnajokull, the largest glacier in Iceland. The is retreating rapidly, and in the process has created a large glacial lagoon known for its spectacular icebergs.

‘Glowing Ice’. Credit: Vytas Huth (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Ice on Jokulsarlon beach in Iceland. Ice calving off the Breidamerkurjokull, one of the glaciers comprising the Vatnajokull, the largest glacier in Iceland. The is retreating rapidly, and in the process has created a large glacial lagoon known for its spectacular icebergs.

 'Ice lace flower'. Credit: Maria Elena Popa (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Early morning shot of a spider web with frozen water droplets. The photo has been turned upside down, to make it look like a flower.

‘Ice lace flower’. Credit: Maria Elena Popa (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Early morning shot of a spider web with frozen water droplets. The photo has been turned upside down, to make it look like a flower.

 Sphalerite's "Transformer"'. Credit: Dmitry Tonkacheev (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The bulk of Au wire "boards" on the dark-brown phase surface in the form of fascination crystals (usually arborescent). Some of them look like a weapon from the "Transformers" arsenal or parts of his armor. Also bright diamond luster of this creature makes our "Knight" even more ultra-modern.

‘Sphalerite’s “Transformer”‘. Credit: Dmitry Tonkacheev (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The bulk of Au wire “boards” on the dark-brown phase surface in the form of fascination crystals (usually arborescent). Some of them look like a weapon from the “Transformers” arsenal or parts of his armor. Also bright diamond luster of this creature makes our “Knight” even more ultra-modern.

 'Nimbostratus painting the sky'. Credit: y María Burguet (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). This photo was taken in Valencia (Spain) during a storm formation. Nimbostratus are described as a grey cloud cover with a veiled appearance due to the precipitation (liquid or solid) holded within them. They are formed when a large layer of relatively warm and humid air ascend above a cold air mass. Together with the Altostratus, it is the core of a warm front.

‘Nimbostratus painting the sky’. Credit: María Burguet (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). This photo was taken in Valencia (Spain) during a storm formation. Nimbostratus are described as a grey cloud cover with a veiled appearance due to the precipitation (liquid or solid) held within them. They are formed when a large layer of relatively warm and humid air ascend above a cold air mass. Together with the Altostratus, it is the core of a warm front.

 'Living flows'. Credit: Marc Girons Lopez (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). River branches and lagoons in the Rapa river delta, Sarek National Park, northern Sweden. The lush vegetation creates a stark contrast with the glacial sediments transported by the river creating a range of tonalities.

‘Living flows’. Credit: Marc Girons Lopez (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). River branches and lagoons in the Rapa river delta, Sarek National Park, northern Sweden. The lush vegetation creates a stark contrast with the glacial sediments transported by the river creating a range of tonalities.

 'View of the Mausoleum'. Credit: Mike Smith (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The north Antrim coast in Northern Ireland, featuring one of the most spectacular coastal roads. In the distance the Mussenden Temple, built in 1785 as a reclusive library 40 m above the Atlantic Ocean.

‘View of the Mausoleum’. Credit: Mike Smith (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The north Antrim coast in Northern Ireland, featuring one of the most spectacular coastal roads. In the distance the Mussenden Temple, built in 1785 as a reclusive library 40 m above the Atlantic Ocean.

 'Frozen angel'. Credit: Mikhail Varentsov (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Go-Pro camera, covered by hoarfrost, at sunrise, looks like fantasy-style angel with sword and banner. Photo made during NABOS-2015 expedition.

‘Frozen angel’. Credit: Mikhail Varentsov (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Go-Pro camera, covered by hoarfrost, at sunrise, looks like fantasy-style angel with sword and banner. Photo made during NABOS-2015 expedition.

In addition, this year, to celebrate the theme of the EGU 2016 General Assembly, Active Planet, the photo that best captured the theme of the conference was selected by the judges. The winner is this stunning photo entitled ‘Mirror mirror in the sea…’, by Mario Hoppmann! Congratulations! This too is being exhibited in Hall X2 (basement, Brown Level) of the Austria Center Vienna.

 'Mirror Mirror in the sea...' . Credit: Mario Hoppmann (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A polar bear is testing the strength of thin sea ice. Polar bears and their interaction with the cryosphere are a prime example of how the biosphere is able to adapt to an "Active Planet". They are also a prime example of how the anthropogenic influence on Earth's climate system endangers other lifeforms.

‘Mirror Mirror in the sea…’ . Credit: Mario Hoppmann (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A polar bear is testing the strength of thin sea ice. Polar bears and their interaction with the cryosphere are a prime example of how the biosphere is able to adapt to an “Active Planet”. They are also a prime example of how the anthropogenic influence on Earth’s climate system endangers other lifeforms.

Imaggeo on Mondays: recreating geological processes in the lab

Imaggeo on Mondays: recreating geological processes in the lab

Many of the processes which take place on Earth happen over very long time scales, certainly when compared to the life span of a person. The same is true for geographical scale. Many of the processes which dominate how our planet behaves are difficult to visualise given the vast distances (and depths) over which they occur.

To overcome this difficulty, scientists have developed and resorted to a number of tools; from geological mapping right through to generating computer models. One such tool dates back some two centuries: analogue experiments. Initially they started off as roughly scaled experiments to test a range of hypothesis. Famously, James Hutton used analogue models to prove that the folding of originally horizontal strata is the result of lateral compression. With time they have become increasingly sophisticated, allowing researchers to replicate a vast range of conditions and environments which lead to a better understanding of how our planet works.

Today’s Imaggeo on Monday’s image, by Stephane Dominguez, a researcher Chargé de Recherche CNRS, in Montpellier, shows the final evolution stage of an analog experiment dedicated to the study of Relief Dynamics – how surface topography comes to be – and what role tectonics, erosion and sedimentation play in the formation of landscapes. In such experiments, typical scaling is 1cm = a few hundred meters and 1s = a few tens of years.

In this particular experiment “we used a specific granular material mixture (made of water saturated silica, microbeads, PVC and graphite powders, to simulate a portion of the upper terrestrial crust submitted to tectonic extension (where the crust is being stretched, such as at, but not limited to, continental rifts and divergent plate boundries),”explains Stephane.

At the same time, the research team used a rainfall system to project micro water droplets on the model surface. This causes water runoff to initiate and starts the growing reliefs to be eroded.

“We obtain a very realistic morphology that continuously evolves in response to complex interactions between surface deformation (induced by normal fault activity – caused by the stretching of the crust) and surface processes (erosion, sediment transport and deposition).”

 

References

Ranalli, G.: Experimental tectonics: from Sir James Hall to the present, Journal of Geodynamics, 32, 65-76.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

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